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Capt. John FROST

Male Abt 1770 - Aft 1834  (~ 64 years)


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  • Name John FROST 
    Title Capt. 
    Born Abt 1770  Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    AFN 462K-3L 
    Died Aft 4 Sep 1834 
    Notes 

    • (1) Frost, Wright W., The Frosts and Related Families of Bedford County, Tennessee, Knoxville, TN: 1962, pp. 7, 16-23:

      John Frost, usually referred to as Captain John Frost, was the first child of Ebenezer and Sarah Fairchild Frost. He is thought to have been born about 1770 and to have died after September 4, 1834. He married twice, 1) Rebecca Boone, daughter of John and Rebecca Boone, on August 21, 1793, and 2) Elizabeth Chaffin Hunt, daughter of Nathan Chaffin and widow of Enoch Hunt, on March 22, 1817. . . .

      John Frost, son of Ebenezer, Sr. and Sarah Fairchild Frost, is reported to have been born in 1770; but the exact date is not known. Documentary evidence That John Frost was the son of Ebenezer Frost, Sr., is established in a roundabout way through the records of Davie County, North Carolina. Chaffin Frost, son of John Frost and second wife Elizabeth Chaffin (Hunt) Frost, on July 23, 1860, from Leon County, Texas, gave power of attorney to Haman Critz in the settlement of the "estate of my aunt Amy Frost," who died April 15, 1857 (Davie County Deed Book 4, p. 372). Amy Frost, as evidenced by her mother's will (Rowan County Will Book II, p. 323), was Ebenezer, Sr., and Elizabeth Wilson Frost's daughter. The relationship between John Frost and Chaffin is verified by a deed of November 22, 1826, from Francis Neely to ". . . Benjamin and Chaffin Frost likewise sons of the aforementioned John Frost. . . ." (Rowan County Deed Book 29, p. 401). The relationship between John Frost and his father is suggested also by two land grants to the latter. As indicated earlier, these grants, Number 163 and Number 215, were signed by John Frost and Ebenezer Frost, Jr., as chainbearers. The relatioaship is further verified by the unrecorded indenture which includes John Frost among his father's children and to which reference was made in the section Ebenezer Frost's Children.

      Among the early records of John Frost in the Rowan County courthouse in Salisbury, North Carolina is that of his marriage to Rebecca Boone, daughter of John and Rebecca Boone. The date of this marriage bond was August 21, 1793, and John Wilson, probably John Frost's step-uncle, was surety. This marriage bond is the most definite refutation of a tradition among the Frosts of Flat Creek, Tennessee, that John Frost had married Sarah Boone, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Dagley Boone. There is an abundance of other documentary evidence that it was Rebecca Boone, daughter of John and Rebecca Boone, who married John Frost. One of these is the record of a real estate transaction which took place on November 6, 1806, among the widow and other heirs of John Boone, deceased. An excerpt from this record follows: "Rebecca Boone, wife of John Boone, deceased, Benjamin Boone, son of deceased for himself and for Mark Whitaker and John McDaniel as attorney, Nancy Clifford, wife of Jacob Clifford, John Wilson, John Frost, James Penry, Samuel Little, heirs of said John Boone, deceased, land to John Boone, son of the deceased. . . . (Rowan County Deed Book 21, p. 489). Property rights of women in those days were assumed by their husbands upon marriage. John Frost, therefore, had the legal status of heir to property coming to his wife Rebecca Boone Frost, daughter of the deceased John Boone. Additional verification is found in the tombstone inscription in the Old Frost Burying Ground - "Rebecca Frost, Deceased in 1816." Of significance is the will made by John Boone's widow, Rebecca Boone, dated August 6, 1815, and probated in 1822, in part as follows: "I Rebecca Boone . . . give and bequeath to my beloved granddaughter, Rebecca Frost, one hundred dollars to be hers forever." (Rowan County Will Book H, p. 169). This granddaughter, of course, was John Frost's daughter who later married Alexander Haden. More than half a century later in faraway Arkansas, a monument was erected which further verifies the marriage of John Frost and Rebecca Boone. In Calhoun County, in the Camp Ground Presbyterian Church Cemetery, three miles north of Hampton, Arkansas, the marker bears this inscriphon: "Enoch Boone Frost, Son of John and Rebecca Frost, Born in Rowan County, North Carolina, October 15, 1806, Died March 28, 1879."

      John Frost purchased on February 16, 1801, a tract of land on Dutchmans Creek from his father (Rowan County Deed Book 18, p. 726). Ebenezer Frost's signature to the deed was witnessed by his son Wilson Frost and his son-in-law David Holman. lt was while living in this area and while his wife Rebecca yet lived that John Frost served in the War of 1812. Although he never received any pension, photocopies of carded records of his military service in the National Archives reveal that he was captain of a company of infantry in Colonel Jesse A. Pearson's Seventh Regiment of North Carolina Militia. The Company Muster Roll shows that Captain John Frost was at Fort Hawkins from February 1 to March 28, 1814, at Fort Decatur from March 28 to May 26, and in a camp near Fort Hawkins from then until July 16. Pursuant to a General Order of December 1, 1814, he appeared with the rank of Captain for a court martial - not as a defendant - in Salisbury, Norrh Carolina, from January 9, 1815, to February 2. Living costs of the day are reflected in his subsistence allowance of $16.20 for eighty-one meals a1 20?? each. His total pay and allowance for his court martial service was $88.15. In most family references to John Frost, he has been spoken of as Captain John Frost.

      Since Rebecca Boone Frost's grave stone gives only the year of her death - 1816, it is not known how long she had been dead on March 22, 1817, when Captain John Frost married Enoch Hunt's widow, Elizabeth Chaffin Hunt, daughter of Nathan Chaffin. Enoch Hunt had been dead since November 22, 1815, according to Chaffin Bible records. This second marriage for both John and Elizabith Chaffin Frost was recorded in Rowan County with R. (Ransom) Powell as surety. Ransom Powell married Patsy Anderson, sister of Garland Anderson who married Captain John Frost's daughter Sarah.

      In 1962 Mrs. Louise Utley of Davie County, North Carolina had in her possession a portion of the ledger for Old Mock's Store for the time concurrent with the early years of John Frost's second marriage. This was a tavern and general merchandise store located on or near the present site of Mocksville, the present county seat of Davie County. John Frost's name was entered frequently in this ledger and always as "Capt. John Frost."

      Captain John Frost and his second wife had lived on adjoining farms before their marriage. Indications are that Captain John Frost and his family changed places of residence a number of times between 1820 and 1825, and it appears that he even may have maintained more than one residence for himself and his wife and their ehildien who had not already married. On March 15, 1820, John Frost, then living in Rowan County, purchased from Bartley Greenwd of Surry County a tract of land consisting of 100 acres north of the Yadkin River but on both sides of Mitchell's River (Surry County Deed Book Q, p. 228). Apparently Captain John Frost and his family moved shortly thereafter to Surry County, for the 1820 Census Report for that county contains a John Frost whose household listing is reasonably compatible with the family Captain John Frost is thought to have had at that time. The listing of a John Frost in the 1820 Census Report of Rowan County with ages of members of the household slightly difterent from those in Surry could mean that Captain John Frost was maintaining households in both counties and shuttled back and forth to look after his various properties. As neither census report seems to include all of his unmarried children and certainly not all of his wife's children by her former marriage, it is likely that some of the older children lived in one of the homes and some in the other. The dual or transient residence of Captain John Frost is suggested also by some of his real estate transactions which followed the one in 1820. On February 23, 1824, John Frost gave Rowan County as his residence when he sold his son Boone Frost seventy-six acres of land for $360 in Rowan County on the road from Dutchmans Creek Bridge to Statesville (Rowan County Deed Book 29, pp. 163-164). Less than two months later, on April 9, 1824, he gave Surry County as his place of residence when he sold to Batson Naylor for $8.00 approximately twenty-four and a half acres on Dutchmans Creek, a part of a tract conveyed from Thomas Skinner to Jonathan Frost and later from Jonathan Frost to his half-brother John Frost (Rowan County Deed Book 28, pp. 196-197). On August 6, 1824, Rebecca Frost, one of John Frost's unmarried daughters, was designated as a resident of Surry County when her brother-in-law Garland Anderson of Rowan County made her a deed of gift of a Negro girl named Esther (Rowan County Deed Book 28, p. 571).

      An unfortunate financial plight which befell Captain John Frost during the 1820's is indicated by two mortgages, one of which was foreclosed, and a lawsuit which followed. By way of inquiring into Captain John Frost's finances, the writer wrote to T. E. Swann of Statesville, North Carolina, a descendant of Captain John Frost's half-sister Rachel: "You don't suppose Captain John Frost's indebtedness was caused by too many visits to Old Mock's Tavern, do you?"

      To this Mr. Swam replied: "As yet I am not ready to think the financial condition of Captain John Frost or Boone Frost might have been due to too frequent visits to the tavern. You remember he mortgaged two stills."

      Mrs. Louise Utley, who has given many years of study to Captain John Frost and his relatives and who does not approve of such joking at Captain John Frost's expense, pointed out that the Frost mills were for the purpose of extracting sassafras oil which was used in those days for embalming and that the two stills were used in the production of sassafras oil rather than of intoxicants.

      The writer has not been able to determine the cause of Captain John Frost's financial difficulties. The most logical explanation is that he over-extended himself in the purchase of land, the operation of his mills, and the support of the Frost and Hunt children. As early as September 15, 1821, Captain John Frost found himself unable to make payment on a note of $1100 due his neighbor Joseph Allison. Another neighbor paid Joseph Allison $924 for the note upon John Frost's making a new one for $1152.75 due one day after October 4, 1821. The neighbor who had discounted the note at the rate of 16% was Francis Neely, a wealthy land owner who is said to have carried gold coins in his walking stick. In a subsequent lawsuit, Captain John Frost's attorney spoke of Francis Neely as a "money dealer." On August 2, 1824, Captain John Frost made a new note for $1580.64 due one day from date in lieu of all past obligations to Francis Neely. By this date Captain John Frost had known debts totaling more than $2,000, including a $496 note due ninety days from May 18, 1824, to the Salisbury Branch of the State Bank of North Carolina of which Francis Neely is said to have been a vice president. On August 3, 1824, Captain John Frost mortgaged all of his land in Rowan County and most of his personal property thereon in security of these debts. Named as trustees in the mortgage were his half-brother Samuel and his three sons-in-law, George Saner, Garland Auderson, and Natnan C. Hunt. As the place of his residence is not mentioned in the mortgage, it is assumed that he was still living in Surry County, particularly since one of the tracts was designated by Captain John Frost as "land whereon I formerly dwelt" (Rowan County Deed Book 10, pp. 579-580).

      By August 20, 1825, Captain John Frost's financial situation appears to have become worse, as indicated by a new mortgage with the same trustees and the same security but with increased liens. Although he had reduced his debt to the bank at Salisbury, he had not been credited even with interest on his debts to Francis Neely; and Valentine Bradleman had been awarded a judgement of $800 with costs and interest against him by the November, 1824, Term of Rowan County Court. By the date of this mortgage Captain John Frost was back in his old home in Rowan County; for one of the tracts was descibed as ". . . one other tract of land whereupon the said John Frost now lives in Rowan County aforesaid on the waters of Dutchmans Creek in the forks of the Yadkin and bounded by the lands of Samuel Smith, Boone Frost, Thomas Owings, and Joseph Allison and containing by estimation 134 aces more or less with all appurtenances. . . ." This is the tract often referred to as the "Home Place." The largest tract of land consisted of 400 acres in the forks of the Yadkin and was known as the "Johnson Mill Tract on Frost Mill Creek." Captain John Frost mortgaged even his wife's dower from her previous husband described by him as ". . . also my right and title in and to one other tract of land lying on Cedar Creek . . . known as Hunt's Mill Tract containing by estimation two hundred sixty acres, more or less, also my right and title in and to such lands in consequence of my wife Elizabeth's claim in right of dower. . . ." (Rowan County Deed Book 28, pp. 206-208). Among the items of personal property listed were two stills, a wagon, five pair of gears, five head of horses, ten head of cattle, about fifty hogs, about twenty head of sheep and four Negroes.

      Both mortgages provided for foreclosure upon a thirty-day notice. Apparently notice was given almost immediately after execution of the second mortgage, for a public sale was held on September 27, 1825. Francis Neely bid in many of Captain John Frost's personal effects as well as two tracts of land, paying only $923 for the Johnson Mill Tract and $810 for the Home Place (Rowan County Deed Book 29, pp. 127 and 169). Although the trustees' signatures were on the deeds, Captain John Frost did not sign them.

      Apparently Captain John Frost acted without the advice of an attorney in his dealings with Francis Neely and was led to believe that the latter was befriending him by preventing others from taking his land. Indeed he remained on the Home Place until some time in 1826 when he removed to Surrey County and left as a tenant on the farm his son Boone made a crop in 1827 which was seized by Francis Neely when he actually took possession of the land.

      On a date preceding "the 2nd. Monday after the 4th. Monday in March," 1829, Captain John Frost brought suit against Francis Neely in the Court of Equity in Rowan County, North Carolina (Rowan County Equity Court Minutes 1820-1834, pp. 125-131) "humbly complaining" among other grievances: That Francis Neely had charged John Frost usurious interest, discounting two separate notes at 16%, payable one day after date; that Francis Neely had failed to credit as part payment the $400 value of a Negro woman and child sold and delivered to Francis Neely by John Frost for that purose; that Francis Neely "by false and deceitful practices" had induced John Frost to execute a trust deed in security for debts owed Francis Neely and others; that Francis Neely had forced a public sale of John Frost's property, both real and personal, to satisfy liens held against it and then interfered with the sale in order to prevent the price from exceeding the amount needed to discharge the liens against it - this under the pretense of holding the property, particularly the Home Place, for John Frost but actually for the purpose of gaining possession of it at a price no higher than the liens against it.

      In his suit John Frost "prayed" the Judge of the Court of Equity that Francis Neely be subpoenaed into Court to give an account of the transaction involving John Frost's debts and property and that he be required to refund to John Frost all values which he had received from John Frost in excess of what he had legally owed him, that he surrender and reconvey to John Frost the Home Place of 130 acres, and that John Frost be allowed such other relief to which in justice and equity he was entitled.

      Captain John Frost's attorney, R. M. Landers, appears to have been a master in submitting the case for his client, cleverly "praying" the judge to include as defendants in suit such persons as might come into court and "combining and confederating . . . and contriving how to injure and oppress . . ." John Frost by testifying that the lands purchased by Francis Neely were not worth more than the principal and interest on John Frost's debts. It was unfortunate for Captain John Frost that he had not had equally able counsel in the draft and execution of his contracts. In the Minutes for the Spring Term, 1830, of the Equity Court is this notation: "This suit having been compromised, it is ordered that the complainant [John Frost] pay the cost according to the terms of the compromise." The terms of the compromise were not given; but apparently Captain John Frost won at least a portion of the judgement which he sought, as indicated by the transactions described in the next paragraph.

      On November 26, 1829, Francis Neely died after having willed to his daughter Mary, who had married Isaac Holeman, both the Home Place and the Johnson Mill Tract formerly owned by Captain John Frost (Rowan County Deed Book 30, p. 90). This Isaac Holeman, incidentally, was a grandson of the Isaac Holeman whose son David married Rachel Frost, daughter of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Wilson Frost. On January 30, 1830, Captain John Frost signed two deeds (Rowan County Deed Book 30, pp. 991 and 993). In the first, for the consideration of $1,100 paid to him by Isaac Holeman and other executors and devisees of Francis Neely, deceased, he sold all his interest "either at Law or Equity or otherwise" to the above mentioned tracts of land. The second was a quit claim dead, also for this consideration of $1,100, by which Captain John Frost ". . . remised, released, and forever quit claim . . ." unto the heirs of Francis Neely, deceased, "all manner of action and actions, cause and causes of action, suits, bills, bonds, writings, obligations, debts, dues, duties, reckoning, accounts, sum and sums of money, Judgements, Executions, Events, quarrels, controversy, trespassers, Damages, and demands whatsover which against him the said Francis Neely, Dec'd. . . ."

      Earlier, on November 22, 1826, Francis Neely himself had made a deed of gift to seven of Captain John Frost's children as follows: ". . . to Rebecca Haden, daughter of John Frost formerly of said county and state, a piece of furniture termed a case of drawers, unto Icy Ann and Hannah Frost, also daughters of said Frost, a china press and desk, unto Enoch and John Frost, sons of said John Frost, a small wagon, unto Benjamin and Chaffin Frost, likewise sons of the aforementioned John Frost, one riding chair, all which property I purchased the 27th day of September 1825 on the premises then occupied by the said John Frost in the County of Rowan. . . . But this instrument shall never be considered binding on me or my heirs to guarantee the said property any further than as my rights of said property" (Rowan County Deed Book 29, pp. 401- 402). Although these gifts to Captain John Frost's children indicated an act either of generosity or of restitution, the last quoted sentence appears to reflect some doubt in Francis Neely's own mind about his title to the property which he had received through the foreclosure of the mortgage. From a genealogical standpoint, Francis Neely's gifts to seven of John Frost's children became a bequest to all their descendants, for no other document known to the writer so unquestionably identifies them as Captain John Frost's children.

      Although Captain John Frost's holdings in Surry County seem never to have equalled those he formerly held in Rowan, his loss of his property in the latter county did not leave him bankrupt. The deed books of Surry County verify his ownership of land, and the Census Report of 1830, which listed him as between 60 and 70 years of age, showed that he owned six slaves.

      On November 13, 1833, Captain John Frost paid his half-brother James $500 for four tracts of land on the north side of the Yadkin River on both sides of Mitchell's River. On December 27 he sold three of these tracts to Henry Mosely for $1,100 (Surry County Deed Book 10, p. 189, and Book 22, pp. 28-29). By this time Captain John Frost's son John, Jr., was grown and had already married. For this reason, perhaps, Captain John Frost was named in these deeds as "John Frost, Sr.," and "John Frost, Sen." No record has been found, however, where the son was designated as "John Frost, Jr." Captain John Frost appears to have been last on record in Surry County on September 4, 1834, when a John Frost sold to Absolem Lion 100 acres of land on Camp Creek for $100 (Surry County Deed Book X, p. 169). The writer's lack of familiarity with the area and his inability to locate Camp Creek make it impossible for him to determine if this 100-acre tract was land which he had purchased in 1820 or one of the four tracts which he had bought from his half-brother James. Since neither "Sr.'' nor "Jr." was used with the name in this transaction, there is also the question of whether it was John Frost the father or John Frost the son who sold this property. Since the son is not known to have purchased any land which he could have sold in Surry County before his migration to Missouri, the writer assumes thatit was Captain John Frost who sold land to Absolem Lion and that probably he had died or had left Surry County by August, 1938, when the deed was proved in open court by the oath of John Roberts, a subscribing witness. The lack of records for the sale of the six slaves which he owned in 1830 and for the settlement of his estate is an indication, but not an evidence, that Captain John Frost left Surry County before the time of his death.

      There is a tradition among some descendants that Captain John Frost died in Madison County, Alabama, possibly while visting his son Ebenezer B. Frost; but no record has been found to indicate that he was ever in that area; and no such tradition came down through Ebenezer B. Frost's descendants, so far as the writer has been able to determine. In 1834, the last year Captain John Frost is known or thought to have been in Surry County, North Carolina, and the last year in which his son Ebenezer B. Frost lived in Madison County, Alabama, Ebenezer B. Frost's son John Ebenezer Frost was nine years old and certainly would have remembered his grandfather if he had seen him at that age. Nevertheless, the Reverend John Ebenezer Frost's recorded statement about his grandfather Frost is so vague and confusing that it indicates that the two never met. It is omitted from these narratives for the reason that it might lead to further confusion. It is mentioned only for the purpose of discounting the feasibility of the tradition that Captain John Frost died in Madison County, Alabama, while visiting his son Ebenezer B. Frost. . . .

      Since four of Captain John Frost's children - Polly, Hannah, Boone, and John, Jr. - are known to have migrated to Missouri, a careful study has been made of family and public records to determine if Captain John Frost and his second wife accompanied or followed any of them to that state. Not the slightest piece of evidence has been round. On the contrary, there is a tradition that Hannah, who is reported to have aroused her father's ire by eloping with David Martin, was disinherited and never saw her father after her marriage. This indicates that Captain John Frost did not live long in Missouri, if indeed he went there; for Hannah is reported to have visited some, if not all, of her brothers and sisters who settled in Missouri. The least explored and probably the most likely possibility that Captain John Frost accompanied one of his children to Missouri is that it was with his son John Jr. - the least explored because John Frost, Jr., died before 1850, and none of his living descendants have been identified; the most likely because John Frost, Jr., appears to have migrated to Missouri about the same time that his father was last on record in Surry County, North Carolina. The writer and his consultants are unaware of any record which indicates the date of death or place of burial of Captain John Frost or of his second wife, Elizabeth Chaffin (Hunt) Frost.

      (2) A household headed by John FROST is listed in the 1830 census of Surry County, NC.

      Listed in John's household are 2 free white males between 10 and 15 years of age; 1 free white male between 15 and 20 years of age; 1 free white male between 60 and 70 years of age; 1 free white female between 20 and 30 years of age; and 1 free white females between 50 and 60 years of age. Also listed in John's household are 2 slaves.

      Assuming that John is the free white male listed in the 1830 census as then being between 60 and 70 years of age, he would have born between 1760 and 1770, according to the 1830 census.

      Assuming that John's wife is the free white male listed in the 1830 census as then being between 50 and 60 years of age, she would have been born between 1770 and 1780, according to the 1830 census.

      Assuming that the other free white persons in John's household are children of John and/or his wife, those children would have consisted of 3 sons (2 of which sons would have been born between 1815 and 1820, and 1 of which sons would have been born between 1810 and 1815, according to the 1830 census) and 1 daughter (which daughter would have been born between 1800 and 1810, according to the 1830 census).
    Person ID I8675  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2019 

    Father Ebenezer FROST, Sr.,   b. 23 Nov 1746, Morristown, Morris County, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jan 1824, Rowan [now Davie] County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Sarah FAIRCHILD,   b. Abt 1751, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 2 Nov 1775, Rowan [now Davie] County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 24 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married Abt 5 Dec 1769  Rowan [now Davie] County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F8149  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Rebecca BOONE,   b. 26 May 1768, Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1816, Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Married 21 Aug 1793  Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Enoch Boone FROST,   b. 15 Oct 1806, Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Mar 1879, Calhoun County, AR Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)  [natural]
     2. Daniel Boone FROST,   b. 3 Nov 1803,   d. 8 Feb 1866, Linn County, OR Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)  [natural]
     3. Mary FROST,   b. 4 Oct 1799, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1872, Jackson County, MO Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)  [natural]
     4. Rebecca FROST,   b. Abt 1802, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     5. Elizabeth FROST,   b. Abt 1801, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1820  (Age ~ 19 years)  [natural]
     6. Icy Ann FROST  [natural]
     7. John FROST, Jr.  [natural]
     8. Benjamin FROST  [natural]
     9. Hannah FROST  [natural]
     10. Sarah FROST  [natural]
     11. Ebenezer B. FROST  [natural]
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2019 17:10:02 
    Family ID F4179  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Elizabeth CHAFFIN,   b. Abt 1777, Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 6 Jul 1850  (Age ~ 73 years) 
    Married 22 Mar 1817  Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Marriage Fact 22 Mar 1817  Rowan County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Marriage Bond 
    Children 
     1. Chaffin FROST,   b. Abt 1818, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2019 17:10:02 
    Family ID F4180  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) North Carolina, Marriages, 1759-1979: Name: JohnFrost Birth Date: Birthplace: Age: Spouse's Name: Rebecca Boon Spouse's Birth Date: Spouse's Birthplace: Spouse's Age: Event Date: 21 Aug 1793 Event Place: Rowan, North Carolina Father's Name: Mother's Name: Spouse's Father's Name: Spouse's Mother's Name: Race: Marital Status: Previous Wife's Name: Spouse's Race: Spouse's Marital Status: Spouse's Previous Husband's Name: Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M75225-9 System Origin: North Carolina-EASy GS Film number: 1760524 Reference ID:.

    2. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) North Carolina, Marriages, 1759-1979: Name: JohnFrost Birth Date: Birthplace: Age: Spouse's Name: Elizabeth Hunt Spouse's Birth Date: Spouse's Birthplace: Spouse's Age: Event Date: 22 Mar 1817 Event Place: Rowan, North Carolina Father's Name: Mother's Name: Spouse's Father's Name: Spouse's Mother's Name: Race: Marital Status: Previous Wife's Name: Spouse's Race: Spouse's Marital Status: Spouse's Previous Husband's Name: Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M75225-9 System Origin: North Carolina-EASy GS Film number: 1760524 Reference ID:.

    3. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) North Carolina, Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868 [databaseonline], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000: Name: John Frost Gender: Male Spouse: Elizabeth Hunt Spouse Gender: Female Bond Date: 22 Mar 1817 Bond #: 000124979 Level Info: North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868 ImageNum: 003979 County: Rowan Record #: 01 144 Bondsman: R Powell Witness: R Powell.