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Rupert Otis McCLINTOCK

Male 1891 - 1973  (82 years)


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  • Name Rupert Otis McCLINTOCK 
    Born 19 Feb 1891  Cridersville, Auglaize County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Oct 1973  Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Rose Hill Memorial Park, Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • (1) Thoburn, Joseph B. and Wright, Muriel H., Oklahoma, a History of the State and its People, Vol. 4, New York, NY: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Inc., 1929, p. 569:

      R. OTIS McCLINTOCK - Having been engaged at different periods of his life in many lines of business activity, including the oil industry and banking, R. Otis McClintock is now president of the First National Bank and Trust Company, of Tulsa, Oklahoma. He has shown himself always eager to do whatever has been in his power to improve the prosperity and well-being of the citizens of this place, and there is no matter of public, civic, or social importance in which he is not deeply interested.

      Mr. McClintock was born at Cridersville, Ohio, on February 19, 1881, son of Frank G. and Gertrude McClintock. His father was an oil producer by occupation. R. Otis McClintock, of whom this is a record, received his early training in the public schools, and, when his family took up their home in Tulsa. Oklahoma, he studied in the high school in this city, from which he was graduated in the class of 1909. In that year, on June 10, he became engaged in field work with the Gypsy Oil Company, of Tulsa, with which he remained associated until November 1, 1913. On that date he went into the general oil business on his own account, and continued in this work until September 1, 1916. Then he became vice-president of the Gypsy Oil Company and the Gulf Pipe Line Company of Oklahoma, both of Tulsa, and remained with them until April 30, 1925. From then until December 10, 1927, he was vice-president of the Philmack Company, in which he also held a directorship; while on December 10, 1927, he became a vice-president and a director of the Independent Oil and Gas Company, of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Since October 1, 1928, Mr. McClintock has been in his present position as president of the First National Bank and Trust Company of Tulsa, in which he has held a directorship since 1918, and in whose affairs he has been constantly active. In his work as banker, as in all his previous activities, Mr. McClintock has shown the same excellent qualities of leadership and business talents that have gone into every enterprise with which he has been associated. A genial personality, combined with a constant consideration of other people and their points of view, have gone far toward making him a business and industrial leader.

      Along with his business and banking work, Mr. McClintock has been active in the socal and organizational activities of Tulsa and his State. In his political views he is identified prominently with the Republican party. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, in which order he is affiliated with Delta Lodge, No. 425, of Tulsa; the Indian Consistory of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, of MacAlester, in which he holds the thirty-second degree; and the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Tulsa. He also belongs to the Tulsa Club and the Tulsa Country Club. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, North, and his wife and son are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church.

      R. Otis McClintock married, on November 4, 1913, Gladys Belle Stebbins, daughter of Grant C. and Kate Stebbins. By this marriage there has been one son, Mac McClintock, born on September 6, 1914.

      (2) U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005:

      Name: R Olis McClintock [R Otis McClintock]
      City: Tulsa
      County: Tulsa
      State: Oklahoma
      Birthplace: Ohio
      Birth Date: 19 Feb 1891
      Race: Caucasian (White)
      Age: 26
      Occupation: Oil producer
      Nearest Relative: Wife and child
      Height/Build: Medium/Medium
      Color of Eyes/Hair: Blue/Light Brown
      Signature: R. Otis McClintock

      (3) A household headed by R. Otis McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1920 census of Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK, next to a household headed by his father, Frank G. McCLINTOCK.

      R. Otis is listed in the 1920 census as an oil producer who was then 28 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1892. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in OH.

      Listed with R. Otis is his wife, Gladys B., who was then 26 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1894. According to the 1920 census, she was born in IL, and both of her parents were born in IL.

      Also listed with R. Otis is his son, Frank G., who was then 5-4/12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1914. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OK, his father was born in OH, and his mother was born in IL. [His middle initial is listed as S. in the index to the 1920 census.]

      Also listed with R. Otis is an apparently unrelated black maid.

      (4) A household headed by Otis R. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1930 census of Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK.

      Otis R. is listed in the 1930 census as a bank president who was then 39 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1891. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in OH. According to the 1930 census, he was 22 years of age at his first marriage.

      Listed with Otis R. is his wife, Gladys, who was then 37 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1930 census, she was born in IL, her father was born in IL, and her mother was born in KS. According to the 1930 census, she was 20 years of age at her first marriage.

      Also listed with Otis R. is his son, Mac, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1915. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OK, his father was born in OH, and his mother was born in IL.

      Also listed with Otis R. is an apparently unrelated black cook.

      (5) A household headed by R. O. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1940 census of Lynn Lane Township, Tulsa County, OK.

      R. O. is listed in the 1940 census as a bank president who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1891. According to the 1940 census, he was born in OH. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

      Listed with R. O. is his wife, Gladys, who was then 47 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1940 census, she was born in IL. According to the 1940 census, her residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

      Also listed with R. O. are an apparently unrelated black chauffer and an apparently unrelated black maid.

      (6) Social Security Death Index:

      Name: R. McClintock
      SSN: 443-14-2257
      Last Residence: 74102 Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
      Born: 19 Feb 1891
      Died: Oct 1973
      State (Year) SSN issued: Oklahoma (Before 1951)

      (7) www.findagrave.com:

      Rupert Otis McClintock
      Birth: Feb. 19, 1891, Ohio, USA
      Death: Oct. 11, 1973, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA

      Family links: Parents: Frank Gartley McClintock (1863 - 1953), Gertrude Lacy Redinbaugh McClintock (1867 - 1921); Spouse: Gladys Bell Stebbins McClintock (1892 - 1965); Children: Frank Grant McClintock (1914 - 1985)

      Burial: Rose Hill Memorial Park, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA
      Plot: Abbey 3rd L-1500 Row C

      Created by: Chad Kendell
      Record added: May 27, 2011
      Find A Grave Memorial# 70454037

      (8) Susan Everly-Douze, The Tulsa World, April 23, 1989:

      The house that R. Otis McClintock built is a bricks and mortar testimonial to Tulsa's black gold heyday, the era that saw a boom town mature to a financially savvy city that earned its "Oil Capital" moniker not on drilling rig floors but in banks and board rooms.

      McClintock personified that transition. He was 15 in 1907 when his family was enticed to Tulsa by tales of the Glenn Pool's gushers. Hired on as a teen-age roustabout, he quickly grasped the business and became hugely successful. His business partners included Waite Phillips.

      It was oil naturally that bankrolled the house that McClintock built in 1931 just outside the city limits at 41st Street and Lewis Avenue.

      But the one-time roustabout who moved his family into the impressive new home wasn't a full-time oilman anymore. He was a banker, although an unwilling one.

      Because of his oil patch savvy, McClintock was recruited in 1928 as president of First National Bank & Trust Co., the city's oldest financial institution. He reluctantly accepted but for only one year, he insisted, until a replacement could be found.

      McClintock didn't know it then, but in fact, his oil patch days already were numbered. He would retire from the bank many decades later after gaining a national repution for his oil department.

      Tulsa's black gold boom had oil barons and bankers alike studding downtown with skyscrapers. Competing in grandness were the mansions they built for their families. For inspiration, they routinely looked to the villas, manors and chateaus of Europe. McClintock was no exception.

      Waite Phillips opted for an Italian Renaissance-style villa completed in 1928. So did fellow oilman-philanthropist and Oklahoma Gov. E.W. Marland who built his "mansion on the prairie" in Ponca City.

      McClintock's fancy was a French countryside estate. He built that dream house in 1931 despite the Depression which brought soup lines and "We Want Work" parades to Tulsa streets.

      In New York bankers were jumping out of windows. Financial times became tough in Tulsa too, but in the new McClintock residence, the mood was said to reflect the comraderie of high-stakes oilman rather than fretting, mutton-chopped bankers. In fact, the very walls of the house literally thumbed their noses at the financial bad times. Long-time friends recall that McClintock one day invited his cronies to bring over their stocks and bonds rendered worthless by the stock market crash and plaster them to a wall.

      Unfortunately for McClintock's decor, some of the paper eventually regained value. His friends returned to rip down the makeshift decorations, leaving the new homeowner grousing about his ruined wall.

      In a town of powerful men, McClintock was one of the most powerful. He was called "Mr. First." Much crucial business entertaining, particularly the luring of American Airlines from the East Coast to Tulsa, centered at his home. Be it champagne receptions in the elegant French drawing room or chili suppers in the club room, invitations to the McClintocks were highly sought after.

      That was a half century ago. This spring Tulsans don't need a special invitation to stroll through the same drawing room or head downstairs to the family club room. Steven and Tamara Smith, the third family to live in the 58-year-old home, are throwing open its doors. The occasion is the selection of the vintage home as this year's Designer Showcase, benefiting the Tulsa Philharmonic Orchestra. Some 37 interior designers and decorators have worked their craft. "It's an outstanding house, outstanding in its elegance and simplicity," says Smith, who describes the redo as "restoration and enhancement." No wall structure was altered except in the quarters.

      "We feel like we're helping to preserve Tulsa history by doing this," says Smith, head of Steeltek, Inc. on the city's west side.

      The family currently lives in Mannford, but Smith grew up two blocks from his new home. "I've always been fascinated by it," he says. "When we discovered it was empty, we decided to buy."

      As a nod to the home's French heritage, the family has rechristened the residence Chateau Smith.

      The residence is a singular architectural coup. It is Tulsa's only residence designed jointly by two of the city's premier architects, the late John Duncan Forsyth and Donald McCormick. To old-timers who still can pick out the countless Forsyth and McCormick houses in Tulsa's older nieghborhoods, they're simply "Jack and Mack," known best for their joint design of Southern Hills Country Club, again at the urging of McClintock. Forsyth, the son of a Scottish dry goods merchant, ran off from Edinburgh to Paris to study at the Sorbonne. There, he met John Russell Poe, famed for his design of large country estates.

      Oklahoma's legendary oilman E.W. Marland wanted a Poe-designed homestead, but Poe couldn't see himself venturing that far into the hinterlands, whatever the project or price. Instead, he recommended his young associate, Forsyth.

      Unlike Marland, however, McClintock wasn't satisfied with one architect, however highly touted.

      The banker also desired the design talents of McCormick, a young Philadelphia architect who came to Tulsa as supervising architect of the First Methodist Church.

      McCormick, now 90, who counts 30 churches among his portfolio of work, still remembers McClintock's pitch:

      "Otis said, 'I know you two may not want to work together, but I want you both. I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings.' As usual, Otis got his way."

      The temperments of Mack and Jack may not always have jived, but their combined talents produced a show stopper of a home. According to Tulsa architect John Brooks Walton, who as a young architect worked for Forsyth in the '50s, the McClintock home contained design features that Forsyth had originally conceived for the Marland mansion.

      "Forsyth told me that he really wanted to build a country French style home for Marland," Walton said. "But Marland had been to Italy, had seen houses he really liked, and wouldn't listen. Forsyth put ideas he couldn't use in Ponca City into the McClintock house."

      Typical of the French country style, the McCormick house sported a steeply pitched roof with heavy masonry construction. Inside the ceilings were high and the rooms were gracious. The interior had multiple split levels with an elegant eliptical staircase as the interior focal point. Everything for the home, from the chandeliers to the mouldings, was custom-made. Each of the bedrooms was actually a suite of rooms including a sleeping porch-sitting area, a dressing room and bath. In the sleeping porch of the master bedroom, the windows when open would disappear entirely down into the sills. The deco-styled fireplace in the son's bedroom was designed to contain a radio.

      Overall the style of the home was French country, but Forsyth could be a chameleon of style and it was obvious here in the McClintock home.

      In the library, for example, there was a nod to English style with Georgian keystone arches in the windows and shelves. Most decidedly English was the club room, reminiscent of a pub with an inglenook fireplace masssive enough to walk into.

      Fifty years have gone by, but Patricia Schmidlapp, now of Palm Beach and Paris, has fond memories of the club room. She grew up in Tulsa, watched the construction of the McClintock home. And it became her home for 10 years. For her the son's suite became the marital suite.
    Person ID I36113  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 5 Aug 2021 

    Father Frank Gartley McCLINTOCK,   b. Aug 1868, Auglaize County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 8 Apr 1940, Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Mother Gertrude Lacy REDINBAUGH,   b. 26 Dec 1867, Shelby County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Nov 1921, Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Family ID F15654  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Gladys Bell STEBBINS,   b. 29 Nov 1892, Manlius, Bureau County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Sep 1965, Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 4 Nov 1913 
    Children 
     1. Frank Grant McCLINTOCK, Sr.,   b. 6 Sep 1914, Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Sep 1985, Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    Last Modified 5 Aug 2021 
    Family ID F15626  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.