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Gen. Pancho VILLA

Male 1878 - 1923  (45 years)


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  • Name Pancho VILLA 
    Title Gen. 
    Born 5 Jun 1878  Río Grande, San Juan del Río, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 7 Jul 1878  Parroquia de San Francisco de Asisi, San Juan Del Río, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    AFN 4BZH-ZV 
    Burial Monumento a la Revolución, Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal, México [Disputed] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Name Francisco VILLA 
    Name José-Doroteo ARANGO ARÁMBULA 
    Died 20 Jul 1923  Parral, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Assassination 
    Buried Parral Cemetery, Hidalgo del Parral, Chihuahua, México [Disputed] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • (1) Source: Patricia M. Garcia .

      (2) "Pancho Villa," Encyclopædia Brittanica, 2010, © 2010 Encyclopædia Brittanica, Inc.:

      Pancho Villa, byname of Francisco Villa, original name Doroteo Arango (b. June 5, 1878, Hacienda de Río Grande, San Juan del Río, Mexico - d. June 20, 1923, Parral), Mexican revolutionary and guerrilla leader, who fought against the regimes of both Porfirio D??az and Victoriano Huerta and after 1914 engaged in civil war and banditry.

      Villa was the son of a field labourer and was orphaned at an early age. In revenge for an assault on his sister, he killed one of the owners of the estate on which he worked and was afterward forced to flee to the mountains, where he spent his adolescence as a fugitive.

      In 1909 Villa joined Francisco Madero's uprising against the dictator of Mexico, Porfirio Díaz. During the rebellion, Villa, who lacked a formal education but had learned to read and write, displayed his talents as soldier and organizer. Combined with his intimate knowledge of the land and the people of northern Mexico, these gifts enabled him to place at Madero's disposal a division of trained soldiers under his command. After the success of the revolution, Villa remained in the irregular army.

      In 1912, during the rebellion of Pascual Orozco, Villa aroused the suspicion of General Victoriano Huerta, who condemned him to death, but Madero ordered a stay of execution and sent Villa to prison instead. Villa escaped from prison in November and fled to the United States. After Madero's assassination in 1913, Villa returned to Mexico and formed a military band of several thousand men that became known as the famous División del Norte (Division of the North). Combining his force with that of Venustiano Carranza, Villa revolted against the increasingly repressive and inefficient dictatorship of Huerta, once again revealing his military talents by winning several victories. In December 1913 Villa became governor of the state of Chihuahua and with Carranza won a decisive victory over Huerta in June 1914. Together they entered Mexico City as the victorious leaders of a revolution.

      Rivalry between Villa and Carranza, however, soon led to a break between the two, and Villa was forced to flee Mexico City with the revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata in December 1914. Badly defeated by Carranza in a series of battles, he and Zapata fled to the mountains of the north. But in order to demonstrate that Carranza did not control northern Mexico, Villa executed some 17 U.S. citizens at Santa Isabel in January 1916 and two months later attacked Columbus, New Mexico, killing about 17 Americans. President Woodrow Wilson then sent an expedition under General John J. Pershing to that area, but, because of Villa's popularity and intimate acquaintance with the terrain of northern Mexico and because of the Mexican government's dislike of Pershing's presence on Mexican soil, it proved impossible to capture Villa.

      Villa continued his guerrilla activities as long as Carranza remained in power. After the overthrow of Carranza's government in 1920, Villa was granted a pardon and a ranch near Parral, Chihuahua, in return for agreeing to retire from politics. Three years later he was assassinated on his ranch.

      (3) The New York Times, July 21, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

      FEUDISTS SLAY VILLA, AVENGING EXECUTION OF HERRERA FAMILY
      -
      Six Men Ambush His Auto Near Parral - Kill Three of His Escort Also.
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      TROOPS TAKE 3 OF SLAYERS
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      Brother Is Believed to Have Squared With Old Rebel Chief for Deaths of Four of Kin.
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      POLITICAL PLOT HATCHING
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      Threat of New Revolt Removed as Villa for First Time Fails to Beat Foe in Drawing Gun.
      -
      Copyright ©, 1923, by The New York Times Company.
      Special Cable to The New York Times.

      MEXICO CITY, July 20. - Francisco (Pancho) Villa and his secretary, Colonel Miguel Trillo, were assassinated early this morning by six feudist foes while he was motoring from Parral to Guanajuato. Three members of his escort were also slain. The men suddenly opened rifle fire from ambush on each side of the roadway.

      As Villa's car entered the suburb of Guadalupe, near Parral, a group of mounted men opened fire, instantly killing Villa, Trillo, the chauffeur and two bodyguards. After the car stopped the men dismounted and emptied their .45 calibre pistols into Villa's body.

      The Government, it is announced tonight, will administer Villa's ranch in behalf of his children, who will be considered as wards of the Government.

      Today is the third anniversary of Villa's surrender to De La Huerta and Parral is the place where he ambushed a body of American troops in the Spring of 1916.

      Official dispatches from Canutillo brought the news to the capital, where it was received with relief. It was accepted as life answering for life. Villa executed the father and three brothers of Francisco Herrera, a political and military leader who swore vengeance for his kin. Members of the family made many attempts to consummate their revenge, and today's ending of the bandit's career is attributed to them.

      Villa's death had been predicted for months, as a number of his old followers had become disgusted and deserted service at the ranch where he reigned like a feudal baron.

      Ends Danger of Revolution.

      Government officials refused to comment on the killing pending the arrival of details, but according to public opinion Villa's death removes the danger of another revolution when the elections are held and also removes the essential backing of one candidate who could give General Calles real opposition.

      Although Villa had been apparently living peacefully at his Canutillo ranch, he was always thought dangerous to the stability of the Government. Recently he had made statements that he would take part in the next Presidential campaign, supporting Raoul Madero, brother of Francisco Madero, who was assassinated while President. Madero commanded a brigade under Villa.

      This avowal caused alarm throughout Mexico, as it is known that when ballots failed him Villa had no scruples against using bullets to achieve his end. With the backing of Villa and his followers, Madero was strong, but now that this support is gone his candidacy is believed impossible.

      Villa's record of violence made him dangerous at all times during the past ten years. The peons of the North idolized him as the champion of their class.

      During the past three years Villa had overcome the handicap of illiteracy. He had teachers at Canutillo, and took daily lessons in the use of the typewriter for official correspondence.

      Villa was of a suspicious nature, and this enabled him to avoid death many times. Being quicker on the trigger Villa personally killed many of his subordinates who made what he thought were treacherous moves.

      (4) The New York Times, July 21, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

      Swore Vengeance for Four Herreras.

      CHIHUAHUA CITY, Mexico, July 20 (Associated Press). - One hundred troops under command of General Eugenio Martinez arrived at Parral tonight to hunt for the assassins of Francisco Villa and his four followers. Troops from the command of General Jose C. Escobar were coming from Torreon to help in the pursuit.

      While the assassins are unidentified, two theories are being worked on by officials here. Villa had many enemies, and probably hundreds of men have sworn to take his life, but he had no enemy as bitter, according to his friends, as Francisco Herrera.

      Herrera hated Villa not without cause. Villa is claimed to have practically exterminated the Herrera family, at one time prominent in the military and political circles of Mexico.

      Villa in 1914 had two Generals who were brothers, Maclovio Herrera, who commanded the left wing of the army, and Melchor, who commanded the right.

      Melchor, who was former Mayor of Juarez, was killed mysteriously on the border. The circumstances were suspicious and friends of the Herrera family blamed Villa. This was in the latter part of 1914.

      Maclovio, his father, José de la Luz Herrera, and a younger Herrera were led to a graveyard in Parral on Easter morning in 1915 and executed. Villa was blamed for this.

      Francisco was the only male member of the prominent family left and swore revenge, it is said. Only last year Villa asked protection of the Federal Government from Herrera and his followers. Herrera is a Government official at Gomez Palacion, Durango, not far from Parral.

      The Government, local officials say, will question the possibility of Herrera's friends taking up the old feud.

      LIVED AND DIED FIGHTING.

      Villa Was a Ruthless Bandit to Foes, but a Patriot to Peons.

      A ruthless bandit to the outside world, but in the eyes of his followers a high-minded patriot who was fearless in his service to his country, Francisco "Pancho" Villa died as he had lived - amid fighting and bloodshed. Nearly all of his fifty-five years of life were chapters of adventure, and it was only three years ago that he climbed out of the saddle and nettled down to the life of a peace-abiding citizen near San Pedro, Coahuila.

      From the night in the Summer of 1894 when he killed a man and fled to the hills, Villa was the bandit chieftain extraordinary. He fought all Mexican Administrations and swept the north of that country, at the head of his ragged thousands, into subjection to banditry. He outwitted General Pershing when Washington sent an expeditionary force to pursue him after the massacre at Columbus, N. M., displaying some of the military genius that had characterized his years of outlawry.

      That Villa had skill as a military leader, even his enemies admitted. He had a rare turn for organization, which gave his forces the semblance or drilled troops, and he could go through a country for long distances with little inconvenience or delay.

      Supplementing this military talent, however, was the dread in which Villa was held by the peasantry. Anything that Villa wanted, he got. The peasants knew that Villa would execute any one who opposed him or his soldiers.

      As a result of stories that told of his fighting methods, Villa became known as a man without a conscience. He was pictured as slaying without compunction hundreds of captives, and of practicing horrible forms of torture. His attitude toward women, especially, brought him condemnation.

      Yet, to newspaper correspondents who managed to get to the "Chief," he seemed a harmless enough individual. Only a few months ago he gave a woman correspondent the impression of a dreamer, a simple-minded, soft-spoken gentleman intent only upon the welfare of Mexico.

      Peon Cowboy Kills His First Man.

      Villa was born in 1688 [sic; should be 1878] in Las Nievas, State of Durango, and was christened Doreteo Orango. His father was a mixture of Spanish and Mexican Indian; his mother was a full Indian. The Orangos were peons and were of the poorest of the poor in the little mining town.

      Schooling was expensive and far beyond the family purse, so that Villa grew up and went to work, unable to read and with writing ability limited to his own name.

      Eventually Villa became a butcher - they called him the Butcher In later life, but for a different reason - but finding that cowpunching offered wider range, he took service on a ranch. When Villa was twenty-six years old he was working near Chihuahua. One night in the adobe rendezvous of the Chihuahua sporting fraternity, an army officer playing at the same table with the young cowpuncher, questioned his play.

      Orango smiled. Encouraged by the silence of the cowboy, the officer called Orango a cheat. The cowboy shot him dead across the table.

      That was the start of "Francisco Villa" the bandit. He jumped on the horse tied outside the gamblers' hut and headed for the hills. Gradually he gathered around him a gang of adventurers and criminals. When his bandit force was strong enough, Villa began his raids. From the outset he was exceptionally successful. Himself a man who never drank or smoked, Villa insisted upon the strictest sort of discipline among his followers.

      Stays Bandit Partner.

      Time and again President Diaz sent detachments into the north country seeking to capture Villa, but each time the elusive outlaw managed to escape. Several of the pursuing detachments were wiped out when Villa trapped them.

      In the end a high price was set upon his head, and when this was reported to Villa he strode into the plaza in Chihuahua and defied any one to seize him for the capture money.

      In 1907 Villa formed a partnership with an outlaw known as Francisco Reza, They launched on a large scale a campaign of cattle stealing In the State of Chihuahua, rustling the stolen cattle into the United States. On the American side the two bandits would round up mules and horses and sell them in Mexico.

      This patrnership [sic] did not last very long because Villa had a disagreement with Reza and killed him in broad daylight while they were sitting on a bench in the city plaza in Chihuahua.

      This murder threatened to divide Villa's band, but such was his personality that eventually the Reza followers enlisted with the slayer of their chief. Reinforced, Villa broadened the scope of his thievery and became a veritable terror to the rich land owners and mining men of Northern Chihuahua, robbing them left and right and sharing the spoils with his men and the impoverished peasantry. This trick of caring for the peons gave Villa a Robin Hood character in their eyes.

      Career as Revolutionist.

      It was not until 1910, however, that Villa became a military leader. In that year the Madero revolution against Diaz developed and Villa cast his forces in with the revolutionists. He mastered the northern part of Mexico, but in one of the many small engagements Villa fell into the hands of the Federalistas.

      General Victoriano Huerta promptly dispatched the notorious bandit leader to Mexico City to stand trial for his crimes. He was tried by a military court-martial for insubordination and was sentenced to death. The sentence was commuted to imprisonment, and Villa, with the aid of confederates, escaped and fled into Texas.

      Drifting back and forth over the border and staging an occasional raid, Villa passed two years in what was inaction for him. In 1913, however, events transpired in Mexico which brought Villa back into power again. Madero was assassinated and Huerta became dictator.

      Huerta's elevation failed to find favor in some factions of Mexican political life and General Emilio Carranza organized and led a revolution to banish Huerta. His capture by Huerta had never ceased to rankle Villa, and when he heard of the movement against his enemy he was overjoyed.

      Re-entering Mexico, Villa called for recruits to an army to invade Mexico City and "dislodge the tyrant," and soon had 35,000 men under his colors. The "army," however, was a ragged, undisciplined horde and it took Villa months to whip it into some semblance of efficiency.

      Men Hail "Cockroach" Chief.

      The Villistas were ardent in their devotion to their chief. He was known affectionately as "La Cucaracha"- or "the cockroach."

      Finally, at Ojinaga Villa met the Federal forces, swept the field said sent close to 5,000 of the Huerta troops, including a number of Generals, in full flight across the border, where they were interned. This marked the beginning of a series of triumphs for Villa and also led to the development of jealousy between him and Carranza.

      This feeling smoIdered for some time and when Huerta had been put to rout and Carranza marched in victory into Mexico City, Villa proclaimed a state of war between Carranza and himself. He found that Emili Zapata, a bandit of the oil fields, also hated Carranza and the outlaws joined their forces to harass the constitutionalist regime. Overcoming a feeble resistance, the bandits entered Mexico City, while Carranza fled to Vera Cruz.

      Reaches Peak of Military Glory.

      This marked the peak of Villa's prestige as a commander. General Alvaro Obregon, now President of Mexico, led an army out to meet the bandits. In three successive engagements he defeated the united forces of Villa and Zapata, losing an arm in one of the battles. The bandit army was utterly routed and Villa fled with the remnants of his followers over the mountains to Sonora.

      But Villa's power for mischief-making was only temporarily obscured. On March 6, 1916, when Villa was boasting that he had from 3,000 to 6,000 men in his outlaw army, came his raid on Columbus, N. M. The bandits crept into the border town just before dawn. Before the 1,500 Villistas were driven back seventeen Americans had been killed and seven wounded. Eight of the dead were from the Thirteenth United States Cavalry, a squadron of which pursued the bandits for five miles into Mexico. About 100 of the bandits were killed.

      The direct result of the raid was the dispatch of an American expeditionary force under General Pershing upon a "dead or alive" chase after Villa. This pursuit lasted nine months and cost about $100,000,000. It ended with Villa, although often reported dead, very much alive.

      Shot Down by Americans at Parral.

      In one battle at Parral - by a coincidence, near the very spot where Villa yielded up his life yesterday - the American doughboys were ambushed. A number of American soldiers were killed and wounded before a charge resulted in precipitate flight by the bandits. Ten days later the Americans overtook the major portion of Villa's army at Guerrere and administered a sound defeat.

      It was in this fight that Villa was shot three times in the leg. For weeks he hovered between life and death, with only his two cousins as attendants in a cave where he had taken refuge. On April 4, 1916, while the hunt was on for him, Villa was indicted at Deming, N. M., for first degree murder in connection with the Columbus raid.

      Villa, when his leg was well again went on the bandit warpath, but his power had waned. In July, 1920, he and 900 of his followers surrendered at Sabinas, as nearly 10,000 Federal soldiers under General Eugenio Martinez hemmed him in. Even then Villa got virtually his own terms, including $2,000,000 in gold as pay for himself and his men, and a small farm for each bandit.

      Villa got the ranch of Canutillo for himself. Denying complicity in the Columbus raid and announcing allegiance to Mexico City, he settled down as a farmer, equipped his farm with the latest American farming machinery and purchased a Ford. His first wife had died in Texas and the second Mrs. Villa, a woman of about thirty-five, settled down with him and the children - Augustin, 11 years old, Octavio, 9 years old, and two girls.

      (5) New York Times, July 22, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

      KILLING OF VILLA HASTENS CRISIS
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      Political Climax Now Expected in Rivalry of Three for Mexican Presidency.
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      HELD BALANCE OF POWER
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      Slain Chieftain Made Host of Enemies in Calles Group During Last Week of His Life.
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      Special to The New York Times.

      WASHINGTON, July 21. - It is not altogether improbable that the assassination of General Francisco (Pancho) Villa and his Secretary, Colonel Trillo, will contribute toward effecting a climax before long, perhaps within a week, in the Mexican situation, which is daily growing more involved through the hot fight being waged for the nomination of a successor to General Obregon as President. Villa had thousands of admirers throughout Chihuahua and Northern Mexico who would have followed him into the field, and it is learned that many of them resent the manner in which he was killed.

      The assassination of Villa came as no surprise to men in Washington who have been closely watching the triangular fight for the Mexican Presidential nomination. The candidates already in the field are Plutarca [sic; should be Plutarco] Elias Calles, Adolfo de la Huerta and General Raul Madero. Calles is Minister of the Interior, de la Huerta is Minister of Finance and Madero is a brother of the late Francisco Madero.

      Calles is the candidate of the radicals and Communists, whose clubs throughout Mexico have been endorsing him. De la Huerta has not openly announced his candidacy, but his adherents have been constantly growing in number. Raul Madero was a General in the Division of the North under Villa, commanded the once famous Zaragoza brigade, is an American college graduate and popular in the northern tier of States where Villa ruled.

      While General Obregon has been neutral and insisting on an honest count - and the election, moreover, is not to be held for a year - the contest already has become so hectic that trouble has been produced in the States of San Luis Potosi, Durango, Coahuila and Neuvo Leon and is spreading into Chihuahua.

      Villa was closly [sic] watching the manoeuvres, and acquainted close friends that he purposed [sic] to have "something to say" in the Presidential campaign. It was then believed he might throw the weight of his very considerable influence in Northern and Central Mexico in favor of Raul Madero or Adolfo de la Huerta.

      Villa last week let it be known, however, that, while not opposed to Raul Madero, he was more disposed to favor de la Huerta inasmuch as he considered Calles as far from fitted for the Presidency, even to the extent that if Calles were inaugurated Villa would feel disposed to leave the country.

      Some believe that If Villa had not been killed he would have held the balance of power in the Presidential situation. The attitude of Villa was such that his bitter opposition to Calles was rapidly making him enemies among the latter's supporters.

      (6) New York Times, July 23, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

      FRANCISCO VILLA.

      PANCHO VILLA in life would have dreaded nothing more than lying in state after death with throngs pressing round his bier. He had long carried the stigma of bandit, but he was really one of Mexico's strong men, although illiterate and undisciplined. In a way, VILLA, for all his excesses, lawlessness, crimes and escapades, was a moving example of talents running to waste for want of common schooling. An educated VILLA might have been President of the republic. To some he was a monster, utterly cruel and revengeful; to others a patriot by instinct and a reformer in the rough. One of the most sterling of American soldiers, General HUGH L. SCOTT, had an esteem for FRANCISCO VILLA that he never disguised.

      It is reported that when President OBREGON heard of VILLA'S death showed agitation and said: "He was my enemy once, but I defeated him and he proved a worthy enemy. His death affects me more than I care to say." It is probably true. When OBREGON sought VILLA in the field to heal the feud with CARRANZA it was like putting one's head in the lion's jaws. OBREGON had been warned that he would fall before a firing squad, and there were anxious moments for him until VILLA's emotional nature burst out into professions of friendship for his old enemy, because he had presented himself without arms on so perilous a mission. "The manly and courageous attitude of OBREGON," says a historian of the revolution, "conquered VILLA, who instead of ordering an execution gave a ball in his honor."

      FRANCISCO VILLA was never so black as he was painted, nor did he receive credit for abilities of a high order and for doglike fidelity to MADERO, in whose integrity he implicitly believed. For a long while he was loyal to CARRANZA. But when VILLA found that VENUSTIANO had feet of clay, there was a breach that nobody could mend. Even OBREGON, who saw things more clearly than VILLA, could not endure CARRANZA and overthrew him for the good of Mexico. No American had a better opportunity to study VILLA the man, his weaknesses and redeeming qualities, than JOHN REED, a born reporter, who campaigned with him, witnessed his rulership of Chihuahua and had access to him at all times. REED brought out the humanity and humor of the man, his sympathy with the peons, his simplicity, the struggles of his clouded intellect with economic and State problems.

      When, as REED says, as Military Governor of Chihuahua, VILLA created "a government for 300,000 people out of his head," he exhibited homespun wisdom that redeemed his blunders. He burned his fingers when he meddled with finance, but he had "a passion for schools." He established fifty of them in the city. He put his army to work to run the street railways, the electric light plant, the telephones, the water works. He started flour mills and slaughter houses. He closed the saloons, had a drunken soldier shot as an example. "The only thing to do with soldiers in time, of peace," said VILLA, the Governor, "is to put them
      to work. An idle soldier is always thinking of war." Land reform was one of his hobbies. With a stroke of his pen he seized for the Constitutionalist Government 17,000,000 acres belonging to the Terrazzas family.

      Pomp and ceremony VILLA hated. He refused to be lionized. When told by military sycophants that he could have any office in Mexico, he said: "I am a fighter, not a statesman. I am not educated enough to be President. I learned to read and write only two years ago." General SCOTT one day sent VILLA the Rules of War adopted by The Hague conference. "What is this Hague conference?" he asked. "What is the difference between civilized war and any other kind of war?" It was before the great war. Nevertheless, VILLA had a good field hospital, "and took care of the Federal wounded just as well as of his own men." He fed starving populations with an auxiliary supply train that kept pace with his army. One of VILLA'S sayings was: "When the new republic is established there will never be any more army in Mexico. Armies are the greatest support of tyranny. There can be "no dictator without an army." After the worst has been said of FRANCISCO VILLA, after his crimes have been proved and his vices passed in review, the reflection is provoked that in a progressive and enlightened Mexico he might have been a useful servant of the State.

      (7) The New York Times, July 25, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

      VILLA KILLING STARTS POLITICAL WARFARE
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      Parties in Pre-election Excitement Accuse Each Other of Plotting Murder.
      -
      Copyright ©, 1923, by The New York Times Company. Special Cable to THE NEW YORK TIMES.

      MEXICO CITY, July 24. - The killing of Pancho Villa is still an exciting topic in Mexico City. Politicians are worrying about its effect on the next political campaign, which starts in September. Charges are hurled back and forth by the different parties, who accuse each other of having plotted the murder.

      One of the many stories circulating here is that the opposition party has proof that the same man who is supposed to have arranged the killing of Lucio Blanco was seen in the State of Chihuahua a few days before the death of Villa.

      One party, composed of former Carranzistas, say Villa's death was planned in order to prevent his joining their party, as they say that Villa, was opposed to the candidacy of General Calles.

      Another party, known as the Liberals, claim that Villa, when advised of the decision of Secretary De la Huerta not to be a candidate, announced that he personally might try. That Villa tried to persuade De la Huerta to accept the nomination is well known. It is also known that Villa was annoyed when De la Huerta. absolutely declined to take part and threatened to leave the country if nominated, as he did not have the ambition to serve again.

      Turning from De la Huerta, Villa then took up the cause of Raoul Madero until he was convinced that Madero was a bad bet. Then, it is said, Villa asked his own followers why he personally could not hold the chair.

      The general opinion in Mexico City is that the Government gained politically through the death of Villa, but lost a good soldier in case a new movement breaks out.

      A group headed by several Generals held a meeting in Mexico City last night and drafted a manifesto to the public deploring the death of Villa and demanding certain guarantees by the Government that the Presidential elections will be absolutely free. This was no surprise, as the leaders are known to be in opposition to the Obregon Government.

      President Obregon has publicly stated several times that he is not interested in his successor, but only wanted the people to elect one according to their own wishes. The Government will not take part in the elections except to see that no violations occur. In a circular Obregon warned soldiers of all grades that they are liable to punishment if found taking any part in politics.

      Mexico City expects a warm time at the convention in September, which will perhaps resemble the convention at Aguacaliente when Villa broke with Carranza.

      (8) The New York Times, July 30, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

      Army of Children Claim Villa's Estate; 7,000,000 Pesos in Buried Treasure Sought
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      MEXICO CITY, July 29 (Associated Press.) - The fight of his numerous widows and children for the estate of Francisco Villa, slain bandit chieftain, promises to become as exciting as the search for the 7,000,000 pesos which "Pancho" is popularly reported to have buried in the vicinity of Parral.

      Reports from Chihuahua state that Villa had a presentiment of death several weeks before his assassination, and wrote to several of his wives, promising them shares of his estate. Thus far five wives and a small army of children have filed claims, in addition to his brother Hipolito and his sister Mariana.

      The wives who have filed claims are as follows:

      Esther Cardona of Chihuahua, who has two children; Paula Alamillo of Torreon, no children; Soledad R. De Villa of Canutillo, one son; Petra Espinosa of Santa Barbara, one son; and Austreberta Renteria, Canutillo, one son.

      Claims also have been filed by:

      A daughter, Maria, of Canutillo, mother unknown; a son by Juana Torres, who died recently in Los Angeles; a son by the late Guadalupe Coss, whose father Villa slew; a son by the late Asuncion R. De Villa, Canutillo.

      More than a dozen other children in Parral and Canutillo claim the bandit chieftain as their father, alleging that their mothers were kidnapped by him and never reappeared.

      Reports of the buried treasure are believed by the authorities to be without foundation.

      (9) Newport Mercury, Newport, RI, September 15, 1923, p. 6:

      WIVES OF VILLA TELL ROMANCES
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      Women in Various Parts of Mexico to Claim Estate Worth Millions.
      -
      Torreon, Mexico. - Just how many wives did Francisco Villa have?

      The question, for years a subject for speculation as one Mrs. Villa after another was heard of, suddenly ceased to be academic when the former bandit leader was killed on his ranch in Durango recently.

      From an outlaw with no estate save the price on his head, Villa had become a large landholder, and his legal wife and children presumably can claim a large inheritance.

      Several alleged wives have already emerged from obscurity, and inquiries In Chihuahua, Durango and along the Mexican border indicate that several more will probably will do so. He is generally credited there with ten of them.

      Separated on Nuptial Day.

      A few days after the bandit chief's death a correspondent visited Mrs. Luz Corral Villa at Chihuahua City. Mrs. Luz Villa is of a type rare among Mexicans, a blue-eyed, golden-haired, magnificently built woman, with poise and personality. She is about thirty-six years old, and well educated. After her marriage she added to her education the accomplishments of painting and the piano.

      She was married to "General" Villa, as she always calls him, in 1908, in the Catholic church at San Andres, Mexico, she told the correspondent. They then went to Chihuahua to be married by the court, but before the ceremony could be performed Villa was captured and taken to Mexico City. Upon his return to Chihuahua several months later they were married by the court.

      Villa built a beautiful quinta for her on Tenth street in Chihuahua, of which the furnishings alone cost 60,000 pesos or more, she said, and lavished gorgeous jewelry and luxuries upon her. She claims he always spoke of her to his friends as his "only love."

      In 1910, during the trouble over the shooting of Americans, Villa sent Dona Luz to the United States for safety, where she remained until 1920.

      Villa and Dona Luz had no children, she says, but during most of the time she was in the United States she took care of and educated three of his children, whose mothers were unknown to her.

      In 1920 she returned to Mexico, and lived with Villa at Canutillo, his immense ranch. A few days after she arrived there, she declares, Villa brought another wife, Esther Cradone [sic; should be Cardona], into the house.

      Sent Mistress to Another Town.

      Nominally however, the large fair Dona Luz triumphed. She told Villa she would leave him if he did not send Esther away, and he yielded. But he sent her only as far as Chihuahua.

      The correspondent saw her there a few days ago, at Avenue Penitenciaria, No. 817. "Every time Villa came to Chihuahua he visited me," she declared: "and every time I received money from him."

      With Esther gone, peace returned to the ranch at Canutillo: but not for long. One day a letter came addressed to Villa in a woman's hand. It read: The lawyer that you sent was here to see my father, but my father is against our marriage because he believes you are already married. If you can prove the contrary, speak with my uncle, who lives in Parrel [sic; should be Parral]." It was signed, "Austaberta [sic; should be Austreberta] Renteria."

      Dona Luz knew the girl, she says. Austaberta [sic] had once told her that Villa had tortured her father by burning his feet off. Villa never got that letter, Dona Luz admits frankly.

      New Favorite Ousts Wife.

      But neither her influence nor suppression of the letter which had come into her hands could keep Villa from acquiring the new wife on whom he had his eyes. However he managed it, he presently brought Austaberta [sic] to Canutillo. Dona Luz protested in vain; they quarreled; he told her to leave, and she left penniless, according to her story.

      Villa, it is said, had a son by Austaberta [sic], who is still Iiving with his mother at Canutillo. She is believed to be the last wife with whom Villa lived.

      Both Esther and Dona Luz say their husband was always good to them in his way, never unkind, and that he always provided well for them. They say, too, that his main thought was the education of his children.

      Still another wife was found at Torreon, Coahuila. She is Paula Alamillo de Villa, young still, dark and slender, with magnificent eyes.

      She married Villa in 1914, when she was only fourteen years old. Her little girl, Evangeline, is now eight years old. She told a simple and straightforward story.

      Dreaded by Girl's Parents.

      "When Pancho Villa took possession of Torreon with his rebel horde," she said, "he saw me, in spite of the fact that wherever he went, all girls were immediately hidden from sight on account of the extreme dread with which all parents beheld him. Shortly afterward he secured my address. Although at that time I was only fourteen years old, Villa came to see my father and asked him for my hand in formal marriage, as is customary in this country, and offered my father $30,000, United States money, to assure his future from want.

      "In spite of this offer my father, knowing Villa's reputation, did not hesitate to turn the offer down. Villa's answer was that be always got what he wanted, and since he had the power necessary in this case, he would take me by force. This threat was immediately carried out, and Villa, with pistol in hand, forcibly married me. Just before the ceremony, probably as a sort of bribe to make me more friendly toward him, he gave me $5,000 American money to buy suitable clothes with.

      Says Villa Was Generous.

      "As long as Villa stayed in Torreon and lived with me, which was about a year, he treated me with every consideration, and gave me 500 pesos a month for expenses. It was toward the end of this year that our little daughter was born. Villa showed great love for her, and named her Evangeline.

      "The end of our short romance came when the federal troops drove Villa to the mountains in 1915, and I and my baby were left in Torreon with no means of support. I had to go to work as a seamstress, although I had never done such work before.

      "In 1921, when Villa surrendered to General Martinez, I hurried to Tiahualilo to see him, and he gave me some money and assured me my troubles were all over. He promised he would send some one to Torreon to arrange for a residence for me, but this promise was never kept.

      Expects to Be Left Out.

      "In spite of all that has happened I must say that throughout our relationship Villa was always very kind to me and seemed to want me to love him, or at least return in part his own love for me.

      "At present I do not know what arrangements he has made for me and the little girl, but I do not think we will get anything from his very rich estate."

      The story of Juana Torres de Villa has been told in several ways. She was a beautiful girl of pure Spanish stock, educated in the North. Her family became impoverished and she took a position in a store at Torreon, where Villa saw her in 1913. He seized her. She told him she would kill herself unless he married her, and he willingly went through the ceremony. According to most of the stories, she grew to love her captor. A baby girl was born, and Villa sent mother and child to Los Angeles.

      Death Reported in Los Angeles.

      It was reported in 1917 that she had gone to Chihuahua in the hope of rejoining him, and had been captured by the Carranzistas when they took the city, sent to Mexico City, and there shot by Villa's enemies.

      Later reports, however, told of her death in Los Angeles. The child has lived at the Canutillo ranch since then.

      Four other children of Villa are said to be known, with their mothers, all of whom are living in Canutillo. Several more women who have lived with Villa at various times now live in El Paso, and have signified their intention of asking for a share of the estate. - New York World.

      (10) Naylor, Roger, The Arizona Republic, August 15, 2015:

      Pancho Villa

      From reality star to headless ghost?

      Douglas, Ariz., had close-up look at bandit-turned-revolutionary

      Long before anyone had dreamed up "Survivor," "Dancing With the Stars" or anything starring a Kardashian, one of the first reality stars was Pancho Villa.

      The most charismatic - and controversial - personality to emerge from the Mexican Revolution, Francisco "Pancho" Villa was a bandit with political savvy and a craving for publicity. He seemed invincible, winning many decisive victories. He loved being photographed and even signed a contract with Hollywood's Mutual Film Co. to have several of his battles filmed.

      "Villa was darn good at using the media for promotional purposes," says Cindy Hayostek, vice president of the Douglas Historical Society. "He was a violent man with a terrible temper but he knew how to publicize himself to achieve his aims on both sides of the border."

      For many crucial moments of the Mexican Revolution, residents of Douglas had front-row seats.

      The fraudulent election of 1910 initiated by Mexican President Porfirio Diaz spurred opposition leader Francisco Madero to call for revolution. During the decades-long rule of Diaz, Mexico had modernized, but the vast majority of the country's wealth rested in the hands of a powerful few, creating extreme economic and social inequality.

      The uprising began Nov. 20, 1910, with Madero's call to arms and swept across the country. One of the early battles took place on Douglas' doorstep.

      In April 1911, fighting broke out in Agua Prieta, Sonora, just across the border from Douglas. Madero sympathizers attacked Diaz troops as Douglas residents gathered, despite whizzing bullets, to watch. The rebels defeated the federal troops, a crushing blow to Diaz, who was deposed and fled the country a few weeks later.

      Madero was elected president and had a loyal general in Villa. Unfortunately, Madero had made other enemies, and when promised reforms were not delivered, he was assassinated in 1913. Civil war broke out across Mexico.

      Early on, the United States supported Villa and supplied him with weapons. But that era was short-lived. After military setbacks for Villa and the threat of continued instability, President Woodrow Wilson decided to recognize Venustiano Carranza as Mexico's president. Carranza was determined to eliminate Villa.

      The second battle of Agua Prieta occurred in autumn 1915 as Villa and his men advanced on the border town defended by one of Carranza's generals, Plutarco Elias Calles, another future president of Mexico.

      "Villa was on a bit of a downhill slide," Hayostek says. "He needed a victory to recover his former glory. And he needed to gain control of a border town so he'd have a U.S. supply point."

      But it was not to be. Villa, considered a brilliant tactician and commanding an elite cavalry, was caught on the wrong side of history. His 19th-century-style warfare was suddenly outdated against the technological advancements imported from the battlefields of World War I in Europe.

      Villa arrived to find Agua Prieta fortified with deep trenches, barbed wire, machine-gun nests and land mines. He waited until after midnight Nov. 1 to attack. But as he made his nighttime charge, huge searchlights clicked on, illuminating the battlefield. Villa's cavalry was ravaged by machine-gun fire. He was forced to retreat, leaving behind thousands of dead.

      In Douglas, separated from Agua Prieta only by a wire fence, bullets and shells flew through town, scarring buildings and wounding U.S. soldiers who had been deployed to border towns since the revolution began, tasked with safeguarding Americans and keeping the fighting from spilling across the line. Camp Douglas was formed after hostilities broke out in 1910. During the fighting in Agua Prieta, Pvt. Harry J. Jones was killed by a bullet. Soon after, the base was renamed Camp Harry J. Jones and remained so until it was closed in 1933.

      "Once Villa lost in Agua Prieta, he was never a power again," Hayostek says. "Calles, who won the battle, would go on to become president and would form the PRI party that dominated Mexican politics until 2000. Everything changed for Mexico after that battle."

      Villa felt betrayed by the United States, and he staged a raid on Columbus, N.M., in 1916. Several civilians were killed and buildings were burned before he was driven off. In response, President Wilson unleashed the Punitive Expedition, a column of troops led by Gen. John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing, who pursued Villa across the Mexican countryside until 1917.

      Pershing never caught the wily Villa, but his ceaseless hounding took a toll. Left with just a handful of men, Villa finally made peace with the Mexican government and retired to a large hacienda until he was gunned down in 1923. He was 45.

      Yet the story of Pancho Villa and Douglas had just begun.

      In one of Arizona's best tales of the paranormal, a tall, headless ghost roams the basement and halls of the historical Gadsden Hotel in downtown Douglas. It's said to be the ghost of Pancho Villa.

      Several sources report that someone dug up Villa's body in 1926 and chopped off his head. Where the head ended up is the subject of intense speculation. Oft-named destinations include the Skull and Bones Crypt at Yale University, a Chicago phrenology laboratory and under the foundation of the Gadsden Hotel.

      According to the Gadsden tale, Villa had a map to hidden treasure tattooed on his head. Villa loyalists took the head from his grave and buried it beneath the ashes of the Gadsden Hotel, which had recently burned down. The hotel was rebuilt in 1929, and through the years, hotel workers and guests have reported ghostly sightings of the headless spirit.

      The Gadsden, built in 1907, was designed by renowned architect Henry Trost. The magnificent lobby features a Tiffany stained-glass mural, a grand staircase of white Italian marble and four soaring marble columns. Sunshine floods the lobby through a stunning stained-glass skylight.

      One of the oldest manually operated elevators west of the Mississippi is still in use. The El Conquistador dining room is in the Gadsden, as is the Saddle & Spur Tavern, where actor Lee Marvin once got into a barroom brawl.

      The Gadsden Hotel was featured on the Travel Channel's "Hotel: Impossible" show, which offers help to struggling properties, in 2013. Since then, Peak Hospitality assumed management responsibilities and has initiated renovations and upgrades. (You can catch a rerun of the show at 10 a.m. Sept. 1.)

      Legend has it that the chip on the seventh step of the marble staircase in the lobby was made by Pancho Villa, who rode into the hotel on horseback. However, many historians - including Cindy Hayostek - doubt the bandit did any such thing.

      Hayostek and the Douglas Historical Society operate the Douglas-Williams House as a museum and time capsule of early life in town. The society is working with the Mexican Consulate in Douglas to stage events commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Agua Prieta beginning in October.

      (11) www.findagrave.com:

      Pancho Villa
      Original Name: Doroteo Arango

      Birth: Jun. 5, 1877
      Death: Jul. 20, 1923

      Mexican Revolutionary and Bandit. There is disagreement of where he is buried. He was first buried in the cemetery in Parral and grave robbers stole his head in 1926. Later the president of Mexico wanted the body moved to Mexico city, but there is a story that the mayor of Parral substituted another body that was sent to Mexico City. The story of his burial(s): For many years, after his 1923 assasination, Pancho Villa's body was buried in the Pantheon de los Dolores in Parral, Mexico. In 1972, a national monument dedicated to the heroes of the Mexican Revolution was to be built in Mexico City, and the government insisted Willa's body be brought to the monument at that time. There had been many bounties on his head, including one from Americans for his attack on Columbus, New Mexico. One local seeing a wanted poster, assumed that the reward was literally for the head of Panco Villa, dug up his body and removed the head. . . . When Don Alvarado, a local baron and friend of Pancho's heard about the robbery, he had his body moved from lot 632 to lot 10, but he had to find another body to take his place. Two years later, a woman terminally ill with cancer went to the USA for treatment, but died on the way. The men who helped move Villa's body contacted Alvarado about the possible replacement, but that it was a woman. She was chosen regardless, and her body was placed in lot 632. Many years later, when the Mexican goverment [sic] came to collect the remains, they found dress buttons, a pelvis, a femur, and a few other bones. Apparently when the chief medical examiner was handed the pelvis, he thought it was a joke, as the pelvis was obviously that of a young woman. So according to local Parral, thousands visit the Monument of the Revolution, to pay respects to an unknown woman, while Pancho rests at home. (Bio by: Steven Baldwin)

      Cause of death: Assassinated

      Burial: Parral Cemetery, Parral, Chihuahua, Mexico*
      *Alleged or in dispute

      Maintained by: Find A Grave
      Record added: Aug 14, 2000
      Find A Grave Memorial# 11736

      (12) www.findagrave.com:

      Pancho Villa

      Birth: 1877
      Death: Jul. 20, 1923

      Mexican Revolutionary, General, Bandit, and Governor. He was a major leader in the Mexican Revolution and in 1916-1917, was the object of the Punitive Expedition in which US Troops crossed into Mexico in a futile attempt to capture him. Born Jose Doroteo Orango Arámbula, he is better known under his revolutionary name, Francisco "Pancho" Villa. Many details of his life are in dispute. Villa's early life is mostly unknown. In 1894, when he was 16, he shot and killed the son of a wealthy landowner who had tried to rape his younger sister, Martina. Being pursued for murder, he escaped into the hills and initially lived as an outlaw. Between this period and the next fifteen years, his life is virtually unknown, except that he eventually became a revolutionary military leader. He first reappeared about 1910, joining the ranks of the Madero movement to overthrow Dictator Porfirio Diaz. His attack and capture of Ciudad Juarez overthrew the Diaz regime and led to Francisco Madero's presidency. In 1911, when General Pascual Orozco started a military rebellion against the new President Madero, Villa gathered a "Division of the North" to fight under General Victoriano Huerta, in support of President Madero. Huerta viewed Villa as an ambitious rival; when some of Villa's men captured a horse and Villa decided to keep it for himself, Huerta ordered Villa's execution for horse stealing and insubordination. Just before his execution, Madero commuted the sentence to life in prison, and shortly afterwards, Villa escaped from the Mexico City jail. Following the crushing of the Orozco Rebellion in 1913, General Huerta decided he wanted to become dictator of Mexico, and had President Madero assassinated, appointing himself as the new President. Politician Venustiano Carranza, citing the Mexican constitution, declared General Huerta a usurper. Gathering other politicians and generals to form a Constitutional Army of Mexico to overthrow Huerta, Carranza appointed Villa a general in the new Constitutional Army and Governor of the northern state of Chihuahua, which bordered the United States. As Chihuahua's Governor, Villa was extremely popular with the people, and he continued to support Carranza's Constitutional Army with funds and supplies purchased from the US. US President Woodrow Wilson provided support to Carranza, recognizing him as the head of the Mexican government, but it was Villa's leadership, popular appeal to the Mexicans, and his ability to recruit excellent subordinates that enabled Carranza to form a real army to oppose the Federal Army of Huerta (commonly called Federales). In June 1914, Villa attacked the strategic and heavily guarded mining city of Zacatecas, source of much of Mexico's silver; its loss caused Huerta to leave for exile in Spain in July 1914. Carranza became President of Mexico immediately, mostly due to Villa's military exploits. Initially, the successful revolutionaries fought among themselves, and Carranza's supporters battled Villa and Emiliano Zapata for power. President Wilson threw American support to Carranza, and halted supplies of weapons and money to Villa. Although he was popular among the people in the US, Villa retaliated by raiding and robbing the wealthy ranchers, including American ranchers in Mexico, and robbing trains to further his cause. When Villistas robbed a train on the Mexican North Western Railroad, coldly murdering 18 American passengers on the train, he became only a common bandit in the eyes of the Americans press. In March 1916, Villa forces raided Columbus, New Mexico, robbing its bank, and killing several American citizens. For President Wilson, this was the last straw, and he ordered General John J. Pershing to form a Punitive Expedition to pursue Villa in Mexico, to bring him to American justice. Pershing's Punitive Expedition, while unsuccessful in capturing Villa, caused great resentment among Mexicans, and was withdrawn in 1917 with the American entry into World War I. After the Punitive Expedition was withdrawn, Villa remained in hiding from Carranza, whose forces occupied the northern cities of Chihuahua during the American Intervention. In 1920, Adolfo de la Huerto became president, and Villa negotiated peace with him, retiring to a hacienda in El Canutillo. He was assassinated three years later in Parral, Chihuahua, although his assassins were never arrested; Villa had made many enemies over his lifetime, who would have motive to kill him. He is remembered today as a combination folk hero and revolutionary. The location of Villa's remains is in dispute. In 1926, grave robbers reportedly decapitated the corpse, and his skull supposedly rests in the Skull and Bones Tomb in New Haven, Connecticut. Still others maintain that his body rests in the city cemetery of Parral, Chihuahua, where it was initially laid to rest, and others maintain that it was removed to the Revolutionary Monument in Mexico City when it was built in 1972. Tombstones for Villa are in both places. (Bio by: Kit and Morgan Benson)

      Burial: Monument of the Revolution, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico[*]

      [*Alleged or in dispute]

      Maintained by: Find A Grave
      Originally Created by: Steven Baldwin
      Record added: Sep 15, 2005
      Find A Grave Memorial# 11754343
    Person ID I19189  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 

    Father Agustin de Jésus ARANGO VELA,   b. 30 Apr 1848, Cienega De Basoco, San Juan Del Río, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother María-Micaela de Jésus ARÁMBULA ALVAREZ,   b. 10 May 1851, Río Grande, San Juan del Río, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1877  San Juan del Río, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F8545  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 María-de-la-Luz CORRAL,   b. May 1892, Riva Palacio, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jul 1981, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 89 years) 
    Married 1911  San Andrós, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8547  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Juana TORRES,   d. 1916 
    Married 7 Oct 1913  Torreón, Coahuila, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8562  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Paula ALAMILLO,   b. Abt 1900 
    Married Abt 1914  Torreón, Coahuila, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8550  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Soledad SEAÑEZ HOLGUÍN,   b. Abt 1896, San Ysidro de Las Cuevas, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jul 1996, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 100 years) 
    Married 1 May 1919  Valle De Allende, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8548  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 María BARRAZA 
    Married Parral, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8551  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 María Isabel CAMPA 
    Married Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8552  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 7 Esther CARDONA 
    Married Torreón, Coahuila, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8553  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 8 Francisca CARRILLO 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8554  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 9 Manuela CASAS 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8555  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 10 Petra ESPINOZA 
    Married Santa Bárbara, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8556  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 11 Guadalupe COSS 
    Married Rancho de Santiago, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8557  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 12 María HERNÁNDEZ 
    Married 1920  Parral, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8558  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 13 Librada PEÑA 
    Married Santa Bárbara, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8559  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 14 Austreberta RENTARÍA 
    Married 22 Jun 1921  México Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8560  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 15 María REYES 
    Married Rosario, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8561  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 16 Cristina VÁZQUEZ 
    Married Santa Bárbara, Chihuahua, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8563  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 17 Asunción VILLAESCUSA 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8564  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 18 Guadalupe PERAL 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8565  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 19 María LEOCADIA 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8566  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 20 Guadalupe VALDERRAMA 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8567  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 21 María ARREOLA 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8568  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 22 Margarita NÚÑEZ 
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8569  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 23 María IZAAC 
    Married Rosario, Durango, México Find all individuals with events at this location  [23
    Last Modified 17 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F8570  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


    Headstones
    Pancho VILLA
    Pancho VILLA
    Disputed
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    Pancho VILLA
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  • Sources 
    1. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . Luz Corral de Villa. . . ." (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    2. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . a son of Juana Torres, whose mother has died in Guadalajara. . . ." (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    3. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . Paula Alamillo de Villa, who lived in Torre??n and bore him no children. . . ." (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    4. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . Soledad R. de Villa, who has one son. . . ." (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    5. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Barraza, se casaron en Parral y tuvieron un hijo llamado Miguel.

    6. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Isabel Campa, se casaron en Durango y tuvieron una hija llamada Ramoncita.

    7. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Esther Cardona, contrajo matrimonio con ella en Torre??n y tuvieron dos hijos.

    8. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Francisca Carrillo de Matamoros Coahuila.

    9. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Manuela Casas de Parral, tuvo con ella un hijo.

    10. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . another son of Petra Espinosa from Santa B(2) Katz, Friedrich, The Life and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . another son of Petra Espinosa from Santa Barbara, who is also in Canutillo. . . .".

    11. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . a son by Guadalupe Coss, who is also living in Canutillo. . . ." (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    12. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Hern??ndez, se casaron en Parral en 1920.

    13. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Librada Pe??a contrajo matrimonio en Santa B??rbara, Chihuahua y tuvieron una hija a la cual llamaron Celia Villa.

    14. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . a son by Austreberta Renter??a, who lives together with his mother in Canutillo" (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    15. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Reyes, contrajo matrimonio con el general en el Rosario, Durango y tuvieron un hijo llamado Samuel.

    16. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Cristina Vázquez, se caso con ella en Santa Bárbara Chihuahua, tuvieron un hijo.

    17. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (2) Katz, Friedrich, TheLife and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, ?? 1998 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 907, footnote 93: In July 1923, the newspaper La Patria gave the following list of Villa's wives and children: ". . . a son, Agust??n, from Asunci??n R. de Villa, who is also living in Canutillo. . . ." (La Patria, July 28, 1923).

    18. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Guadalupe Peral.

    19. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Leocadia.

    20. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Guadalupe Valderrama, tuvieron un hijo.

    21. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Arreola, tuvieron una hija.

    22. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : Margarita N????ez, tuvieron un hijo.

    23. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Las Esposas y Amantesde Pancho Villa" ("The Wives and Lovers of Pancho Villa") : María Izaac se caso con Villa en Rosario, Durango.