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101
The obituary of Evalina (GROSS) DeFRIESE appears in the May 10, 1955 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Eva Lena (I3406)
 
102
The obituary of Ida (LEGG) GROSS (Mrs. C. U. GROSS) appeared in the January 7, 1965 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
LEGG, Ida Azalea (I3414)
 
103
The obituary of James Arthur GROSS appeared in the April 27, 1963 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, James Arthur (I3407)
 
104
The obituary of Lola (GROSS) ECCLES (Mrs. Virgil ECCLES) appeared in the November 8, 1964 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Lola (I3038)
 
105
The obituary of Mrs. A. J. GROSS appeared in the August 5, 1929 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
ZIGLER, Harriet W. (I3033)
 
106
Thursday, April 20, 2000

O. Jane Barts

June 1,1917?April 17, 2000

O Jane BARTS, formerly of Waterhaven Apartments, Rochester, died at 8:15 pm. Monday at Metroplex Hospital, Killeen, Texas.

Born in Thompsonvllle, Mich. to Clarence and Edna BEEHLER MOW, she married Paul O. BARTS in 1937. He preceded her in death.

Mrs. Barts graduated from Richland Center High School and lived in Rochester most of her life.

Survivors include one son, Phillip and wife Linda BARTS, Killeen; two grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren.

No services are scheduled at this time. Internment will be in Richland Center Cemetery.

Monday, July 3, 2000

O. Jane Barts

June 1, 1917 - April 17, 2000

Othelia Jane BARTS, 82, Killeen, Texas, formerly of Rochester, died at Metroplex Hospital, Killeen.

Born in Thompsonville, Mich., to Clarence and Edna BEEHLER MOW, she married Paul O. BARTS on Feb. 27, 1937 in Logansport. He died on May 20, 1962.

Mrs. Barts retired from the Woodlawn Hospital Admissions Department in 1980. She was a member of Trinity United Methodist Church, Rochester, and belonged to the senior citizens group of Waterhaven Apartments. A graduate of Richland Center High School, she lived in Rochester for 34 years before moving to Killeen in 1996.

Survivors include one son, Philip and wife Linda BARTS, Killeen; two granddaughters, Lisa M. SNYDER and Michelle L. MANKINS, both of Killeen; two great-granddaughters, Mykel SNYDER and Chynna MANKINS, and one great-grandson, J.J. MANKINS, all of Killeen; two sisters-in-law, Mary Jo MOW, Elkhart and Mildred BARTS, Rochester.

She was preceded in death by her parants.

Graveside services are at 10 a.m. Thursday at Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery. Foster & Good Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. 
MOW, Othelia Jane (I6382)
 
107
Thursday, February 25, 1993

Roy McGriff

March 25, 1919 - Feb. 24, 1993

Roy McGRIFF, 73, of 1401 Washington St., died at 8:57 p.m. Wednesday at Naples Community Hospital, Naples, Fla., where he had been a patient since Feb. 20.

He was born near Argos to Albert and Ethel NEWCOMB McGRIFF. On Oct. 30, 1945 in Rochester he married Helen MOW, who survives. He was employed for 32?? years at GenCorp. formerly General Tire, Wabash. He was a [veteran of the Army Air Force, serving during World War II in Iceland.]

[Surviving with his wife are a grandson, Randy [McGRIFF], of Torrence, Calif.; three sisters, Leone ABBOTT, Rochester; Mrs. Charles (Mildred) GOHEEN, Argos, and Mrs. Everett (Florence) GIBBONS, Plymouth. Preceding in death was a son, John [McGRIFF]; a brother, Orville [McGRIFF], and a twin brother, Ray [McGRIFF].]

Services will be at 10 a.m. Monday a Foster & Good Funeral Home, Rochester, with the Rev. Jack HARTMAN officiating. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Sunday. Memorials may be made to Friends of the Library. 
McGRIFF, Roy (I6516)
 
108
Thursday, May 4, 1972

Eva Mow

Mrs. Eva MOW, 73, 416 West Fifth street, died unexpectedly at 2 p.m. Wednesday at her residence.

Born Dec. 29, 1898, in Kokomo, she was the daughter of John and Mary HARLAN JACKSON. Her first marriage was March 13, 1925, in Harlan, Mich., to Byron MYERS. He died in 1961. Her second marriage was July 20, 1968 in Traverse City, Mich. to C. D. MOW. He preceded in death March 11, 1972. She had resided here since 1968, moving from Traverse City, Mich. She was a member of the Argos Congregational Christian church.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Richard (Marion) MINGUS, Empire, Mich.; two sons,
Harvey MYERS, Middleton, Wis., Lawrence MYERS, Williamson, Mich.; nine grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Lena BROOKER, Kokomo, Mrs. Grace WAGNER, Harlan, Mich.; two brothers, Russell JACKSON, Frankfort, Mich., and Earl JACKSON, Pontiac, Mich.; two stepgrandchildren.

Memorial services will be conducted at 8 p.m. today in the Foster & Good funeral home. The Rev. Jacob WAECHTER will officiate. The body will be removed Friday to the King funeral home in Mesick, Mich., where friends may call after 6 p.m. Friday. Final rites will be conducted at 2 p.m. Saturday in the United Methodist church there. Burial will be in the Sherman-Mesick Memorial Park cemetery. 
JACKSON, Eva (I6496)
 
109
Thursday, November 16, 1978

James W. Cummins

Mr. James W. CUMMINS, 62, 314 Pontiac street, died at 4:49 p.m. Wednesday of an
apparent heart attack.

He was born March 10, 1916 in Hume, Ill., to William E. and Katherine McDONOUGH CUMMINS. He had lived in Rochester since 1957, moving from Fishers, Ind. He was married Dec. 24, 1965, in Rochester to Bernice WALTERS MOW, who survives. Mr. Cummins was a retired Norfolk and Western agent, and was a musician leading the Jim Cummins band. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge, Fishers; the Elks; the Manitou Moose Lodge; the Scottish Rite Lodge of South Bend and the South Bend Federation of Musicians.

Surviving with the wife are a daughter, Mrs. Norman (Shirley) DURBIN, St. Elmo, Ill.; a son, William R. CUMMINS, Kewanna; a step-son, Randy MOW, R.R. 5, Rochester; thirteen grandchildren; a sister, Marie HOOKANA, Oceanside, Cal.

Services are tentatively set for 1:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Foster & Good funeral home, with the Rev. Donald MAUGHAN officiating. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester. Friends may call from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and until time of service Saturday. 
CUMMINS, James W. (I13088)
 
110
Tuesday, August 23, 1977

Charles R. Mow

Charles Richard MOW, 57, Mishawaka, died Monday morning at his home.

Mr. Mow was born Feb. 23, 1920 to Walter and Agnes COOPER MOW at Richland Center. He married Marjorie HUNT in 1941; she survives.

Surviving with the wife are two sons, John [MOW], Sarasota, Fla., and Arthur [MOW], Mishawaka; three grandchildren; a brother, and a sister.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the Albright United Methodist church, Mishawaka. Friends may call at the Dallards funeral home, Mishawaka, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. today. 
MOW, Charles Richard (I6758)
 
111
Tuesday, February 20, 1990

Helen Irene Whitledge

Helen Irene WHITLEDGE, 87, Madisonville, Ky., died at 3:05 p.m. Sunday at the Regional Medical Center, Madisonville.

She was born on Feb. 4, 1903 in Richland Center to Charlie and Clara HARPSTER MOW. She was a retired grocery merchant.

Surviving are nieces and nephews, including Nancy GIBBONS, Rochester. Her husband, Tony WHITLEDGE, died Dec. 11, 1980.

Graveside services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Shady Grove Cemetery, Poole, Ky. There will be no visitation. Barnett-Strother Funeral Home, Madisonville, is in charge of arrangements. 
MOW, Helen Irene (I6295)
 
112
Tuesday, July 13, 1954

Samuel V. [?] Mow

Samuel V. [?] MOW, 56, former resident of Fulton county, died at 12:30 a.m. today at his residence in North Manchester. He had been in ill health for five years. He was born April 14, 1898, near Rochester to Charles and Clara (HARPSTER) MOW. He was a member of the North Manchester Presbyterian church. Mr. Mow was a retired school teacher. His wife, the former Stella WISEMAN, to whom he was married on Sept. 13, 1924, survives.

Other survivors are two daughters, Mrs. Richard REAHARD and Miss Myra Lynn MOW, both of North Manchester; one son, Thomas Allen [MOW], at home; two brothers and three sistes and two grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at the Bender funeral home, North Manchester. Dr. Orrin MANSFIELD will officiate and burial will be in the Union cemetery at Pierceton. Friends may call at the funeral home. 
MOW, Samuel Dewey (I6737)
 
113
Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Grethel Mow

Mrs. Grethel MOW, 73, R.R. 5, Rochester, died at 9 a.m. today at Woodlawn hospital where she had been a patient since Friday. She had been in declining health for 18?? years.

Mrs. Mow was born Aug. 9, 1893 in Richland township to William and Arsada BECK ROGERS. She had lived all her life in Richland township or the Argos community except for five years when she lived in Manistee county, Mich. She married C. Dean MOW, who survives, on Aug. 27, 1913. She was a member of the Congregational Christian church of Argos and a past member of the What Not club of Richland township.

In addition to her husband she is survived by two grandchildren, Mrs. James (Annette) WYSONG, Plymouth, and Leland COX, a student at Purdue university, and two sisters, Mrs. Ollie TOWNE, Rochester, and Mrs. Otis (Ethel) NELLANS, R.R. 3, Argos. A daughter, Mrs. Robert (Evelyn) COX died July 5, 1966. A son died in infancy. She was also preceded in death by three sisters.

Funeral services will be at the Congregational Christian church, Argos at 2 p.m. Thursday. The Rev. Ernest TREBER, the Rev. Jacob WAECHTER and the Rev. Russell GOOD, will officiate. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends may call at Foster & Good funeral home after 2 p.m. Wednesday up to 11 a.m. Thursday and at the church one hour before services. 
ROGERS, Grethel R. (I6670)
 
114
Was on the Hamilton County, TN School Board. Lived in Chattanooga, TN in April 1998. 
GROSS, Wylie Watson Jr. (I3456)
 
115
Wednesday, December 17, 1980

Dennis W. Mow

Dennis William MOW, 25, Rt. 2, Angola, died at his residence Friday evening of carbon monoxide poisoning. Death is attributed to be accidental.

Mr. Mow was born May 8, 1955 in Rochester to Virginia GOSS MOW, Angola, and Robert MOW, Fort Myers, Fla. He had lived most of his life in the Angola area. He was a carpenter.

Surviving with the parents are two brothers, Wayne and Kirk [MOW], both of Angola, and several aunts and uncles.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Klinks funeral Home, Angola. Graveside services will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday at the Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery with the Rev. David HEYWARD officiating. Foster & Good Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements. 
MOW, Dennis William (I6522)
 
116
Wednesday, July 6, 1966

Evelyn Cox

Mrs. Evelyn COX, 51, R.R. 1, Argos, a teacher at Riddle school, died at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in St. Joseph hospital in South Bend. Death was unexpected, although she had been ill one week.

Born in Manistee county, Mich., Aug. 23, 1915, she was the daughter of C. Dean and
Grethel ROGERS MOW, R.R. 5, Rochester, who survive. Mrs. Cox was married to Charles Robert COX, April 30, 1938 in Michigan City. She was the secretary of the Rochester Classroom Teachers association and a member of the Argos Methodist church.

Surviving with the parents and the husband are a daughter, Mrs. James (Annette) WYSONG, Plymouth and one son, Leland [COX], at home. A brother preceded in death.

Services will be in the Grossman funeral home at Argos Friday at 2 p.m. with Rev. Douglas STANWYCK officiating. Burial will be in the New Oak Hill cemetery at Plymouth. Friends may call after 10 a.m. Thursday at the funeral home. 
MOW, Evelyn Arsada (I6498)
 
117
Wednesday, October 1, 1941

Albert Leon BUNN, 63, died Tuesday afternoon at 12:15 o?clock at his home, 425 West Fourth street, this city, following an illness of several years? duration. Mr. Bunn had a host of friends throughout Fulton and Marshall counties.

The deceased, a retired Richland township farmer, was born August 27, 1878, the son of Francis Marion and Susan Catherine BABCOCK BUNN. He resided in Richland township his entire life until three years ago, when he moved to this city.

On March 21, 1903, he was united in marriage to Myrtle Mae COLE, who died June 24, 1922. His second marriage to Edna MOW, who survives, was solemnized on February 27th, 1926.

Mr. Bunn was a member of the Richland Center, Methodist church and Odd Fellows? Lodge and the Rochester Encampment.

Surviving are the widow; two daughters, Mrs. Frances HENDRICKSON, Indianapolis; Mrs. Dortha McMURRAY, Rochester; one son, Ralph [BUNN], Richland Center; three stepchildren, Herschel MOW and Mrs. Paul BARTS, both of Rochester; Charles MOW, Camp Lee, Va.; two sisters, Mrs. Perry LOWMAN, South Bend; Mrs. Clyde LOUGH, Rochester; one brother, A. E. BUNN, Leiters Ford; a half-brother, Floyd BABCOCK, Richland Center; and seven grandchildren.

Last rites will be conducted from the Richland Center Methodist church, Thursday afternoon at two o?clock. Burial is to be made in the Richland Center cemetery. The body was returned to the home this morning, where friends may call to pay their respects. 
BUNN, Albert Leon (I13062)
 
118  McCORMICK, Samuel (I392)
 
119  (FROST), Mary (I395)
 
120  BUCKMAN, Mary (I8126)
 
121  WATT, Margaret Louise (I15144)
 
122  (BERSANO), Ernesta (I16634)
 
123  CHAMBERS, James (I22307)
 
124  BRADFORD, Frances (I23508)
 
125  CHILDERS, Henry (I23509)
 
126  ARCHER, William (I44316)
 
127  BUCHANAN, John (I47485)
 
128  CLAIN, Kennard Clesson (I47538)
 
129 "First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. II, pp. 138-145 (1913):

1710. . . .
Oct. 25. . . .
Louw, Albert and wife?Louwerens. Witnesses: Michiel Van Vechten and wife.

1714. . . .
Oct. 9.
Louw, Jan and wife?Gysbert. Witnesses: Albert Louw; Mertien Beeckmas.

1716. . . .
Oct. 17. . . .
Lou, Jan and wife?Bengemin. Witnesses: Adriaen Muelenaer and wife.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. II, pp. 209-218 (1913):

1719. . . .
Apr. 4. . . .
Lou, Jan and wife, Jannitie?Marytie. Witnesses: Cornelis Lou and wife, Juedie.

1719. . . .
Oct. 13. . . .
Lou, Albert and wife?Abram; also Cornelis. Witnesses: Abram Lameter and wife; Cornelis Lou and wife.

1719. . . .
Oct. 13. . . .
Lou, Cornelis and wife?Dirck. Witnesses: Pieter and Cattalyna Middag.

1730. . . .
Oct. 25.
Louw, Cornelis and Judick?Judick. Witnesses: Dirck Middag; Maertie de Mot.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. III, pp. 56-60 (1914):

1752 [?] . . .
July 26. . . .
Loue(?), Coerneles and Catrina?Sara. Witnesses: Deneyes and Sara Vaen Dueyn.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 52-56 (1915):

1780. . . .
Dec. 10.
Low, Peter and Hanna?Cornelius.

1785. . . .
July 10.
Louw, Dirck and Dorothea Ten Eyck?Rebechka.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 145-148 (1915):

1788. . . .
June 29.
Derick Low and Doryty Tennick?Nelly.

1788. . . .
Sept. 21. . . .
Peter Low and Hanna Tenick?Andres Tenick.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 226-230 (1915):

1792. . . .
May 11.
Low, Derick and Dority Ten Eyck?Anne Van Derveer.

1792. . . .
Aug. 8.
Low, Hannah Ten Eyck (wife of Peter)?Rebechah. 
LOW, Test II (I11815)
 
130 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6828)
 
131 ((1) Elizabeth Ann Grubb:

REFERENCE:

1. Wilma MOW FOLTZ, 1049 E-450N, Rochester, IN 46975 
FECHNER, Mona Pearl (I6833)
 
132 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6875)
 
133 ((1) Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. 2 [database online], Orem, UT: Ancestry.com, 1998:

Taylor

1700, 9, 29. Thomas prcf [produced a certificate from] Chester MM [Monthly Meeting], dated 1700, 8, 28, to m [marry] Rachel Minshall

1700, 10, 27. Thomas ltm [liberated to marry] Rachel Minshall [Rachel Mincher in women's minutes] 
Family F4590
 
134 ((1) There can be no assurance that this Richard FROST was a child of John FROST and Ann HERRIT; he is shown here to stimulate further research. This Richard FROST is is listed here as a child of John FROST and Ann HERRIT because he is shown in the International Genealogical Index to have had parents named John FROST and Ann [maiden name unknown], and to have been born in Alton, Hampshire, England after January 27, 1742, when John FROST and Ann HERRIT were married to each other in Alton.

(2) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of May 3, 2007, Batch No.: J146621, Dates: 1615 - 1812, Source Call No.: 1041296, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: NONE, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

RICHARD FROAST
Male

Event(s):
Christening: OCT 1746 Alton, Hampshire, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN FROAST
Mother: ANN 
FROST, Richard (I15000)
 
135 (1)

(2) Prissilla FROST is listed in a household headed by her son, James R. STUBBLEFIELD, in the 1910 census of Dover Township, Pope County, AR. The actual enumeration date of the 1910 census was 10 May 1910.

Prissilla is listed in the 1910 census as a widow who was then 70 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1840. According to the 1910 census, she was born in TN, her father was born in AL, and her mother was born in VA. According to the 1910 census, she had theretofore given birth to 8 children, 3 of whom were then living.

(2) Arkansas Death Index, 1914-1950 [database online]: Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005

Name: Pricilla Frost
Death Day: 21
Death Month: Dec
Death Year: 1919
County: Pope
Volume Number: 61
Roll Number: 19141923
Certificate Number: 1640 
HUGHES, Priscilla (I41648)
 
136 (1)

LINDLEY, JACOB WEST, NANCY E 02/18/1851 A/ 175 BOND 
Family F6347
 
137 (1)

Monday, April 2, 1934

Mrs. Martha STAUFFER, aged 78, a resident of the Walnut neighborhood for many years, died yesterday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Tena KINDIG, 130 North Jefferson street after an illness dating from October 19, 1931 when she suffered a stroke of paralysis.

Mrs. Stauffer, whose maiden name was McGRAW, was born on a farm near Walnut. She lived in that vicinity all of her lifetime until she came to this city to make her home with her daughter.

The deceased was married twice and had two children by each marriage. In April 1875, the deceased was married to John ALDERFER who died December 4, 1879. On June 21, 1885, she was married to W. H. STAUFFER who survives. Mrs. Stauffer was a member of the Methodist Church at Walnut.

Survivors are the husband, two sons, Charles ALDERFER, Crane, Tex., and C. G. STAUFFER, of South Bend; two daughters, Mrs. Clayton FLETCHER of near Argos and Mrs. KINDIG of this city, ten grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

The funeral services will be held from the Richland Center church at 2 o?clock Wednesday afternoon with the Rev. Albert VERMILLION of Montezuma in charge. Burial will be made in the cemetery at Richland Center. 
McGRAW, Martha (I13080)
 
138 (1)

Monday, April 24, 1933

Elihu FLETCHER, aged 84, died Sunday at 7 a.m. at the home of his son Claude FLETCHER two miles southeast of Argos after a several months illness due to complications. He was born in Rush county on October 18, 1848. His parents were William and Mary FLETCHER. For 63 years or until last fall he lived on a farm near Richland Center. His wife, who was Marie REYNOLDS, preceded him in death. Rusvivors [sic] are three sons, Claude [FLETCHER], Dallas [FLETCHER] and Clayton [FLETCHER], all of whom reside on farms near Argos; a brother Martin FLETCHER of this city and a sister, Mary Ann WYNN of Detroit, Mich. The funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday from the Walnut M. P. Church with Rev. A. L. WOOTEN in charge. Burial will be made in the cemetery at Richland Center.

(2) Tombaugh, Jean C. & Wendell C., Fulton County Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions, Rochester, IN: 1993:

Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery:

FLETCHER

(1) Mariah J., 1850-1910
(2) Wm. Elihu, 1848-1933 
FLETCHER, William Elihu (I13121)
 
139 (1)

Monday, June 8, 1964

Claude D. Fletcher

Funeral services will be at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Grossman funeral home at Argos for Claude D. FLETCHER, 80, R.R. 2, Argos, who died at 12:30 p.m. Sunday in the Klapp nursing home in Argos. The Rev. Arthur A. SCHENCK will officiate and burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Born Oct. 10, 1883 in Fulton county, he was the son of William and Mariah RUNNELS FLETCHER. He was married Oct. 4, 1905 to Barbara WYNN, who died April 16, 1945. His second marriage was March 30, 1946 to Mattie REED, who survives.

Mr. Fletcher, a retired farmer, had lived in Marshall county for the past 50 years. He was a member of the Argos Methodist church and was a former trustee of Walnut township.

Surviving with the wife are two sons, Elmer and Floyd [FLETCHER], both of Argos; two step-daughters, Mrs. Francis (Margaret) LaTURNER and Mrs. Walter (Ann) HARLEY, both [of] Argos; a step-son, Richard REED, Park Ridge, Ill.; seven step-grandchildren, and three step-great-grandchildren. He was the last of eight children.

Friends may call at the funeral home.

(2) Tombaugh, Jean C. & Wendell C., Fulton County Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions, Rochester, IN: 1993:

Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery:

FLETCHER

(1) Barbara E., 1882-1945
(2) Claud D., 1883-1964 
FLETCHER, Claude D. (I13124)
 
140 (1)

Name: HOLZEMER, KATHERINE
Social Security #: 0
Sex: FEMALE
Birth Date: 11 Dec 1884
Birthplace: ILLINOIS
Death Date: 11 Jul 1954
Death Place: LOS ANGELES
Mother's Maiden Name: POWERS
Father's Surname: SHANNON 
SHANNON, Katherine (I7790)
 
141 (1)

Saturday, September 27, 1958

Dallas Fletcher

Dallas W. FLETCHER, 84, died at 7 p.m. Friday at Argos after a year?s illness. He had resided with his daughters since the death of his wife two years ago.

Born Jan. 12, 1874, in Walnut township, Marshall county, he was the son of William and Maria RUNNELLS FLETCHER. He was married Nov. 10, 1895, to Ina May COPLEN, who died Jan. 1, 1956.

A retired farmer, Mr. Fletcher had lived several years in Fulton county. He was the oldest member of the Walnut Gospel church at the time of his death.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Leo (Gertrude) ALDERFER, R.R. 1, Argos, and Mrs.Onan (Opal) LAUGHMAN, R.R. 4, Columbia City; six grandchildren; eleven great-grandchildren; one brother, Claude [FLETCHER], R.R. 1, Argos. One son, Lloyd [FLETCHER], died in 1937.

Funeral services will be Monday at 2 p.m. DST at the Walnut Gospel church with the Rev. Roman MILLER, assisted by Wayne SPEICHER, officiating. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends may call after 7 p.m. today until 10 a.m. Sunday at the Grossman funeral home in Argos. The body will be removed to the home of Mrs. Leo ALDERFER and then taken to the church an hour before the services.

(2) Tombaugh, Jean C. & Wendell C., Fulton County Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions, Rochester, IN: 1993:

Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery:

FLETCHER

(1) Iva Mae, 1879-1956
(2) Dallas W., 1874-1958 
FLETCHER, Dallas W. (I13123)
 
142 (1)

Thursday, October 9, 1952

Henry Stauffer

Final rites for Henry STAUFFER, 95, who passed away Wednesday morning at the home of his son Neal STAUFFER of South Bend, will be held 2 p.m. Friday at the Richland Center church. Burial will be in an adjacent cemetery.

Mr. Stauffer was a former resident of Walnut, where he was engaged in the carpet and
rug weaving business for many years.

Besides the son, he is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Tenia KINDIG, New Carlisle, nine
grandchildren, twenty-one great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. 
STAUFFER, W. Henry (I13119)
 
143 (1)

Wednesday, September 11, 1940

Funeral services were held in Keokuk, Iowa, Sunday for Charles L. ALDERFER, aged 65, who died at his home in Keokuk last Thursday from a sudden heart attack. He had been in failing health for two years.

Mr. Alderfer was born at Walnut July 30, 1875, and for a number of years lived in the Walnut and Tiosa neighborhoods. For many years he traveled with the Hagenbeck-Wallace circus as a trapeze artist and then had his own wagon circus which was billed under the title of ?ALDERFER?S GREAT DOG AND PONY SHOW.?

Mr. Alderfer was married in 1892 to Miss Emma KEISTER. He was a member of the M[e]thodist church and Masonic fraternity at Gilead. Mr. Alderfer maintained winter quarters for his circus in Gilead for five years.

Surviving are his widow; a son, Leroy ALDERFER, of Crane, Texas; a daughter, Mrs. Ralph CHRISTY, of Keokuk; two grandchildren; a brother, C. O. STAUFFER, of South Bend; two sisters, Mrs. Clayton FLETCHER of Argos and Mrs. Tenia KINDIG of Mishawaka and stepfather, W. H. STAUFFER of South Bend. 
ALDERFER, Charles L. (I13120)
 
144 (1) "Readington Church Baptisms from 1720," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 298-308 (1915):

1752. . . .
May 13.
Lou, Cornelius and Johanna Jansen Jan.
Witness: Jannetje Lou.

(2) Riker, James, Revised History of Harlem (City of New York), New York, NY: New Harlem Publishing Co., 1904, pp. 583, 586:

CORNELIUS (19), (SON OF JAN) (JOHN), HAD ISSUE:

61. Jan (John), baptized May 13, 1752, married Aeltie _____, had two children. . . .

JAN (JOHN) (61), (SON OF CORNELIUS), HAD ISSUE:

114. Cathlintie, baptized December 4, 1774.

115. Bengemen (Benjamin) , baptized August 28, 1780, married Annie Trimmer, January 14, 1802. 
LOW, John (I11486)
 
145 (1) A household headed by Moses LYNCH is listed in the 1860 census of Lone Oak Township, Bates County, MO.

Moses is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer who was then 25 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1835. According to the 1860 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Judah, who was then 23 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1860 census, she was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Sarah, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1858. According to the 1860 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is Henry FROST, who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1860 census, she was born in IA. The relationship between Moses LYNCH and Henry FROST is not listed in the 1860 census.

(2) A household headed by Moses LINCH is listed in the 1870 census of Independence Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses is listed in the 1870 census as a farmer who was then 36 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1834. According to the 1870 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Juda, who was then 33 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1870 census, she was born in WV.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Sarah E., who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1859. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Grace A., who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1862. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Olive E., who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1867. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Laura D.,, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1868. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

(3) A household headed by Moses LYNCH is listed in the 1880 census of Independence Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses is listed in the 1880 census as farmer who was then 45 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1835. According to the 1880 census, he was born in IN, and both of his parents were born in VA.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Julia, who was then 43 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1880 census, she was born in IN, and both of her parents were born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, S. Ella, who was then 21 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1859. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in IN, and her mother was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Grace A., who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1862. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in IN, and her mother was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Ollie, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1867. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in IN, and her mother was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his son, Elmer, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1867. According to the 1880 census, he was born in IA, his father was born in IN, and his mother was born in VA.

(4) A household headed by Moses LINCH is listed in the 1900 census of Independence Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses Linch is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer who was born in March 1835 and was then 65 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in KY, his father was born in VA, and his mother was born in MD. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married 42 years.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Judith, who was born in September 1837 and was then 62 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in VA, and both of her parents were born in VA. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married 42 years and had theretofore given birth to 9 children, 3 of whom were then living.

Also listed with Moses is his son, Elmer E., a farm laborer who was born in July 1870 and was then 29 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in IA, his father was born in KY, and his mother was born in VA. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married less than 1 year.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter-in-law, Elma, who was born in June 1883 and was then 17 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in MO, and both of her parents were born in MO. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married less than 1 year and had theretofore given birth to no children.

Also listed with Moses is Brandon HARVEY, a farm laborer who was born in June 1877 and was then 22 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in MO, and both of his parents were born in MO.

(5) Virginia Smith has provided to the compiler a copy of a warranty deed dated May 2, 1900 from Moses LINCH and Juda LINCH, husband and wife, to John L. SCIFERS, covering a 10-acre tract of land in Appanoose County, IA. The tract of land, which is located in Section 26, Township 70 North, Range 19 West, was conveyed for the consideration of $275. 
LINCH, Moses (I960)
 
146 (1) Andrew STARNES/STARNS is listed in a household headed by his father, Henry STARNS, in the 1880 census of the 1st Civil District of Meigs County, TN. [The compiler believes that Henry STARNS was James Henry STARNES, Sr.]

According to the 1880 census, Andrew was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1873. [The compiler believes that Andrew was Colonel Andrew STARNES/STARNS.] According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN.

(2) Colonel A. STARNES is listed in a household headed by his brother, James H. STARNES, in the 1900 census of the 3rd Civil District of James [now Hamilton] County, TN. [The compiler believes that James H. STARNES was James Henry STARNES, Jr.]

According to the 1900 census, Colonel A. was a salesman who was born in September 1874 and who was then 25 years of age. [The compiler believes that Colonel A. was Colonel Andrew STARNES/STARNS.] According to the 1900 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were born in TN. Also, according to the 1900 census, he had then been married 3 years.

(3) Callahan, Clyde C. & Jones, Byron B., Pioneering in Kiowa County, Hobart, OK: Kiowa County Historical Society, 1976-1982, v. 4, p. 176:

Hobart, though less than five years old, has made wonderful progress in all lines of enterprise and in no line is it more apparent than the retail grocery.

One of our worthy firms in this line is Starns Brothers, located at the corner of Main and Sixth streets, where they occupy their own building, a two-story building 25 X 60 feet in dimensions. This firm was established August 10, 1903, and from what might be termed a "handful" of groceries have grown until they now carry a large and complete stock of staple and fancy groceries, produce, vegetables and fruits of all kinds in season. They have also just built a large brick cold storage cellar for the storage of fruits and vegetables. This firm has no specialty except high grade goods at lowest prices.

They enjoy a large trade, requiring the services of two employees and two delivery wagons in the transaction of their business.

The firm composes of C. A. and Stanton Starns. They are natives of Tennessee and have lived in Hobart since the opening of this country. They are recognized as among our prominent and progressive business men.

(4) A household headed by Colonel STARNES is listed in the 1910 census of Hobart, Kiowa County, OK at 230 Lowe Street.

Colonel is listed in the 1910 census as a merchant who worked in a grocery, and who was then 36 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1874. According to the 1910 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were born in TN. Also, according to the 1910 census, he had then been married 12 years. [The compiler believes that Colonel was Colonel Andrew STARNS.]

Listed with Colonel is his wife, Ida A., who was then 29 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1881. According to the 1910 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN. Also, according to the 1910 census, she had been married 12 years and had given birth to 6 children, 4 of whom were then living. [The compiler believes that Ida was Ida L. STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel is his daughter, Reno, who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1902. According to the 1910 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Reno was Rene STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel is his son, Melvin, who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1904. According to the 1910 census, he was born in OK, and both of his parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Melvin was Colonel Melvin STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel is his daughter, Wilma, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1908. According to the 1910 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Wilma was Wilma Juanita STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel is his daughter, Morene, who was then 2 months of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1910. According to the 1910 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Morene was Ida Maurine STARNS.]

Also listed at the same address is a household headed by Mode A. GROSS. [Note by compiler: Mode A. GROSS was a first cousin of Ida A. STARNS.]

Mode A. is listed in the 1910 census as a salesman who worked in a grocery, and who was then 27 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1883. According to the 1910 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were also born in TN.

Listed with Mode A. is his wife, Ola S. GROSS, who was then 18 years old; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1892. According to the 1910 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were also born in TN.

(5) World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-18 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2002:

Name: Colonel Andy Starns
City: Hobart
County: Kiowa
State: Oklahoma
Birth Date: 11 Sep 1873
Race: White
Roll: 1851786
Draft Board: 0
Age: 45
Occupation: Hotel; self-employed
Nearest Relative: Ida Starns of Hobart, OK
Registration Place: Hobart, OK
Height: Medium
Build: Medium
Color of Eyes: Blue
Color of Hair: Brown
Signature: Colonel Andy Starns

(6) A household headed by Colonel O. STARNES is listed in the 1920 census of Hobart, Kiowa County, OK at 401 South Jefferson Street.

Colonel O. is listed in the 1920 census as a hotel manager who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1874. According to the 1920 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Colonel O. was Colonel Andrew STARNS.]

Listed with Colonel O. is his wife, Ida, who was then 34 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1886. According to the 1920 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Ida was Ida L. STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his daughter, Reno, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1903. According to the 1920 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Reno was Rene STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his son, Melvin, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1905. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OK, and both of his parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Melvin STARNES was Colonel Melvin STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his daughter, Wilma, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1908. According to the 1920 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Wilma was Wilma Juanita STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his daughter, Maurine, who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1911. According to the 1920 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Maurine was Ida Maurine STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his son, Byron, who was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1913. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OK, and both of his parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Byron was Byron Eugene STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his daughter, Lucille, who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1915. According to the 1920 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Lucille was Jennie Lucile STARNS.]

Also listed with Colonel O. is his daughter, Jennette, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1918. According to the 1920 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN. [The compiler believes that Jennette was Evelyn Jeanette STARNS.]

(7) Advertisement clipped from unknown newspaper [probably a Hobart, OK newspaper], sometime in or after 1951:

"Your Home Away From Home" Since 1913

Starns Hotel of 1913 Becomes Hobohola (Hovaka) Hotel of 1951

Col. Starns Builds Hotel Building -

Col. C. A. Starns is the founder of the present Hovaka Hotel. Col. Starns constructed the first unit of the building in 1911. The ground floor housed the Starns Grocery and Meat Market. The second floor, which included the present second and third floors, was leased to the Hobart Elks Club. In 1916 the Colonel constructed a 25-foot annex on the west side of the original building and used it as a hotel.

Burke and Hoover Purchase Hotel -

Jene Burke and his partner H. H. Hoover purchased the Starns property in 1917 and in 1918 remodeled the building. The 20-foot ceiling of the second floor was lowered[,] converted [sic, should be converting] the structure to a four story hotel building. Hoover purchased Burke's interest a few months later. He was sole owner until his death [illegible]. His son, Herbert C. Hoover and a daughter, [illegible] L. Hoover are present owners.

Hovaka, Short for Hobohola -

Hovaka is an Indian name originally spelled Hobohola. Harry Wagoner, Hobart, who was a partner of Burk [sic] and Hoover in an oil company suggested the name Hovaka for the Hotel. Harry recalls the company's first well was drilled on property belonging to Mrs. Singing Woman, wife of Hovaka.

Hobart's Hovaka Hotel Today -

Today the Hovaka is a modern hotel with 87 guest rooms. "Hank" Johnson has been manager of the hotel since 1947.

The Hovaka is headquarters for oil men and cotton buyers in this area. It houses the Western Union office and the Hobart Charmber of Commerce office.

The management plans to reopen the hotel coffee shop and banquet room in the near future.

HOVAKA HOTEL

"Hank" Johnson, Manager

(8) A household headed by Colonel A. STARNES is listed in the 1930 census of Ward 2, Block 900, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK at 919 Northeast Eighth Street.

Colonel A. is listed in the 1930 census as a building contractor who was then 57 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1873. According to the 1930 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were born in TN.

Listed with Colonel A. is his wife, Ida, who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1884. According to the 1930 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN.

Also listed with Colonel A. is his son, Melvin, a carpenter who was then 24 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1906. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OK, and both of his parents were born in TN.

Also listed with Colonel A. is his son, Byron, a parking yard attendant who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1912. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OK, and both of his parents were born in TN.

Also listed with Colonel A. is his daughter, Lucile, who was then 16 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1914. According to the 1930 census, she was born in OK.

Also listed with Colonel A. is his daughter, Jennette, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1918. According to the 1930 census, she was born in OK, and both of her parents were born in TN.

(9) The Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, OK, October 18, 1936, p. 13:

. . . E. H. Neff, 69-year-old city salesman, . . . 413 West California avenue, died Saturday [October 17, 1936] morning in Wesley hospital of injuries received Friday [October 16, 1936] night when he was struck by a car driven by C. A. Starnes, 1505 South Agnew avenue, in the 400 block West California avenue. . . .

Services for Neff will be conducted at 10 a.m. Monday [October 19, 1936] by Rev. S. M. Green from the Watts and McAtee funeral home. Burial will be in Rose Hill Cemetery.

(10) A household headed by C. A. STRNO is listed in the 1940 census of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK. [The compiler believes that C. A.'s surname was really STARNS.] The official enumeration date of this household is April 1, 1940; the actual enumeration date of this household is April 20, 1940.

C. A.'s household is listed on Micklandlee [?] Street. [Note by compiler: As far as the compiler knows, there was no street named Micklandlee in Oklahoma City in 1940. The street may have been McKinley.]

C. A. is listed in the 1940 census as a carpenter who was then 67 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1873. According to the 1940 census, he was born in TN. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was at the same place as it was as of April 1, 1940.

Listed with C. A. is his wife, Norma, who was then 47 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1940 census, she was born in TX. According to the 1940 census, her residence as of April 1, 1935 was at the same place as it was as of April 1, 1940.

Also listed with C. A. is his step-daughter, Norma, who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, she was born in about 1935. According to the 1940 census, she was born in OK. According to the 1940 census, her residence as of April 1, 1935 was at the same place as it was as of April 1, 1940.

(11) The Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, OK, January 20, 1941, p. 12:

COLONEL ANDREW STARNS

Colonel Andrew Starns, a resident of Oklahoma about 43 years, died at St. Anthony hospital Sunday [January 19, 1941] after a two-week illness of a heart ailment. He lived at 916?? Northwest Sixth Street.

Starns, 68 years old, was born in Tennessee, where he lived until he was 25 years old. He moved to Hobart, and at one time owned a grocery, meat market and hotel there. He moved to Oklahoma City in 1923. For the last five years he had been employed as a building contractor.

Survivors include his wife, Norma Jean; five daughters, Mrs. R. A. Robinson [sic], Wichita, Kan.; Mrs. H. M. Lewis, Durant; Mrs. Maurine Cunningham, Norman; Mrs. B. [sic] L. Frost, Tulsa; and Mrs. J. T. Rutherford jr., Houston, Texas; and two sons, Melvin and Byron Starns, both of Norman.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday [January 21, 1941] at Guardian funeral home, with burial in Memorial Park cemetery.

(12) [Note: The following information has been reformatted by the compiler for the purpose of clarity]

STANDARD CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
State of Oklahoma

State File No. _____
Registrar's No. 58635

1. PLACE OF DEATH:
(a) County: Oklahoma
(b) City or town: Oklahoma City
(c) Name of hospital or institution: St. Anthony Hospital
(d) Length of stay:
In hospital or institution: _____
In this community: _____

2. USUSAL RESIDENCE OF DECEASED:
(a) State: Oklahoma
(b) County: Oklahoma
(c) City or town: Oklahoma City
(d) Street No.: 3800 Meridian [Note by compiler: the death certificate does not specify whether the address on Meridian was N.W. or S.W.]
(e) If foreign born, how long in U.S.A.: _____ years

3(a) FULL NAME: Colonel Andrews Starnes [sic]
3(b) If veteran, name war: No
3(c) Social Security No.: None

4. Sex: Male

5. Color or race: W

6(a) Single, widowed, married, divorced: Married
6(b) Name of husband or wife: Norman, Jean Starnes [sic]
6(c) Age of husband or wife if alive: _____ years

7. Birth date of deceased: September 11, 1872

8. AGE: 68 Years, 4 Months, 7 Days; If less than one day: _____ hr. _____ min.

9. Birthplace: Birchwood Tenn.

10. Usual occupation: Contractor

11. Industry or business: _____

12. Name of father: Unknown

13. Birthplace of father: Unknown

14. Maiden name of mother: Unknown

15. Birthplace of mother: Unknown

16(a) Informant's own signature: Mrs. Norma Starnes [sic]
16(b) Address: 3800 Meridian, Okla. City [Note by compiler: the death certificate does not specify whether the address on Meridian was N.W. or S.W.]

17(a) Burial, cremation, or removal: Burial
17(b) Date thereof: 1-21-41
17(c) Place: burial or cremation: Memorial Park

18(a) Signature of funeral director: Guardian Funeral Home
18(b) Address: Oklahoma City, Okla.

19(a) Date received local registrar: 1-20-41
19(b) Registrar's signature: /s/ Lee Meuten[?]

MEDICAL CERTIFICATION

20. Date of death: Month: January; day: 18; year: 1941; hour: 11 PM; minute: _____

21. I hereby certify that I attended the deceased from Jan. 12 1941 to Jan. 18, 1941: that I last saw him alive on Jan 18 1941; and that death occurred on the date and hour stated above. Immediate cause of death: Coronary embolism; Duration: 1 day; Due to Chronic caridovascular-venal disease; Duration: 1 year +; Due to Unknown; Other conditions: none

22. If death was due to external causes, fill in the following:
(a) Accident, suicide, or homicide (specify): _____
(b) Date of occurrence: _____
(c) Where did injury occur?: _____
(d) Did injury occur in or about home, on farm, in industrial place, in public place?: _____ While at work?: _____
(e) Means of injury: _____

23. Signature: /s/ John A. Roddy M.D.
Address: 811 Ramsey Tower, Oklahoma City
Date signed: Jan. 20/ 41 
STARNS, Colonel Andrew (I74)
 
147 (1) Byron STARNES is listed in a household headed by his father, Colonel O. STARNES, in the 1920 census of Hobart, Kiowa County, OK at 401 South Jefferson Street. [The compiler believes that Colonel O. STARNES was Colonel Andrew STARNS.]

According to the 1920 census, Byron was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1913. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OK. [The compiler believes that Byron was Byron Eugene STARNS.]

(2) Following are copies of newspaper articles regarding athletic activities of Byron STARNS. The names of the newspapers in which the articles appeared, and the dates of the articles, are unknown. However, most of the articles probably appeared in an Oklahoma City, OK newspaper.

Starnes [sic]!

Little Substitute Forward Saves Central's Bacon.

JOHNNY SOERGEL, Central high's scoring ace, is in bed with the flu and the Cards missed him Thursday night.

It was due to the excellent basket shooting of Starnes [sic], a midget substitute forward, who filled Soergel's place, that the Oklahoma City five was able to get into the second round. Starnes hit three buckets in the final minute of play.

* * *

Hair Mussed - Starnes [sic] Scores

Byron Starns got his hair mussed up!

It happened in the Elmore City-Central game during the state tournament, when a lanky forward on the rival team stepped in Byron's face.

That proved a strain on the little Card's good nature. Byron, with his slick hair disheveled, went wild; hitting baskets coming and going. He scored half of Central's points. The team was praying for the same incident to happen in the Tulsa tilt, but someone must have given the oilers a tip, and, except when one Brave tried to push out Starns' front teeth, he was left strictly alone.

"In each of our forthcoming games may our 'patent leather kid's' hair be mussed up," is the Cardinal team's latest petition to the luck god of athletics.

* * *

City Athletes to California

Bus Boggs and Byron Starnes [sic] Attend Western School

Bus Boggs and Byron Starnes [sic], two of Central High School's star athletes, will leave early Thursday to enter the University of California.

Boggs has been a star on the Cardinal football team for three years. He is an elusive, speedy backfield man. Starnes [sic] was a member of the Central basketball squad which attended the national tournament week before last.

Both are promising prospects in their respective sport.

* * *

ON SHORT END AFTER PLAYOFF

Mortensen's Crew Leads California Through First Half

By BOB PATTON

A junior college basketball team with its nose pointed toward big things began a voyage that will take it through a series of, hard games by holding the fast University of California 145-pound team to a 23-23 tie. Jaysee lost the five-minute playoff, the final reckoning being 29-25.

Riverside looked good all the way through, playing fast and hard. A few times the boys missed setups that should have been sure points but Califorina did the same thing to even it up. The "Cal" visitors have profited from a barnstorming tour that has kept' them in good shape and developed their teamwork, while for, the Junior college, this was practically the first game that has amounted to anything. Yes, they look good.

Coach Mortensen used Keich and Starns as forwards through a good share of the game, slipping in "Pop" Meyerson and Krinard a couple of times. Both combinations worked well. The only other Riverside substitution was Needham for Shockley at center near the end of the game. Add Arbelbide and South as guards and you have the lineup.

Good Shot

Starns, the newcomer to the squad from Oklahoma, made good, doing some of the prettiest shooting since Hess Pierce used to drop them in from freakish angles. Starns has a high arching shot that he can use from quite a distance from the basket--a good trait to have handy in. the last few minutes. Starns needs a little more practice to get in shape but after that, he will be a "find."

The half ended with the score 15-11 in favor of Riverside, the Tigers having a decided edge in the second quarter, holding "Cal" scoreless for that short period.

The crowd got a great kick out of the game and those who went will go to see the Junior college play again. South and Arbelbide, who made such a hit on the football field through their fine playing, show possibilities of winning more glory on the basketball field. They played well last night.

The California team defeated Santa Ana Junior college 34-19 last night, so things are looking up for Riverside.

* * *

O.U. Has Two Shots at Fourball Tourney

Accent Still Is on Youth

By STAN PATE

Oklahoma City's spring-long golfing derby - the sixth annual fourball tournament - goes to the post in the quarterfinal round Sunday at the Oklahoma City Golf and Country club, and a couple of youthful combines which have served as front runners in the four previous rounds will settle part of the stretch drive in a hurry.

The feature attraction on the card of four topnotch matches will send the two youngest outfits in the field against each other when Deen Wood and Jimmy Samis tangle with Bo Wininger and Byron Starns.

Championship matches will parade to the barrier starting at 2 p.m., with consolation matches scheduled to hear the starter's bugle at 3 p.m.

Strong Every Week

Ever since the tournament opened Wood and Samis, a pair of Classen highschool youths whose combined age is only 34 years, have played spectacularly ripping par to shreds on public courses. The move to their home layout should make them even more formidable.

Wood has been clocked in 67 over the par 71 layout, and last summer led state qualifying for the national amateur tournament.

Wininger and Starns hail from Norman, the former a student at the University of Oklahoma, and the latter a book store executive and one-time Central highschool basketball star.

Wininger, whose home is Guthrie, was a highschool hotshot two years ago and some railbirds consider him as fine an individual golfer as the field boasts. . . .

[Note by compiler: Francis "Bo" Wininger later became a professional golfer.]

(3) U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database online], Provo, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2005:

Name: Byron E Starns
Birth Year: 1912
Race: White, citizen
Nativity State or Country: Oklahoma
State: Oklahoma
County or City: Cleveland
Enlistment Date: 11 Jun 1942
Enlistment State: Oklahoma
Enlistment City: Oklahoma City
Branch: Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code: Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA
Grade: Private
Grade Code: Private
Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source: Civil Life
Education: 3 years of high school
Civil Occupation: Bandsman, Oboe or Parts Clerk, Automobile
Marital Status: Married
Height: 70
Weight: 207

(4) Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004:

Name: Byron E Starns
Death Date: Oct 1956
County of Death: Alachua
State of Death: Florida
Race: White
Gender: Male

(5) Social Security Death Index:

Name: Byron Starns
SSN: 447-03-2736
Born: 20 Jan 1912
Died: Oct 1956
State (Year) SSN issued: Oklahoma (Before 1951) 
STARNS, Byron Eugene Sr. (I2729)
 
148 (1) Clemis? MERCHAT is listed with a household headed by her father, William MERCHAT, in the 1860 census of the 3rd Ward of Toledo, Lucas County, OH.

According to the 1860 census, Clemis? was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1857. According to the 1860 census, she was born in OH. [The compiler believes that Clemis? was Clara Elizabeth MARCHANT.]

(2) The compiler could not find Clara MARCHANT in the index to the 1870 census of Lucas County, OH.

(3) Trinity Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials; Also Confirmations & Communicants (1858-1874):

Clara MARCHANT was "b" [baptized].

(4) Trinity Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials; Also Confirmations & Communicants (1874-1891):

Clara Elizabeth MARCHANT was confirmed on 05/10/1874 at age 17; her confirmation was no. 213 in this church.

(5) Clara E. TIBBETTS is listed with a household headed by her husband, Thompson TIBBETTS, in the 1800 census of Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, IA.

According to the 1880 census, Clara E. was then 22 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1858. According to the 1880 census, she was born in OH, and both of her parents were born in England.

(6) Clara E. TIBBETTS is listed with a household headed by her husband, Thomas TIBBETTS, in the 1900 census of Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, IA. [The compiler believes that Thomas TIBBETTS was Thompson TIBBETTS.]

According to the 1900 census, Clara E. was born in August 1957 and was then 42 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in OH, and both of her parents were born in England. According to the 1920 census, she had then been married 20 years, and had given birth to 8 children, 6 of whom were then living.

(7) Obituary from Hedrick [IA] Journal, July 15, 1931:

Mrs. T. F. Tibbetts passed away Saturday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otis Hawk, after a short illness. The deceased was an estimable woman, a good neighbor and a wonderful mother. She had lost her husband less than a year ago. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Spyker in the Presbyterian church yesterday at 10 a.m. with singing by the McCreery trio, of Pekin. Interment was made in Mt. Zion Cemetery. The family has the sympathy of the entire community.

(8) Obituary from Hedrick [IA] Journal, July 15, 1931:

Clara E. Tibbetts, was born in Toledo, Ohio, August 23, 1857, and departed this life July 11, 1931 at the age of 73 years, ten months and 19 days. The deceased came to Des Moines county, Iowa, with her parents when 17 years of age, residing on a farm near Pleasant Grove. She was married to T. F. Tibbetts March 11, 1980. She, with her husband, united with the Presbyterian church, later moving their membership to Martinsburg, where she was a faithful member until the end.

Eight children came to bless this home?Mrs. D. O. Hawk and W. G. Tibbetts, of Martinsburg; O. C. Tibbetts of Burlington; and Mrs. Ben Porter, of Hedrick, surviving, and four preceding her in death. She had made her home with her eldest daughter, Mrs. D. O. Hawk, since the death of her husband on August 27, 1930. Besides the members of her family, she leaves 9 grandchildren, 2 great grandchildren, two sisters and a brother, besides a host of other relatives and friends.

(9) Obituary from unknown newspaper, unknown date in July 1931:

Mrs. Clara Tibbetts, 73 years old died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. O. Hawk Saturday at 4:00 P.M., July 11th, after a weeks illness. Her husband preceded her in death a year ago this August. She leaves the following children, Mrs. D. O. Hawk and William Tibbetts, of Martinsburg, Mrs. Nellie Porter of Hedrick, O. C. Tibbetts of Burlington. The funeral was held at 10 o'clock Monday morning at the Presbyterian church in Martinsburg conducted by the Rev. John Spyker the local minister and burial at Mount Zion cemetery.

(10) Obituary from the Ottumwa [IA] Courier, July 15, 1931:

Hedrick, July 13 - Mrs. Clara Tibbetts, 73 years old, died at 4 p.m. Saturday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. O. Hawk, at Martinsburg, after she had been ill one week.

She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Hawk and Mrs. Nellie Porter of Hedrick, and by two sons, William Tibbetts of Martinsburg and O. C. Tibbetts of Burlington. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. today at the Presbyterian church in Martinsburg in charge of the Rev. John Spyker and burial was in Mt. Zion cemetery.

(11) Article from the Hedrick [IA] Journal, July 1931:

FUNERAL MONDAY

Martinsburg, July 16 - Funeral services for Mrs. T. F. Tibbetts were held at the Presbyterian church Monday morning. Mrs. Tibbetts died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Otis Hawk, where she has made her home since the death of her husband in August, 1930. She is survived by four children, Mrs. Otis Hawk and W. G. Tibbetts of Martinsburg, Mrs. Nellie Porter of Hedrick, and Ollie Tibbetts of Burlington. Rev. J. A. Spiker, Presbyterian pastor, had charge of the services, and interment was made in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

(12) http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Fields/6746/mtzioncem.html:

MT. ZION CEMETERY

TIBBETTS, CLARA E.; (mother); 1857 - 1931 
MARCHANT, Clara Elizabeth (I787)
 
149 (1) Crow Family

Esther was born in 1785 in Wheeling Creek, Greene County, Pennsylvania, in the extreme southwest corner of the state. She was the daughter of Jacob and Susan Secris(t) Crow. Jacob Crow (Gro) was born in Germany or Holland about 1732 and left Germany as a young man leaving his mother and two sisters who were all the family, behind. After arriving in Philadelphia about 1750 without any money, he was sold for a sufficient time to pay for his passage. After his time was finished, he married Susannah Seacress (Secrist) about 1860.

Susannah Secrist was born about 1735, and was also an indentured servant. The family name Siegrist occurs in variant spellings in the German language, as follows: Siecrist, Siegrist Siegerist, Sigeris, Sigeris, Siegeriss, Sigerist, Sigriz. The German word Sigrist is a provincial term and it is still current in the South or Southwest of Germany, in the Alemannic linguistic area. This is the area from which came most of the ancestors of the present day Pennsylvania Germans (sometimes erroneously called Pennsylvania Dutch).

After they were married, Jacob and Susannah Crow purchased a 362 acre farm near the Great Crossings on Youghiogeny River, in West Moreland County, in the southwest corner of Pennsylvania. The farm was located in a mountainous area, and is now mostly under water as a dam was later built for flood protection. A blockhouse was built on their property for protection from Indians. Here the family resided for many years, until some of the children were in their teens. There they raised eleven children, five sons and six daughters: Frederick, Martin, Peter, John, Michael, Susan, Elizabeth, Tena, Catherine, Esther and Mary. The family then began looking for a home further west. In 1769, they traded a team of oxen and wagon for a tract of land of about 450 acres, situated on the south branch of Wheeling creek, later to be known as Crow Creek or Crow Mills, in Greene County, Pennsylvania. It is located in the extreme southwest corner of Pennsylvania, about one-half mile from the border with West Virginia. Their new home was a log cabin. Near the home site were two mounds and an earthen circle, built supposedly by the Indians. Jacob Crow served as a private in the Virginia Militia during the Revolutionary War, serving in the Company of Capt. Daniel Smith (1776).

Jacob and Susannah moved to their new home in the wilderness when Michael was but a few weeks old. The first night in their cabin was not one of peaceful slumber. Roving bands of Indians were on all sides. Fearing an attack by the savages, the family fled into the woods. The mother had the small baby, Michael, and became separateds from the rest of the family. Fearing to call out, and also that the child might cry, she walked nearly all night, not knowing where, but was pleased, when daylight came, to find herself in sight of home.

When Michael was seven years old there was an alarm circulated that Indians were around, and all fled to the block house at Lindley's, Washington county, Penn. Two men living alone on what is now known as the Harsh farm, not getting word soon enough, were killed. After all were at the fort, a number of men departed to see about the men they feared had been killed. John Crow was one of the number, and for some reason brought Michael with them to the Farley farm, now owned by Thomas Steele. There they left him, John promising to come back that night. Fearing to stay at the house, he crossed the creek and stayed under a cliff of rocks. At evening he came to the house and got something to eat. Fearing both Indians and wolves, he raised a "puncheon" in the floor and arranged so that if Indians came he could crawl down and out under the house. If wolves came, he could go in the house and shut the hole. He was left there till the evening of the third day, when the men came back. The men at Harsh place were found dead and were buried. The head of one was gone, and was afterward found by some of Jacob Crow's sons while hauling wood. After the block house was built at the Crow farm, word was given that the Indians were about. When they gathered at the fort in the evening, it turned out that Whartons, who lived where Majorsville now is, had not been apprised of the danger, and no one seemed willing to go. Michael, then perhaps fifteen years old, said he would go. After the warning had been given he was returning across the hill, following a footpath through the woods, something attracted his attention. The moon was just rising, he stooped for a better view, and saw Indians crouched in the path. He turned quickly aside and jumped behind a tree. A large dog come after him and he ran to another tree, at the same time striking at the dog to keep him off. He then took a more circuitous route and got home in safety. The following morning, two boys went to catch horses which were running in the woods. The Indians captured them, and took them nearly to Moundsville and tied to a tree. The Indians went elsewhere, and while left alone, the the boys made their escape.

The family soon planted apple seeds and sprouts brought with them over the mountains in pack saddles. While the settlers were tending their crops, they kept part of the men out as lookouts to watch for the Indians. They opened sugar camps, cleared ground for corn, built corrals for their sheep, erected a blockhouse or fort near the cabin, and hunted for game. The latter included bear, deer, wildcats, panthers, wolves, otters, wild hogs, ducks, and turkeys. German was spoken by the family, and the children learned to speak English in later years. Fear of the Indians was never absent from the thoughts of the family in the backwoods.

The bottoms along Crow Creek were covered with maple trees, and the making of maple sugar in the spring was an important part of the life of this pioneer family. Sometimes 100 pounds or more of maple sugar would be stored under the ledges of the rocks at the lower end of the bottoms. It was during one of these sugar making times that the boys; John, Martin, and some of the smaller boys were one night engaged in boiling down the sugar water in the big bottom across the creek. Intending to work all night, they had brought meat to cook over the fire. The younger lads had grown sleepy as they sat watching the blazing fires, and had been put to bed in a hogshead turned upside down.

Suddenly the dogs bristled up, and ran out into the darkness, barking fiercely. Believing that the Indians were lurking nearby, the boys threw sugar water on the blaze to extinguish it. They awakened the sleeping boys, and together they went to the top of the hill on the opposite side of the creek. There they spent the rest of the night on a bed of leaves behind a log. They had taken their meat with them. and being afraid to light a fire, ate the meat raw. This time, however, the Indians did not appear.

When the elder boys of the Crow family grew into manhood, they were very fond of hunting. In the Spring of 1782, John, Martin, and Frederick Crow set forth on one of their frequent hunting trips. They were accompanied by two men from Fort Henry (now Wheeling). The expedition carried them down the river to the mouth of Big Fishing Creek, which empties into the Ohio River at New Martinsville. They had been informed that elk hunting was especially good in that region. Up that stream a few miles, at the site of the present town of Reader on the mouth of a branch creek, they established their camp. This stream has retained the name of Crow Run because of the events that occurred there over two centuries ago.

On the evening of the second day, as Frederick and Martin, who had been out in search of game during the day, were returning to camp and had nearly reached it, they were suddenly attacked by Indians and fired upon from the rear of the camp, which was built after the fashion of the old style sugar house. Frederick was shot in the left breast, the ball passing through his arm and severing the artery near the shoulder. At the same time Martin had a portion of one of his ears shot away. Frederick, seriously wounded and bleeding profusely, had started to run, being closely pursued by the Indians. He ran a distance of some three or four hundred yards when, looking back, he found that his pursuers were rapidly gaining upon him. Without hesitation, for he had no time to deliberate, he plunged into the waters of the creek, which were about waist deep, and waded across to the opposite bank. Instead of following him through the creek at once, they paused for a moment on the brink of the bank near the spot where he had entered the waters. On reaching the opposite bank he looked back to see whether they were following him, when one of the Indians hurled his tomahawk at him, which, fortunately, missed him, although it came in unpleasant proximity to his head. Their guns having been emptied at the time of the attack, they had had no opportunity to re-load. During their brief pause, however, one of his pursuers had reloaded his gun. They promptly re-commenced their pursuit, following him up the stream, the side of which he closely hugged, to a long point extending out from the south side of the creek, with which they were familiar, and where they expected to succeed in cutting him off, and effecting his capture. This, however, proved to be unsuccessful.

As the wounded man ran, he placed the leaves of the sassafras, which grew in abundance in the neighborhood, with which he filled his mouth, and chewed them into a mucilage and pressed them into his wound, thereby staunching the flow of blood, the free loss of which was beginning to enfeeble and exhaust him. Upon turning again to look back upon his pursuers he discovered an Indian with his gun to his shoulder taking aim and in the act of firing at him, but he eluded the bullet by quickly throwing himself upon the ground, and the shot passed over him. Jumping to his feet he gathered up his rifle. Realizing that it was a race for life he bent all his energies to the occasion. In the rapidly gathering darkness which was settling down upon the scene, he succeeded in eluding his pursuers and making good his escape.

Frederick and his companions, at their first setting out, had agreed upon certain signals to be used by them in case of emergency - such as the hooting of an owl or the howling of a wolf, by means of which in no long time the discovered the whereabouts of each other, and in company made their return to their homes, with the exception of John. It is supposed that this latter person, being absent at the time of the attack, on hearing the firing at once hastened back to the camp to render assistance if needed, and in so doing became a target for the Indians, as it was afterward found that five musket balls had entered his breast, which were so close together that they could be covered with the palm of a hand. He must have been instantly killed.

Martin remained in hiding quite a while. He felt that the stillness was foreboding. After some time had elapsed, he heard some more shots echoing across the valley in the direction of the camp. These were the shots that killed John Crow. After a second prolonged stillness that seemed to indicate that the Indians had departed, Martin ventured to imitate the sound of an owl as a signal to his companions, if by chance they were living. After two or three attempts, he was rewarded. Frederick, who was not far distant, gave an answering hoot. Hardly able to believe his ears, he signaled again, and so the two brothers got together. Their other two companions seemed to have escaped unharmed. The body of John Crow was found by his brothers at the side of the creek, near the camp, with his head partly submerged in the water. His breast had been pierced by five bullets, his throat slashed, and his scalp removed. They picked him up and placed him in a hollow sycamore tree, covering the body to protect it from the wolves, until they could return and give the remains a proper burial.

Hastening to Fort Henry, they returned with reinforcements to the scene of the tragedy. Only four days had elapsed. Wrapping the body in a blanket, it was interred beneath the sycamore tree, using walnut slabs for a coffin. The following inscription was carved on the tree:

J. J. CROW
1772

This living marker stood until 1875, when it was blown down.

In the small family grave lot on the old Crow homestead in Greene County, Pennsylvania, are crude stone markers bearing the date, 1791, and the initials: L. C., S. C., and K. C. They mark the graves of the three daughters of Jacob and Susannah Crow: Lisbeth, Susan, and Katherine, killed by Indians just across the creek, not far from the site of the old Crow home. This occurred on Sunday morning, May 1, 1791. The three girls, accompanied by their sister, Christina, were going to see an old couple that were nearby neighbors of the Crow family. They had stopped to play with a snake in a ripple of the creek, just below what is now known as Indian Rock. Their youngest brother, Michael, who had been after a stray horse up Crab Tree, came along on horseback going home. He stopped a moment to talk, and asked Christina if she didn't want to get up behind him and ride back home. She said she would rather go on with the girls. He then galloped down the creek, noticing that his horse snorted and pranced about uneasily. The horse had scented the Indians, who were hiding behind the rock, now bearing a historical inscription of the incident being related. No sooner had Michael ridden out of sight, then the Indians revealed themselves.

There were two Indians and one white renegade named Spicer in the party. They brandished their tomahawks to warn the girls to keep silent, and advanced to capture them. They led the girls up the creek to a little flat. One of the older girls said to Christina, the youngest: Pray to God to prepare us for what is before us." The Indians sat down on a log and asked them questions about the fort, etc. in the vicinity; Spicer doing all the talking for the Indians. One of the Indians who was seated between two of the youngest of the females held a tight grasp on the wrist of each. From their significant gestures and looks, and the conversation carried on between the three in the Indian tongue it was evident that they were discussing the disposition which they should make of their prisoners. The girls realized from what they saw and could understand that no mercy was to be extended to them; but that their death was determined upon, and that their fate was imminent. Then they prepared to kill the girls. Grasping the victims clasped hands with one of their own, each Indian proceeded to tomahawk a girl. When Spicer, who had to hold two girls, struck the larger, Christina jerked her hands loose and started to run.

Christina, the youngest, a bright and sprightly girl, had formed a resolution in her mind that, as death was to be her doom, she would, at the first propitious moment which presented itself, make a break for liberty. Hence, while her captors were engaged in the heat of the discussion and the vigilance of the Indian who held her wrist was somewhat relaxed, with a sudden effort she withdrew it from his grasp by a dexterous twist of her arm and springing to her feet darted away, but she had not taken but a step or two when she received a blow on her back with the butt end of the gun which, with his freed hand, he had snatched from the ground where it lay beside him. The blow prostrated her, but only for a moment, when promptly recovering herself she sped down the hill to the bank of the creek. Glancing over her shoulder as she ran, she saw Spicer strike her sister three times on the temple. She hastened along the creek to her home and carried the sad tidings of the capture of her sisters. The Indians might have overtaken her if they had been so disposed, but in that event the other sisters might have successfully made their escape, and therefore they refrained from pursuit. She escaped, and the Indians also made their get away.

As soon as Christina communicated the news to the distressed family, they made a hasty departure from their home and fled to Findley's block house for shelter and protection, due to the fact that the Crow fort was small and unprotected. It being late in the evening when they arrived there, no efforts could be made that night to overtake the captors and their prisoners, but with the first streaks of dawn on the following morning a party set out with a view of rescuing the prisoners and punishing their captors. Upon reaching the spot where the capture had occurred, to their horror and dismay they found that the tragedy, which they feared had been accomplished. They found the oldest girl - Elizabeth - still living, but fatally wounded. A little distance from where Elizabeth lay writhing in her pain were found the dead bodies of the two other sisters - Catherine and Susan. Elizabeth had been scalped, but not killed outright, and came to enough to crawl down to the creek to get a drink. Two days later she was found still alive by a hunter named Enlow, and carried to the shade of a clump of trees growing around the great boulder in the bottom, near the creek. Here the family returning with a posse of armed men, found her and her protector the same day. She retained sufficient vitality to give an intelligible account of the incident of their surprise and capture, together with the details of the aftermath, and the treatment which had been accorded them by the savages and the renegade Spicer. She survived until the third day after the event when she expired.

The Crow family, on two occasions, had suffered terribly at the hands of the Indians. Christina Crow was the sole survivor of the last tragedy related. Some years later, when she had grown to womanhood, the renegade, Spicer, and an Indian had the boldness to ride up to the Crow home one summer day and ask for a drink of buttermilk. The horn had just been blown for dinner, and Christina and her mother, Susannah, were in the garden gathering vegetables. Christina looked up and exclaimed to her mother. "Law, these are the very men that killed the girls!" The mother abruptly refused the request for buttermilk, and the men, probably suspecting that they had been recognized, rode hurriedly away. As the Crow men came in from the bottom, where they had been having a log rolling, they saw Spicer and the Indian, gay in bright colored blankets, riding down through the fields. One of the Crow boys took out his gun (they always went armed to work); and leveled it at a bright flower that adorned the blanket of the Indian and in play snapped the half cocked trigger. As soon as the log rollers reached the house, the women hastened to tell them who the strangers were. They all came into the house, except two of the Crow boys, who stood aloof in whispered conversation. These two boys ate a hasty dinner, shouldered their guns and started out on foot to follow Spicer and the Indian. For hours they walked as rapidly as they could uphill, and ran downhill on the level, easily following the fresh footprints. But those pursued must have sensed danger and trotted horses, for by nightfall they had not been overtaken by the Crow boys.

Discouraged and exhausted, the boys camped for the night. The next morning, they resumed the trail, going only a short distance before they found the campfire still smoldering. The outcome of the chase was never revealed. Peace had been made with the Indians, and it was a crime to kill an Indian. When questioned, neither of the boys would affirm or deny any accusations, but merely reply that they were close enough to count the buttons on the Indian's coat.

In a later incident involving Indians, two of the boys, Martin and Frederick, decided to go scouting into the Ohio. After going out about Coshocton, they came upon an Indian camp and at once concealed themselves to await darkness. It appears that the actions roughly paralleled that of the Indians when they attacked the boys, and killed their brother, John, on Fishing Creek. After a while, two Indian warriors came in, built a fire, and cooked their supper. Finally, one of them went into the tepee and lay down to sleep. When the other Indian departed, the Crow boys stole up to the tent, pulled up a peg and lifted the edge right by the Indians' head. One of the boys held up the flap while the other shot the Indian through the head. They jerked his blanket off, took his gun and belt for trophies, and made their way through the woods toward home. The Crow boys felt, no doubt, that they had in a measure accomplished something to square their account with the Indians.

Three of Jacob's grandsons fought in the Civil War on the side of the Union. Two of the boys, Thorton and Madison Crow fought at the battle of Bull Run and were killed. They are buried at Arlington Cemetery. Jacob died August 18, 1822, in Richhill, Greene County, Pennsylvania. Susan died a few years later. Both are buried in the family cemetery in Richhill Township, Greene County, Pennsylvania. Jacob Crow's will was as follows:

In the name of our Lord, amen I Jacob Crow of Richhill, Township Green County and State of Pennsylvania Being weak in body But of sound understanding and memory Blessed be God for it do this fourth day of November in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and Twenty one doth make and publish this last will and testament and desires that it may be Received By all as such in manner following that is to say first I will and positively order that my wife Susanah Crow to have Thirty Dollars per yeay out of the estate during her life time and secondly, I will and positively order that my son Frederick Crow shall have fifty Dollars more of the estate than any one of the rest of the Legetees and the said Frederick and all the legetees to have an equel part of the estate of the late deceased Jacob Crow at the decease of his wife Susanah Crow and thirdly I will and positively order that my wife shall have all the household furniture and one cow and lastly I make and ordain My Son Michael Grow and Moses Dunamore Sole Executrix of this my will in trust for the intent and purpose in this my will contained & in witness whereof I the said Jacob Grow have set my hand and seal the day and year above written

Test

signed Jacob Gro

his
John X Sicels
mark

Mary Crow

Penna Green County ss.

Personally appeared before me John Sicels and Mary Crow and on there solemn oaths did depose and say that they were present and saw and heard Jacob Crow the testator within named Sign, Seal publish and declare the same as and for his last will and Testament and at the time of doing thereof he was of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding according to the best of their knowledge observation and belief.

His
John X Sicels
mark

Mary Crow

Sworn and subscribed before me this 18th day of August 1823

Wm. T Hays

[the above preceeds what I first sent you]

REFERENCES

Crow Family:
"The Fireside Stories of the Jacob Crow Family", J. H. Crow, 1979, p. 5-9, 123-129
"The Memories and Writings of Harold David Somerville", Vol. 1, 1999, p. 184
"HISTORY OF THE UPPER OHIO VALLEY," Vol. I, Brant & Fuller, 1890.
Will of Jacob Crow, recorded in Green Co. PA Will Book 1, pg 228, File #408: www.FamilyTreeMaker.com cynthia-L-Starks

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Esther Crow Sailor
Birth: Sep. 9, 1782, Greene County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Sep. 9, 1853, Elkhart County, Indiana, USA

Sailor Cemetery no longer exists. It was located on the north side of County Road 32, approximately 600 feet west of County Road 3, in Olive Twp., just east of Baugo Creek. The remaining stones for this cemetery were copied in 1985. They had to be dug up as they had bulldozed and pushed to one side to make room for a poultry house. Only 8 stones were recovered that were still legible. It is believed that there were perhaps as many as 15-20 total burials at this site. Courtesy of Cemeteries of Elkhart County, Indiana, Volume 2, published by the Elkhart County Genealogical Society.

Family links: Spouse: Jacob Sailor (1777 - 1867); Children: Ann M Sailor Johnston (1815 - 1902)

Burial: Sailor Cemetery of Olive Township, Elkhart County, Indiana, USA

Created by: roots56
Record added: May 21, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 70172424 
CROW, Esther (I54)
 
150 (1) Des Moines County, IA Marriage Book #11, 30 April 1879 - 7 December 1882, p. 25:

Certificate #304 - HALE, Joseph F., 23; b. D. M. Co., IA; f. HALE, R.E.; m. BERKY, Malinda; br: MERCHANT, Susan, 28; b. Kent, Eng.; f. MERCHANT, William; m. SMITH, Susan; marr 21 Dec 1881 at Pleasant Grove by Rev. A. F. Fuller. 
Family F731
 

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