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Benjamin BRASSEUR

Male Abt 1620 - 1662  (~ 42 years)


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  • Name Benjamin BRASSEUR 
    Born Abt 1620  France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Name Benjamin BRASHEAR 
    Name Benjamin BRASSEURE 
    Name Benjamin BRASSIEUR 
    Name Bennet BRASHEAR 
    Name Bennet BRASSEUR 
    Name Bennet BRASSEURE 
    Name Bennet BRASSIEUR 
    Name Benois BRASHEAR 
    Name Benois BRASSEUR 
    Name Benois BRASSEURE 
    Name Benois BRASSIEUR 
    Name Benoist BRASHEAR 
    Name Benoist BRASSEUR 
    Name Benoist BRASSEURE 
    Name Benoist BRASSIEUR 
    Name Benoit BRASHEAR 
    Name Benoit BRASSEUR 
    Name Benoit BRASSEURE 
    Name Benoit BRASSIEUR 
    Name Benojs BRASSEUIR 
    Died Dec 1662  Calvert County, MD Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • (1) Brashear, Charles, A Brashear(s) Family History, Descendants of Robert and Benois Brasseur, Vol. 1, San Diego, CA: 1998, pp. 23-35:

      Not having the above data before them, earlier researchers have assumed that the Robert Brasseur in Virginia land records in 1636, 38, and 40, was Benjamin's older brother. We now believe that this was Benjamin's father and that Benjamin's brother, Robert was 5 or 6 years old at the time he was brought to Virginia, while Benjamin was probably 15 or 16. Court records at the time of Robert [Jr]'s death establish Benjamin and Robert [?Jr] as brothers.

      Also, many of the old records refer to Benjamin as the son of Robert Brasseur Sr. See, for example, the Register of Huguenot Ancestors; the Virkus Compendium of American Genealogy, pp. 604, 796; Orra Eugene Monette's Monette Family and "Genealogical Notes Concerning Brassieur Family of Virginia and Maryland."

      Benois (Benoit, Bennet, Benjamin) Brasseur (Brassieur, Brashieur, Brashears, Brashear), the man with so many different spellings to his name, was born c1620 in France and was transported (apparently as a teenager) to VA; m. prob. c1645, VA, Mary/Marie ?Richford, b. prob England. We have no documents, just the circumstance that Benois paid passage for a Mary Richford from England to VA; we have assumed she became his wife. She always called herself Mary; some of the Frenchmen around her called her Marie.

      Benois is first mentioned in the records of Virginia, 12 April 1653, when he appears as a headright on Robert Brasseur's 1200-acre land grant (see data previous chapter). If born in 1620, he was about 33 years old.

      Also on 12 Apr 1653 (the same day as Robert Brasseur's grant), Benjamin Brasseur (Robert's son) received a patent for 300 acres on "a creeke called Indian Creeke being a branch of Nansemum river" for transporting six people: Charles Drury, Richard Bateman, Mary Richford [possibly his wife-to-be], Hump. Evans, Hugh Edwards, and John Harris. (Va. Land Patents, Book 3, p.33.)

      On 26 Mar 1656, this patent was renewed, apparently to take care of some legal technicality: "Benjamin Brasseur, patent to 300 acres at the head of Indian Creek, a branch of Nansemond River. Being due the said Benjamin by a former patent dated 12 April 1653." (Book 4, p. 40).

      This Benjamin was the same as the Bennet Brasseur named as a "headright" in Robert Brasseur's patent. His name is spelled variously as Bennet, Benoit, Benois, Benoist, and Benjamin. As H.D. Richardson remarks in Side-Lights on Maryland History (published 1908, v.1, p.226): "One of the most striking examples of the diversity of spelling in a single name is that of the French Huguenot, Benojs Brasseuir, who came to Maryland from Virginia in 1658 and was naturalized in 1662. After this the spelling of his name and that of his descendants has varied as follows: Brassieur, Brasseur, Brashieur, Brusher, Brasshear, and Brashears." And we might add that, by c1700, "Brashear" had become the most common spelling, followed by Brashears, Brashers, and Brasher, though the spellings are used pretty much interchangeably, sometimes within the same document.

      UPPER BENNETT

      After 1658, Benois appears in the records of Calvert Co, MD and a tract of land called "Upper Bennett." Calvert Co was created in 1654 from a portion of St. Mary's Co. The same year, its name was changed to Patuxent Co, then returned to Calvert in 1658. In 1695, when Prince Georges County was cut off, the boundaries were re-defined, and the boundary with Anne Arundel Co was re-defined in 1824-25.

      In 1658, Benjamin (Benois) contracted to buy a 1150-acre tract of land from Richard Bennett, moved his family from Virginia to Calvert County, Maryland, and settled on "Upper Bennett," which overlooks Chesapeake Bay, in an area known as "The Cliffs." The land came with a house, barns, stock, and slaves. "Upper Bennett" is a strip of land about a mile and a quarter wide, which begins in the south edge of present-day Chesapeake Beach, includes Randle Cliff Beach and about half of the U.S. Navy Reservation. . . .

      Richard Bennett was a wealthy merchant of Virginia, nephew and agent of one of the original members of the Virginia Charter, and an ardent Puritan. Early on, he had acquired several tracts of land in Maryland, including a 2500-acre plantation in two tracts on "The Cliffs." He seems to have been thinking of creating havens for persecuted Puritans. The Cromwellian revolution in England led to his appointment as colonial Governor of Virginia and the possibility of the disestablishment of the Anglican Church in the colony. As governor, he annexed Maryland to Virginia (though Parliament immediately set his action aside) and was on his way to a show-down with the wealthy planters of Virginia, the "Cavalier" class. But he was in trouble with the authorities. He may have been looking for an easy "out."

      Apparently, Robert and Benjamin's land in Nansemond was not very good. Earlier, Governor Byrd had visited Nansemond and the Indian village that bordered on Robert's 1200-acre patent. He said the Indians were a hapless lot and the whites thereabouts not much better off. He said the tobacco was the poorest in quality of all Virginia and that no Anglican preacher of the slightest merit would accept a parish there. (The vicar was a rascal who worked with the Sheriff in seizing property "taken for the priest's dues," which was one of the persecutions that Puritans and Quakers were subject to, because they were reluctant to pay Anglican taxes and tithes. . . . ) When Richard Bennett offered to sell Benjamin Brashear the upper 1150 acres of his plantation in Maryland, he was offering him an "out" to more than one problem.

      Richard Bennett had this plantation surveyed in 1651:

      To the Honorable the Lieut. Generall . . .

      Oct 25th 1651

      Laid out for Richard Bennett of the County of Ann Arundell, Esq, a Tract of Land lying on the west side of Chesapeake Bay next adjoyning to the Land of Thomas Marsh, Merchant, Beginning at the South bound[ary] Tree of the said Marsh being a Mulberry Tree and running South down the Bay for the length of four hundred seventy and five Perches [rods] unto a marked Mulberry Tree and bounding on the South with a line drawn West from the said Mulberry Tree for the length of four hundred Perches, on the West with a line drawn North from the End of the Western line unto the Land of the said Thomas Marsh, on the North with the said Land, on the East with the said Bay, Containing and now laid out for One Thousand One hundred and fifty acres more or less.

      /s/ Robert Clark, Surveyor

      And the grant was made official in 1658:

      CAECILIUS Absolute Lord and Proprietary of the Province of Maryland and Avalon, Lord Baron of Baltimore, &c. To all Persons to whom these Presents shall come, greeting in Our Lord God Everlasting, Know yee that Wee for and in Consideration that Richard Bennett Esq hath Transported Twelve Able Persons into this Our Province in Anno 1649 here to Inhabitt and upon such Condition and Termes as are Expressed in Conditions of Plantation of our said Province of Maryland under our greater Seal at Armes bearing date at London the Second day of July in the Year of our Lord God 1649 aforesaid, and remaining upon Record in our said Province, Do hereby grant to the. said Richard Bennett all that Tract of Land lying on the West side of Chesasapeake Bay next adjoyning to the land formerly Surveyed for Thomas Marsh, Merchant, Beginning at the South bound Tree of the said Marsh being a Mulberry Tree and runing South down the Bay for the length of four hundred Seventy and five Perches unto a marked Mulberry Tree and bounding on the South with a line drawn West from the said Mulberry Tree for the length of four hundred Perches, On the West with a line drawn North from the end of the former line unto the land of the said Thomas Marsh, On the North with the said Land, On the East with the said Bay, Containing One thousand One hundred and Fifty acres more of less, Together with all Proffitts, Rights, and Benifits thereunto belonging (Royal Mines Excepted), To have and to hold the same unto him the said Richard Bennett his heires and assignes for ever. To be holden of this and Our heires as of Our Manner of St. Maries in Free and Common ?Souage? [Soccage] by Fealty only for all services. Yielding and Paying therefore Yearly unto us and our heires att Our Receipt of St. Maries [St. Mary's was the provincial capital and seat of government] at the two most usual Feasts in the Year, Vizt, at the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary and at the Feast of St. Michael the Arch-Angel by even and equall portions the Rent of three and twenty Shillings Sterling in Silver or Gold or the full Value thereof in such Commodities as Wee and our heires or such Officer or Officers appointed by Us or Our heires from time to time to Collect and Receive the same shall, accept in Discharge thereof, At the choice of Us and Our heires or such Officer or Officers as aforesaid. given at St. Maries under the Great Seal of our said Province of Maryland the Eighteenth Day of August in the 27th Year of Our Dominion over this said Province and in the Year of our Lord God 1658. Witness Our Trusty and Well beloved Josias Tindall, Esqr, Our Lieutenant of Our said Province. . . .

      Intrat? in Record

      Phillip Calvert, Lieut

      /s/ Josias Tendall

      This Grant is according to Certificate and Survey by me made
      Robert Clark, Surveyor

      This plantation came with a house, stock, and servants. Early in 1658, Bennett had apparently built the house, into which Benjamin Brasseur moved his family late in 1658. The contract to buy had still not been settled when Benjamin died some four or five years later, for Benjamin had been unsatisfied with the land "in point of quantity." Benjamin may have wanted to trade his unused headrights for the plantation, but since his headrights were to 1450 acres, he may have wanted more land.

      The house at Upper Bennett was a typical kind of house for the times: two big rooms on the ground floor (twenty-two feet square), separated by a 12-footby-22-foot "hallway" between them. Upstairs were two big, dormitory-style sleeping lofts with short walls and four dormer windows in at least the east side. There was probably a stairway (maybe two) in the hallway. I've seen cases further west where the upstairs was reached by ladders, one for the boys' wing and one for the girls'. Two big fireplaces, one at each end of the house, warmed the big rooms (and the sleeping lofts by convection).

      This architectural style evolved from the frontier practice of building two log cabins alligned with each other and covering them with a single roof. The passageway between was sometimes left open, sometimes closed in. In frontier Tennessee, it was called a "dog trot."

      Apparently, the first addition to the basic house was a porch all across the front, then the east side: 8 feet wide by 56 feet long. Its roof tied on just under the dormer windows of the upstairs, some of the old photographs show the porch and dormers clearly. The porch used to be open, except for a two-rail balustrade, but was later screened in above a wainscot-height wall.

      At about the time of the Civil War, someone (?The Chew family) added three ground-floor rooms on the west side, a divided stairway with a landing half-way up, and two bedrooms upstairs. At that time, the west-facing roof was re-built with a different slope from the original. It runs from the original ridge to just above the west-facing windows. A little porch, or weather room, was also added on the west; this had the effect of making the west the front of the house.

      Later, a one-story kitchen area was added to the south end of this addition-and later still, the modern family room was added to the north end.

      In 1991, the house was seriously, perhaps irreparably damaged by fire. The fire broke out in the kitchen area, spread rapidly into the upper floor and then into the attic. It went all the way to the north end of the attic. The modern family room, the least interesting part, was not damaged at all. This seems to me like a very sad end to one of the oldest houses in Maryland. . . .

      BENJAMIN BRASHEAR, CITIZEN

      In order to encourage settlement in Maryland, Lord Baltimore offered 50 acres of land to anyone who moved there or transported a person there. These rights were separate from headrights in Virginia. Thus, it can happen that a person who had already claimed headrights in Virginia could move to Maryland and collect another 50 acres.

      In Early Settlers of Maryland, by Gust Skordas, the family is listed thus:

      Brasheer, Thomas Bk. 15 p. 414 Transported 1677 (15, fo. 403)
      Brashier, Ann Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658
      Brashier, Benjamin, Jr Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1663
      Brashier, Benjamin, Sr Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658
      Brashier, Elizabeth Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1663
      Brashier, John Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1663
      Brashier, Martha Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658
      Brashier, Mary, Sr Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658
      Brashier, Robert, Jr Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658
      Brashier, Robert, Sr Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658-63
      Brashier, Susanna Bk. 6 p. 63 Transported 1658
      Brashier, Thomas Bk. 15 p. 430 Transported 1677

      That is to say, Benjamin Brashier Sr (Benois) and Mary Brashier Sr, are listed in Patent Book 6, p.63 with their children, all claiming headrights: most of them in 1658; Benjamin Jr, Elizabeth, and John in 1663. All were transported, presumably by Benois (his widow, Mary, claimed the unused rights in 1663. . . ). Robert Brashier Sr, Benjamin's brother (and/or father?), is listed in the same reference, with both 1658 and 1663 as dates; it would be interesting to see if these records refer to different men, but that cannot be determined from Skordas's records. Mary Jr was presumably not listed because she was born in Maryland and, thus, was ineligible. Thomas Brasheer/Brashier may be Benois' brother. . . .

      Benjamin moved his family to "Upper Bennett" in 1658 and was soon recognized as a prosperous citizen of Calvert County.

      In 1660, "Benjamin Brasheers" was called to serve on the Grand Jury for Calvert Co. (Maryland Archives, v.41, p.419)

      In Jun 1661, Thomas Sprigge, Thomas Trueman, Thomas Manning, Thomas Brookes, George Peake, Francis Anketill, Hugh Stanley, Charles Brooke, Rich Collete, John Elzy, Toby Norton, Thomas Letchworth, Benjamin Brassieur, and William Turner, were appointed Commissioners of Calvert County, "whereof the foure first are of the Quorum and James Thompson Clk." (Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1660-1661, p.424) This appointment indicates social position and the trust of his neighbors. It also indicates he could read and write English well. (Maryland Archives, v.3, p.424 has the same appointment for "Benja Brasheer."). Later that year, "Benjamyn Brashere" was subpoenaed to testify. (same ref. p.511)

      On 4 Dec 1662, Benjamin, his wife, and their children were naturalized in Maryland, by Charles Calvert himself. The "Dennization of Benois Brasseuir" reads, in part:

      C??cilus absolute Lord &, proprietary of the province of Maryland and Avalon, Lord Barron of Baltemore &c. To all persons to whome these presents shall come Greetinge In our Lord God Everlasting . . . WHEREAS, Benois Brasseuir, late of Virginia and Subject of the Crowne of France, having transported himeselfe, his wife and children into the Province here to inhabite, hath besought us to grant hime, the said Benois Brasseuir, leave here to inhabite, and, as a free dennizen, freedome land to hime and his heires to purchase;

      KNOW yee that wee, willing to give due encouragement to other subjects of that Crowne, doe hereby declare them, the said Benois Brasseuir, his wife & children, as well those allready borne as those hereafter to bee borne, to bee free dennizens of this our Province of Maryland; and doe further for us, our heires & successors enjoyne, constitute, ordeine, and command that the said Benois Brasseiur be in all things held, treated, and esteemed as one of the faythfull people of us, our heires and successors, borne within this our Province of Maryland. . . .

      . . . without the lest molestation vexation trouble or greivance of us. . . .

      Given at St Marys under the great seale of our said province of maryland this fourthe Day of Decemb. Anno Domini One thousand Six hundred Sixty two. Witness our deare sonn and heire Charles Calvert, Esqr, Our Lieutenant of our Said Province of maryland

      signed Charles Calvert

      The document is on file in Council Proceedings, Book HH, p.157; see also the Archives of Maryland, v.III, p.485. It emphasizes that Benois (Benjamin) is a free resident of the province, with freedom to own land, etc, and not to lose it through escheatment, as did his brother, John Brasseur, of Nansemond Co, VA; that is, he is to have all the rights of a natural born citizen, as one "borne within this our Province cf Maryland."

      It was apparently the first such naturalization record and serves as a model for later naturalizations. For example: in the Council Proceedings, p.489, in 1662, "Pattents of Dennizacon to Thomas Lamore and Peter Lamore of French descent. Ut est folio 157, mutatis mutandis to Benois Brassieurs." [Mutatis mutandis is Latin, meaning "the changes having been made," that is, the Naturalization is to read exactly the same, except for the changed names.] On p.513: "February 22th, 1664. By the Lieutenant Generall Ordered, Antonie Le Compete hay pattent of Dennizacon to him his wife and children. Mutatis Mutandis in folio 157 to Benois Brasseurs." On p.529: July 13th, 1665: "By Order from the Leiutennt Generall then Nicholas Fountaine late of Virginia and Subject of the Crowne of France had Pattent of Dennnezacon of this provence. Idem Mutatis Mutandis ut est verbatim pro Benjamin Brasseuir in folio 157." (Note the variants spellings of Benjamin's surname. One of my French friends tells me that the spelling, Brasseuir, is unpronounceable, because it is not a sequence of letters that occurs in French.)

      BENJAMIN'S ESTATE

      Benjamin died (rather suddenly?) soon after his Naturalization, at about the age of 42, if we take 1620 as his birthdate. We have found no will, but in the Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland, is "An Inventory of the goods and chattalls of Benjamin Brassear, gent., late of Calvert County, and appraised by us James Thomas and John Cobreath, this 24th day of February, 1663/4." (Inventories, Book 1E, p. 92.) [Note that the appraiser, John Cobreath, was also the executor of the will of Robert Brasheur "Elder" the next year, and received an acre of land, a barn, and some cattle. He was apparently a brother-in-law.]

      The inventory indicates that Benjamin was a wealthy man. It includes several feather beds and bolsters, blankets, pillows, chairs, chests, cabinets, cupboards, household goods such as candlesticks and pots and pans. One trunk contained "sixteen pairs of sheets, a pair of pillow bears, two holland shirts, thirteen Diaz napkins, three Diaz tablecloths, one cubbard cloth, one mantle, one holland tablecloath, twelve oxenbridge napkins, two towells, one Mantle of woolen. . . ."

      Benjamin owned several pieces of silver-tankards, cups, spoons, chimes, whistles, a silver hatband-and a gold seal ring. Perhaps more practical, he had a good supply of gunpowder (ninety pounds!) and a certain amount of bar iron for manufacturing whatever implement happened to be needed. He had two dozen peregrine falcons, used for sport hunting.

      His livestock included "eleven barrows and two boars of about 2 years old, twentyseven hogg sowes and barrows of about 2 years old apiece, twentyfive piggs and shoats under a year old, twelve cowes and calves, six cowes more, three stears of four years old, three stears of two years old, two hogs of two years old, and eight servts" (valued at almost as much as all the other livestock put together. At least one negro woman-Sarah-came with the land, and, in her will in 1663, Mary promised each child a servant when he/she came of age.)

      Benjamin was obviously a man of much substance.

      MARY, WIDOW OF THE CLIFFS

      Mary was left, a young widow (probably under 40), with eight children ranging in age from about 2 to about 16, and no property. She had to be a woman of great resources and courage, for she moved immediately to consolidate her position. She either fulfilled Benjamin's contract to purchase "Upper Bennet" or made one of her own:

      Knowe all men by these presents that I, Richard Bennitt, of Virginia, merchant, doe hereby alien, sell, and conveigh unto Mary Brasseur, widdow of the Clifts, in the Provence of Maryland, and to her heires forever, all my right, title, and interest in that parcell of land on which she now lives, being eleaven hundred and fifty acres more or lesse, together with all stock of servants, cattle, hoggs, and whatever else thereupon or thereunto any wayes belonging or appertayning for and in consideracon of two hundred and twenty hoggsheads of tobacco [about 110,000 pounds] to bee paid according to speciallty und'r her hand and seale, bearing date with these presents, all which land w'th the servants, cattle, &c. aforesaid were formerly treated and bargained to bee sold unto Mr. Benois Brasseur, in his life time, which became void by reason of defect and dislike in relagon to the said land in point of quantity, and because hee, the said Brasseur, never had any livery and seison thereof from mee, nor never paid any thinge att all to mee for it, in which regard [I] have now bargained, sold, and delivered the said estate of land, &c. unto the aforesaid Mary Brasseur and her heires aforesaid, and doe promise and binde myself, my heires, executors, and administrators to make such further conveighance and assurance of the premisses as is requisite and as it layes in my power to doe whensoever the same shall be demanded or required.

      The servants names are as followeth: Tho. Smyth, Geo. Davison, William Whitehead, Tho. Frost, and Sarah - a negro woman.

      I doe allso hereby give unto the said widd'w Brasseur full, quiett possession of the afforesaid land, servants, cattle, hoggs, &c., with warantee ag'st all or any person or persons whatsoever clayming any right thereunto by, from or under mee or my heires.

      In witness whereof, I have hereunto sett my hand seale the 17th day of Aprill, 1663.

      Richard Bennett

      Sealed, subscribed and delivered in pr'sence of: Thomas Sterling, Robert Brasseur.

      (Provincial Court Proceedings, 1663-1664, Maryland (Bound volume in DAR Library, Wash, DC, p. 178); Maryland Land Patents, Book BB, p.238; Maryland Archives, v.41, p.178.)

      The servants' names appearing this way would suggest that they were Bennett's indentured servants, but at least Frost had come to Virginia as a free man and all of them are claimed as Maryland headrights due Benjamin, filed in Maryland in 1663. I don't have an explanation for how Benjamin's headrights got on Bennett's deed, or vice versa, but something looks a bit suspicious to me.

      On May 25, 1663, Mary Brasseur, widow of "The Clifts," made and filed her will (MdHR, Wins, Book 1, pp.187-89) as part of a prenuptial contract with Thomas Sterling, whom she married after 25 July and before 2 August 1663. In the will, she named her children by her former husband and secured to them their inheritance from his estate. We are not certain about the order of the children, except that Robert was the oldest, Mary was the youngest, the only one born in Maryland, and we have birthdates for some others from descendants; some of the girls may have been interspersed with the boys. The boys were all less than 21 years old, the girls all less than 16:

      Children of Benjamin (Benois) and Mary Brasseur . . . : . . .

      1. Robert Brasseur/Brashier III, . . . b. 1646, d. 1712; m.1. _____ (mother of the children); m.2. Mrs. Alice Jackson, wid/o Thomas Jackson. . . .

      2 . Benjamin Brasseur/Brashear Jr, . . . ; d. unmarried Feb. 1675. . . .

      3. John Brasseur/Brashear, . . . b. c1650 says IGI 5002486/15; d. 1696, m. Anne Dalrymple. Died without children. . . .

      4. Anne Brasseur/Brashear, . . . m. c1685, William Dalrymple Jr. . . .

      5. Susannah Brasseur/Brashear, . . . b. 1650, Nansemond Co, VA; d. 1692, Anne Arundel Co, MD; m. 1679, Mareen Duvall. . . .

      6 . Elizabeth Brasseur/Brashear, . . . b. c1654, Nansemond Co, VA; d. 17 Jan 1728/29, Baltimore City, MD; m. John Sellman, and lived Anne Arundel Co, MD. . . .

      7. Martha Brasseur/Brashear, . . . b. Virginia, after Feb 1658/59 (under 17 on 19 Feb 1675/76 when her brother, Benjamin, died; a 1658 birthdate would make her 16 when she m. Henry Kent Jr, in 1674.) Martha d. 1688. . . .

      8. Mary Brasseur/Brashear, . . . b. c1660, Calvert Co, MD, d. 23 Jan 1702, Prince Georges Co, MD; m. c1688, Christopher Ellis.

      (2) Bennet BRASSEUR, aka Benjamin BRASSEUR, aka Benjamin BRASSEURE, is mentioned in the the following land patents:

      Virginia Colonial Records, 1600s-1700s [database online], Genealogy.com:

      Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 3, p. 244

      ROBERT BRASSEUR, 1200 acs. Nanzemond Co., 12 Apr. 1653, p. 33. At the head of the southerne branch of Nanzemond Riv., 600 acs. lying on the S. side of the branch & the other 600 on the N. side. Beg. on the N. side &c. joining land of Adrian Buny. On the S. side, being an Indian Towne, beg. at a marked pine standing on a bancke by the branch side, joining land of Wm. Haines &c. Trans. of 24 pers: Marg. Stockwell, Geo. Juory (or Ivory), Robt. Brasseur, Florence his wife, Mary Brasseur, Persid (or Persie) Brasseur, Kathe. Brasseur, Bennet Brasseur, Wm. Wotton, Tho. Parker, Jon. Sutton, Jon. Stephens, Step Dordon, Jon. Loyd. Jon. Bott, Symon Iron, Jon. Barefeild, Eliz. Pateman, Geo. Daldye, Wm. Ball, Nicho. Moroise (?), Tho. Pursell, Ra. Ellis, Jon. Abby.

      Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 3, p. 257:

      BENJAMIN BRASSEUR, 300 acs. at the head of Indian Cr, a branch of the Western br. of Nansemun Riv., joyning land of Mr. John Parrett (altered-may be Garrett). 12 Apr. 1653, p. 89. Trans. of 6 pers: Charles Drurey, Richard Bateman, Mary Richford, Humph. Evan, Hugh Edwards, John Harris.

      BENJAMIN BRASSEURE, 300 acs. at the head of Indian Cr, a branch of the W. branch of Nancemond Riv., adj. land of Mr. John Garrat. 26 Mar. 1656, p. 26, (40). Renewal of patent to him dated 12 Apr. 1653.

      (3) Maryland State Archives < http://www.mdarchives.state.md.us >:

      Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1636-1667:

      Vol. 3, p. 424 (1661):

      Comrs for Calvert County-Jdem Comon and oathe to Thomas Sprigge Thomas Trueman Thomas Manning Thomas Brookes George Peake Francis Anketill Hugh Stanley Charles Brooke Rich Collett John Elzy Toby Norton Thomas Letchworth Benjamin Brassieur and William Turner whereof the fuure first are of the Quorum and James Thompson Clk. . . .

      * * *

      Vol. 3, pp. 465-466 (December 4, 1662):

      [Denization of B. Brasseuir.]

      Csecilius absolute Lord & proprietary of the prouince of Maryland & Aualon Lord Barren of Baltemore &c. To all persons to whome these presents shall come Greetinge In our Lord God Euerlasting Wheras Benojs Brasseuir late of Virginia and Subject of the Crowne of france hauing transported himeselfe his wife and Children into this Prouince here to inhabite hath besought us to grant hime the said Benojs Brasseuir leaue here to inhabite and as a free Dennizen freedome land to hime and his heires to purchase Knowe yee that wee willing to giue due encouragement to the Subjects of that Crowne Doe hereby De Clare them the said Benojs Brasseuir his wife & Children as well those allready borne as those hereafter to bee borne to bee free Dennizens of this our prouince of Maryland And doe further for us our heires & Successors straightly Enioyne Constitute ordeine and Command that the said Benojs Brasseuir be in all things held treated reputed and esteemed as one of the faythfull people of us our heires & Successors borne within this our prouince of Maryland And likewise any lands Tenements Reuenues Seruices and other heriditamts whatsoeuer within our said prouince of Maryland may inhirite or otherwise purchase receiue take haue hold buy and possess and them may occupie and enjoy Giue Sell alyen and bequeath as likewise all libertyes franchises priuiledges of this our prouince of maryland freely quietly and peaceably haue and possess occupie and enjoy as our faythfull people borne or to bee borne within our said prouince of maryland without the lett molestations uexacon trouble or Greiuance of us or heires and Successors any Custome to the Contrary hereof in any wise notwithstanding, Giuen att St Marys under the great Seale of our said prouince of maryland this fourth day of Decembr in the One and thirtyth yeare of Our Dominion ouer the said prouince Annoq Domini One thowsand Six hundred Sixty two Wittnes our deare Sonn and heire Charles Caluert Esqr Our Leiuetennt of Our Said Prouince of maryland

      Signed Charles Caluert

      * * *

      Vol. 3, p. 489 (1663):

      Patients of Dennizacon To Thomas Lamore and Peter Lamore of french descent ut est folio 157 mutatis mutandis to Benois Brassieurs

      * * *

      Vol. 3, p. 513 (February 22, 1664):

      By the Leiutennt Generall Ordered, Antoine Le Compte haue Pattent of Dennizacon to him his wife and Children Mutatis Mutandis in folio 157 To Benois Brasseurs

      * * *

      Vol. 3, p. 514 (March 1665):

      By Order from the Leiutennt Generall
      Ordred Gasper Guerin haue pattent of Dennizacon to him and his heires
      Mutatis Mutandis in folio 157 To Benois Brassieurs

      * * *

      Vol. 3, p. 529 (July 13, 1665):

      By Ordr from the Leiutennt Generall then Nicholas ffountaine late of Virga and Subject of the Crowne of france had Pattent of Dennizacon for this prouince

      Idem Mutatis Mutandis ut est uerbatim pro Benjamin Brasseuir in folio 157

      Dated ut Supra
    Person ID I9195  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 

    Father Robert BRASSEUR, Sr.,   b. Abt 1598, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1666, Nansemond County [now Suffolk (Independent City)], VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F87  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary RICHFORD[?],   b. Abt 1628,   d. Aft 25 May 1663, Calvert County, MD Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Married 1645  VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Robert BRASSEUR, III,   b. 1646, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1712  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
     2. John BRASSEUR,   b. Abt 1650, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1696  (Age ~ 46 years)  [natural]
     3. Susannah BRASSEUR,   b. 1650, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1692, Anne Arundel County, MD Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)  [natural]
     4. Elizabeth BRASSEUR,   b. Abt 1654, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 1729, Baltimore, MD Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years)  [natural]
     5. Martha BRASSEUR,   b. Aft Feb 1659, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1688  (Age < 28 years)  [natural]
     6. Mary BRASSEUR,   b. Abt 1660, Calvert County, MD Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jan 1702, Prince George's County, MD Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 42 years)  [natural]
     7. Benjamin BRASSEUR, Jr.,   b. VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Feb 1675  [natural]
     8. Anne BRASSEUR,   b. VA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 13:23:14 
    Family ID F4417  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart