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William FROST, Sr.

Male Abt 1710 - 1775  (~ 65 years)


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  • Name William FROST, Sr. 
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born Abt 1710 
    Gender Male 
    Will 21 Aug 1774  Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1775  Frederick [now Clarke] County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Probate 07 May 1776  Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • (1) John FROST and William FROST, Sr. have been proven, based on DNA tests of their descendants, to have had a common FROST ancestor, although the compiler does not know who that ancestor was. Most persons who have considered the question believe that William FROST, Sr. was a son of John FROST, but the compiler has no conclusive proof of such relationship. William FROST, Sr. is shown here as a son of John FROST in order to stimulate further research.

      (2) O'Dell, Cecil, Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia, Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing Company, 1995, pp. 196-197:

      FROST

      On 10 February 1735/36, James Wood surveyed 1,632 acres for William Frost (b. 1710 c.); this land which Wood designated as being on Little Cape Capon was actually on Back Creek. Frost did not get a Colonial patent or Fairfax grant for this land. He did acquire several Fairfax grants later, including 400 acres (a part of his old 1735/36 survey and where Frost lived), surveyed on 27 October 1750, and a grant was issued on 3 March 1753). This tract was located in Berkeley County, West Virginia on Back Creek, ¾ mile south of Glengary, West Virginia on County Highway 22 at the junction with County Highway 22/1. . . .

      On 20 November 1754, he received another grant for 400 acres (surveyed on 29 October 1750) on both sides of Back Creek where he had a settlement. . . . This 400 acres is located about one mile south of the other 400 acres in Frederick County, Virginia at DeHaven, Virginia at the mouth of Babb's Creek on County Highway 671, 740 and 741.

      William also received two other Fairfax grants. One was for 239 acres granted on 26 April 1753 (surveyed 19 March 1749/50) which he purchased from Joseph Botchum, and the other was for 114 acres located adjacent to the 239-acre tract and to Philip Dorset, granted on 3 October 1766 (surveyed on 13 March 1754). These tracts are located in Berkeley County, West Virginia on the east side of Back Creek about ¼ mile northeast of Glengary, West Virginia. West Virginia Highway 45 is on the south side and Berkeley County Highway 7/25 runs north to south through the land.

      William had moved from the Back Creek area by 9 July 1756 when he purchased 455 acres from John Casine/Cazine and his wife Deborah for 60 pounds in present-day Clarke County, Virginia. On 1 August 1774, he purchased 61 acres adjacent west of the 455 acres from Warner Washington and his wife Hannah. These tracts are located north of Webbtown, Virginia, on County Highway 608 at the junction with 609 and 612, north of Virginia Highway 7 about 1½ miles.

      William Frost's will was written on 21 August 1774 and proved on 7 May 1776. He willed the 239-acre tract and 114-acre tract (350 acres) located at Shanghai, Berkeley County, West Virginia to his son William. William Jr. died in 1800 in Frederick County, Virginia.

      William Sr. willed 400 acres on Back Creek to be equally divided between his sons John and Thomas Frost. John died in 1777 and Thomas (b. 1745) [sic, should be Isaac (b. abt 1746)] died in 1774 en route home from an expedition of Dunmore's, an Indian campaign led by the British Colonial Governor of Virginia. Thomas left his wife Elizabeth [sic; Thomas did not die until 1822].

      Sons Isaac and Abraham Frost received the other 400-acre grant land on Back Creek. Isaac died intestate in 1774.

      Sons Jacob and Amos Frost were willed the 455-acre and 61-acre tracts in Clarke County, Virginia. Their mother Hannah, wife of William Sr., was to receive income from the two tracts. William listed seven daughters in his will; Frances, Elizabeth, Martha, Ellen, Anna, Mary (wife of Jacob Larew in Kentucky by 1807) and Hannah (wife of John Mason).

      (3) Dorman, John F., Orange County, Virginia Will Book I, 1735-1743, Washington, DC: 1958, p. 28:

      On or about November 23, 1740, William Frost, Sr. attended a sale of items from the estate of Micah Shepherd, deceased. William bought the following items at the sale: pockett [sic] compass, £0.4.0; pare [sic] of boots, £0.4.0; and sundry rubbage [sic], £0.1.1.

      John Frost was also present at the sale. He bought the following items at the sale: common prayer book and book of notes, £0.13.6; knife and other small articles, £0.1.3; razor, £0.3.6; pare [sic] shoes, £0.4.0; and saddle, £2.0.0.

      Other purchasers at the sale were Richard Abrell, John Downey, John Littler, William McMahon, John Mead, John Neill, Hugh Parill, Isaac Parkins, Joseph Stanley and Edward Sweetapple.

      (4) Northern Neck Grants Book H, p. 249:

      Fairfax Deed Dated 3 March 1753 to William Frost [Sr.] for 400 Acres of Land in Frederick County, VA:

      The Right Honourable Thomas Lord Fairfax Baron of Cameron in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland & proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia: To all to whom this present Writing shall come, sends greeting, Know ye that for good Causes; for and in Consideration of the Composition to me paid, and for the annual Rent hereafter Reserved, I have given granted and Confirmed, and by these presents for me, my heirs & Assigns, do give grant and Confirm unto William Frost of Frederick County a Certain Tract of Waste and ungranted Land, in the said County Lying on Both sides [of] Back Creek, and bounded as by a Survey thereof Made by Mr. John Mauzy as followeth: Beginning at A a large poplar on the S.W.[?] side of Back Creek, thence S.W.[?] 160 poles to B a Corner White oak on a hill side, thence N.W. 220 poles to C a young White Oak, & a young pine, thence N.W. passing the said Creek 291 poles to D four young pines on the side of a piney hill, thence S.W. 220 poles to E three pines and a scrubby White oak on the side of a piney hill, thence S.W.[?] 131 poles to the beginning. Containing four hundred Acres, Together With all Rights, Members, and Appurtenances thereunto belonging; Royal Mines excepted and a full Third part of all Lead, Copper, Tinn [sic], Coals, Iron Mines, and Iron Ore, That shall be found thereon: To have and hold the said four hundred Acres of Land; Together With all Rights Profits and Benefits to the same belonging, or in any Wise appertaining: Except before & Except: to him the said William Frost his heirs and Assigns for Ever, He the said Wm. Frost his Heirs and Assigns therefore yielding and paying to me My heirs and assigns, or to my certain Attorney or Attornies [sic], Agent or Agents or to the certain Attorney or Attornies [sic], Agent or Agents of my heirs or assigns, proprietors of the said Northern Neck; yearly and Every year on the feast day of St. Michael the Archangel; The Fee Rent of one shilling sterling for Every fifty Acres of Land hereby granted; and so proportionably for a greater or lesser Quantity; Provided that if the said William Frost, his heirs or assigns shall not pay the before Reserved Annual Rent or that the same or any part thereof shall be behind or unpaid by the space of two Whole years after The same shall become due, if lawfully demanded, That then it shall and may be lawful for me my heirs or assigns, proprietors as aforesaid; my or their Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic], Agent or Agents, into the above granted premises to reenter and hold the same as if this Grant had never passed. Given at my Office in the County of Fairfax Within my said proprietary under my hand [and] seal. Dated this third Day of March in the twenty seventh year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the second by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith A. D. one thousand seven hundred and Fifty three.

      Fairfax

      (5) Northern Neck Grants Book H, p. 302:

      Fairfax Deed Dated 26 April 1753 to William Frost [Sr.] for 239 Acres of Land in Frederick County, VA:

      The Right Honourable Thomas Lord Fairfax Baron of Cameron in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland & Proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia; To all to Whom this present Writing shall come, sends greeting Know ye that for good Causes for and in Consideration of the Composition to me paid and for the Annual Rent hereafter Reserved; I have given granted and Confirmed & by these presents for me my heirs and Assigns do give grant and Confirm unto William Frost of Frederick County a Certain Tract of Waste and ungranted Land, in the said County and on the Et. side of Back Creek which he purchased of Joseph Botchum and bounded as by a Survey thereof made by Mr. John Mauzy as followeth. Beginning at a Corner Ash on the Et. side of the said Creek, thence So. 66° Et. seventy Eight Poles to Two Corner Pines on the side of [a] hill Thence No. 2° Et. three hundred and seven poles to a hickory; thence No. 66° Wt. Eighty two Poles to a spanish [sic] Oak, by the said Creek, thence up its Several Courses to the Beginning. Containing two hundred thirty Nine Acres. Together With all Rights Members and Appurtenances thereunto belonging Royal Mines excepted and a full Third part of all Lead, Copper, Tin, Coals, Iron mines and Iron Ore that shall be found thereon: To have and hold the said two hundred thirty nine Acres of Land together With all Rights profits and benefits to the same belonging or in any Wise appertaining. Except before Excepted, to him the said William Frost his heirs and Assigns for ever. He the said William Frost his heirs & assigns therefore yielding and paying to me my heirs & assigns, or to my Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic], Agent or Agents or to the Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] Agent or Agents of my heirs & assigns Proprietors of the said Northern Neck, Yearly and Every year on the feast day of St. Michael the Archangel the fee Rent of one shilling sterling for every fifty Acres of Land hereby granted and so proportionably for a greater or lesser Quantity: Provided that if the said William Frost, his heirs or assigns shall not pay the before Reserved Annual Rent so that the same or any part thereof shall be behind or unpaid by the Space of two Whole years after the same shall become due if Lawfully Demanded That then it shall and may be lawful for me my heirs or assigns Proprietors as aforesaid, my or their Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic], Agent or Agents, into the above granted premises to reenter and hold the same as if this grant had never Passed. Given at my Office in Fairfax County within my said Proprietary under my hand and seal. Dated this twenty sixth day of April in the twenty _____ year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the second by the grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King & Defender of the Faith A. D. one thousand seven hundred and fifty three.

      Fairfax

      (6) Northern Neck Grants Book H, p. 640:

      Fairfax Deed Dated 15 June 1755 to William Frost [Sr.] for 239 Acres of Land in Frederick County, VA:

      The Right Honourable Thomas Lord Fairfax Baron of Cameron in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland Proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia To all To whom this present Writing shall come sends Greeting Know ye That for good Causes for and in Consideration of the Composition to me paid and for the annual Rent hereafter reserved I have given granted and confirmed and by these Presents for me my Heirs & Assigns do give grant and confirm unto William Frost a Certain Tract of Waste and ungranted Land in the County of Frederick on the East Side of Back Creek which he purchased of Joseph Botchum and bounded as by a Survey thereof made by Mr. John Mauzy as followeth: Beginning at a Corner Ash on the East Side of the said Creek Thence So. 66° Et. Seventy eight Poles to two Corner Pines on the Side of a Hill Thence No. 2° Et. three hundred and seven Poles to a Hiccory [sic] thence No. 66° Wt. eighty two Poles to a Spanish Oak by the said Creek thence up it's [sic] several Courses to the Beginning Containing two hundred & thirty nine Acres together with all Rights Members and Appurtenances thereunto belonging Royal Mines excepted and a full third Part of all Lead Copper Tin Coals Iron Mine and Iron Ore that shall be found thereon to have and to hold the said two hundred and thirty Nine Acres of Land together with all Rights Profits and Benefits to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining except before excepted to him the said William Frost his Heirs and Assigns forever; he the said William Frost his Heirs and Assigns therefore yielding and paying to me my Heirs or Assigns or to my certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] Agent or Agents or to the certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] of my Heirs or Assigns Proprietors of the said Northern Neck Yearly and every Year on The Feast Day of St. Michael the Archangel the Fee Rent of one Shilling Sterling Money for every Fifty Acres of Land hereby granted and so proportionably for a greater or lesser Quantity; Provided that if the said William Frost his Heirs or Assigns shall not pay the before reserved annual Rent as aforesaid so that the same or any Part thereof shall be behind or unpaid by the Space of two whole Years after the same shall become due if lawfully demanded that then it shall and may be lawful for me my Heirs or Assigns Proprietors as aforesaid my or their certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] Agent or Agents into the above granted Premises to reenter and hold the same as if this Grant had never passed Given at my Office in the County of Fairfax within my said Proprietary under my Hand and Seal. Dated this 15th Day of June on the twenty eighth Year of the Reign of his Majesty King George the Second Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and fifty five.

      Fairfax

      (7) Clark, Murtie June, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 1732-1774, Baltimore, MD: 1983, pp. 328-332:

      POLL FOR FREDERICK COUNTY, Dec 11, 1755, LIST OF VOTERS . . .

      Frost, William . . .

      FOR MR. HUGH WEST: . . .

      Frost, William . . .

      FOR COLO: GEO: WASHINGTON: . . .

      FOR CAPT. THOMAS SWEARENGEN: . . .

      For:

      Colo George Washington - 40
      Capt Thomas Swearengen - 270
      Mr. Hugh West - 271

      Id. at pp. 513-519:

      Poll taken in Frederick County, Jul 24, 1758 [Alphabetical List]

      Colonel [George] Washington: . . .

      Frost, Will:m . . .

      Total 309

      Colonel F. B. Martin: . . .

      Total 239

      Mr. Hugh West: . . .

      Frost, Will:m . . .

      Total 199

      Captain Thomas Swearington: . . .

      Total 45

      [It appears that Will:m Frost voted twice in this poll.]

      Id. at pp. 546-556:

      Poll taken at the Election of Burgesses, Frederick County, May 18, 1761

      COLONEL GEO: WASHINGTON: . . .

      Frost, William . . .

      COLONEL GEORGE MERCER: . . .

      Frost, Will:m . . .

      The following is the number of the poll taken at the election of Burgesses for Frederick County, 18 May 1761:

      Colonel Geo: Washington - 505
      Colonel Geo: Mercer - 399
      Colonel Adam Stephen - 294
      Robert Rutherford - 1
      Colonel John Hite - 1
      Henry Brinker - 1

      Signed by Tho:s Wood, Poll taker

      [It appears that William/Will:m Frost voted twice in this poll.]

      (8) Jantz, Virginia Copeland, Copeland, Bostick, Patton, and Allied Families, Waco, TX: privately published, 1981, p. 12:

      By 1756 John and Mary Frost had moved to South Carolina with other Quaker families. They may have moved there at an earlier date, but John Frost's first grant was surveyed on 8 December, 1756, and was located on the Wateree River. It contained 65 acres. A William Frost, who may have been a brother to John Frost, also obtained a grant in this area on 2 April, 1752.

      [See also Note (9), below.]

      (9) On 22 January 1759, William FROST, Sr. obtained a land grant 200 acres on the Wateree River in SC. (See http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives, Series: S213019, Vol. 0009, Page 00012, Item: 000, Record 3 of 25 records.) In 1762, Willliam FROST, Sr. and his wife executed deed of lease and release of this land to Abraham ODAM. (See http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives, Series: S372001, Vol. 02Y0, Page 00562, Item: 000, Record 6 of 25 records.)

      (10) Deeds of Lease and Release Dated July 9, 1756 and July 10, 1756, respectively, from John Cazine and Deborah Cazine, husband and wife, to William Frost, Sr., Frederick County, VA Deed Book 4, pp. 138-141:

      Lease:

      This Indenture Made the ninth Day of July in the year of our Lord one Thousand seven hundred and fifty six Between John Cazine of Frederick County in the Colony of Virginia and Deborah his wife of the one part and William Frost of the County aforesaid yeoman of the other part Witnesseth that the said John Cazine for and in Consideration of the Sum of Five Shillings Current money of Virginia to him in hand paid by the said William Frost at or before the Sealing and Delivery of these presents the Receipt Whereof is hereby acknowledged Hath Granted Bargained and Sold and by these Presents Doth Grant Bargain and Sell unto the said William Frost a Certain Tract of Land Containing Four hundred and Fifty five acres be the Same More or Less Lying Scituate [sic] and being in the aforesaid County of Frederick County Granted by Patent to the said John Cazine bearing Date the twenty Fifth Day of October in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and Fifty one Surveyed by Mr. George Washington and adjoining the Land of Colonel George Wm. Fairfax Beginning at a Hickory and Red Oak marked FX Corner of the said Colonel Fairfax's Land and Extending thence with his Line South 30 Degrees west two hundred and twenty poles to two Red Oaks in his line thence South Sixty Degrees East one hundred Eighty two poles to a Hickory on a Levill [sic] thence north 30 degrees East Three hundred and Ten poles to George Smiths Line about Eighty poles from his Corner Thence with his line north Forty five Degrees West two hundred and Ten poles to a White Oak in Thomas Loftin's line thence with his line South Seven Degrees west twenty poles to three Small Locusts by a Path thence north 83 Degrees west one hundred twenty Eight poles to two Red Oaks his Corner in Colonel Fairfax's Line thence with his lines South Seven Degrees west ninety poles to a Large White Oak markd FX thence South 60 Degrees East ninety poles to the Beginning and all Houses Buildings orchards ways waters water Courses Profits Commodities Hereditaments and Appurtenances whatsoever to the said Premises hereby granted or any part thereof belonging or in any wise appurtaining [sic] and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder or Remainders Rents Issues and Profits thereof To Have & to Hold the said Tract of Land and all and singular other the Premises hereby granted with the Appurtenances unto the said William Frost his Executors Administrators and Assigns from the Day before the Date hereof and During the Full Term and Time of one Whole Year from thence next to be fully Compleat and Ended yielding & paying therefore [sic] the Rent of one Ear of Indian Corn on Lady Day next if the same shall be lawfully Demanded To the Intent and purpose that by virtue of these presents and of the Statue for Transferring uses into Possession the said William Frost may be in Actual Possession of the Premises and be thereby Enabled to accept and Take a grant and Release of the Reversion and Inheritance thereof to him and his heirs In Witness whereof the said John Cazine and Deborah his wife have hereunto Set their hands and Seals the Day and year first above written.

      John Cazine [His Mark] [Seal]
      Deborah Cazine [Her Mark] [Seal]

      Sealed & Delivered in Presence of

      Thos Speake
      William Jolliffe
      Hugh Hartley

      At a Court held for Frederick County on Thursday the 3d Day of August 1756 This Lease for Land from John Cazine to William Frost was proved in Open Court by the oaths of Thomas Speake William Jolliffe and Hugh Hartley which on the motion of the said William are Admitted to Record

      Teste

      J. Wood C. C.

      Release:

      This Indenture made the Tenth Day of July in the year of our Lord one Thousand seven hundred and Fifty six Between John Cazine of Frederick County in the Colony of Virginia & Deborah his wife of the one part and William Frost of the County aforesaid yeoman of the other part Witnesseth that for and in Consideration of the Sum of Sixty pounds Current money of Virginia to the John Cazine in hand paid by the said William Frost at or before the Sealing and Delivery of these presents the Receipt Whereof he Doth hereby Acknowledge and Doth hereof Release & Discharge the said William Frost his Executors and Administrators by these presents he the said John Cazine and Deborah his wife have Granted Bargained and Sold Aliened Released and Confirmed and by these Presents Do Grant Bargain Sell Alien Release and Confirm unto the said William Frost a Certain Tract of Land Containing Four hundred and Fifty five acres be the Same More or Less Lying Scituate [sic] and being in the aforesaid County of Frederick County Granted by patent to the said John Cazine bearing Date the 25th Day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and Fifty one Surveyed by Mr. George Washington and adjoining the Land of Colonel George William Fairfax Beginning at a Hickory and Red Oak marked FX Corner of the said Colonel Fairfax's Land and Extending thence with his Line South 30 Degrees west two hundred and Twenty poles to two Red Oaks in his Line thence South Sixty Degrees west one hundred and Eighty two poles to a Hickory on a Levill [sic] thence north thirty Degrees East three hundred and ten poles to a White Oak in Thomas Loftin's Line thence with his line South Seven Degrees west twenty poles to three Small Locusts by a Path thence north Eighty three Degrees west One hundred twenty Eight poles to two Red Oaks his Corner in Colonel Fairfax's Line thence with his line South Seven Degrees West ninety poles to a large white Oak Marked FX thence South Sixty Degrees East ninety poles to the Beginning & all houses Buildings ways waters Water Courses profits Commodities Hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever to the said premises hereby Granted or any part thereof belonging or in any wise appurtaining [sic] and the Reversion or Reversions Remainder and Remainders Rents Issues and Profits thereof and also all the Estate, Right Title Interest Use Trust property Claim and Demand whatsoever of him the said John Cazine and Deborah his wife of in and to the said Premises and all Deeds Evidences and writings Touching or in any wise Concerning the Same To Have & To Hold the said Four hundred and Fifty five acres of land and all and singular other the Premises hereby granted and Bargained and Every part and Parcell [sic] thereof with their and every of their Appurtenances unto the said William Frost his heirs and assigns forever to the only proper use and behoof of him the said William Frost and of his heirs and assigns forever and the said John Cazine for himself his heirs Exrs. & Admrs. Doth covenant promise and Grant to and with the said William Frost his heirs and assigns by these presents that he the said John Cazine now at the Time of Sealing and Delivery of these presents is Siesed [sic] of a good Sure Perfect and Indefeasible Estate of Inheritance in Fee Simple of and in the premises hereby Granted and Bargained & that he hath good power and Lawfull [sic] and Absolute Authority to Grant and Convey the Same to the said William Frost in manner and Form aforesaid and that the Said Premises Now are and so forever hereafter shall Remain and be free and Clear of and from all former and other Gifts Grants Bargains Sales Dower Right and Title of Dower Judgment Executions Titles Troubles Charges and Incumbrances [sic] whatsoever made Done Committed or Suffered by the said John Cazine or any other person or persons whatsoever (the Quit Rent hereafter to Grow Due and Payable to the Chief Lord or Lords of the Fee their heirs and Successors for and in Respect of the said premises only Excepted and Foreprizes) and Lastly that the said John Cazine and his heirs all and Singular the premises hereby Granted and Bargained with their appurtenances unto the said William Frost his heirs and assigns against him the sd John Cazine and his heirs and all and Every other person & persons Shall and will warrant and forever Defend by these Presents In Witness whereof the sd John Cazine and Deborah his wife have hereunto set their hands & seals the Day & year first above Written

      John Cazine [His Mark] [Seal]
      Deborah Cazine [Her Mark] [Seal]

      Sealed & Delivered In presence of

      Thos Speake
      Hugh Hartley
      William Jolliffe

      July 19th 1756

      Then Received of William Frost the Sum of Sixty pounds in Full of the Consideration money within mentioned for the Land and Premises hereby Conveyed I Say Recd. [Illegible]

      John Cazine [His Mark]

      At a Court held for Frederick County on Tuesday the 3d Day of August 1756 This Release for Land with a Receit [sic] Endorsed from John Cazine and Deborah his wife to William Frost were proved in open Court by the oaths of Thomas Speake William Jolliffe and Hugh Hartley which on the motion of the said William are Admitted to Record

      Teste

      J. Wood C. C.

      (11) http://www.rootsweb.com/~scnewber/text/misc/crumleyjohnfamilyfile.htm:

      William FROST was one of the witnesses to the will dated June 17, 1757 of James CRUMLEY. [According to O'Dell, Cecil, Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia, Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing Company, 1995, p. 180, the will was dated June 27, 1757 and proved August 9, 1764.]

      (12) Northern Neck Grants Book N, p. 256:

      Fairfax Deed Dated 3 October 1766 to William Frost [Sr.] for 114 Acres of Land in Frederick County, VA:

      The Right Honourable Thomas Lord Fairfax Baron of Cameron in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland Proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia To all To whom this present Writing shall come sends Greeting Know ye That for good Causes for and in Consideration of the Composition to me paid and for the annual Rent hereinafter reserved I have given granted and confirmed and by these Presents for me my Heirs & Assigns do give grant and confirm unto William Frost of Frederick County A Certain Tract of Waste and ungranted Land on the So. Et. Side of Back Creek in The said County And bounded as by a Survey thereof made by John Mauzy Beginning At an Ash by the said Creek the Beginning Tree of his 239 Acres Thence up the Courses of the said Creek So. 27 Et. Forty Poles So. 47 Et. Twenty Poles to another Ash at the Mouth of a Branch Thence No. 77 Et. Eight two Poles to two young White Oaks on a Hill Thence No. 2 Et. Ninety four Poles to a White Oak by a Valley Thence No. 88 Et. Forty Poles to a Pine and White Oak Sapling Thence No. 2 Et. One Hundred and forty nine Poles to three White Oaks in a Valley Thence No. 88 Wt. Sixty Poles to three Spanish Oaks in Philip Dorset's Line Thence with it So. 30 Wt. Six Poles to two White Oaks on a Hill Thence with another of his Lines of his 239 Acres Thence along his Lines So. 27 Et. Two Hundred and fifty Poles to two Pines on a Hill Side Thence No. 60 Wt. Seventy eight Poles to the Beginning Containing One Hundred and fourteen Acres Together With all Rights Members and Appurtenances thereunto belonging Royal Mines excepted And a full Third Part of all Lead Copper Tin Coals Iron Mine and Iron Ore that shall be found thereon To have and to hold The said One Hundred and fourteen Acres of Land together with all Rights Profits and Benefits to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining Except before excepted To him The said William Frost his Heirs and Assigns Forever He The said William Frost his Heirs and Assigns therefore Yielding and Paying to me my Heirs or Assigns or to my Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] Agent or Agents or to the Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] of my Heirs or Assigns Proprietors of the said Northern Neck Yearly and every Year on The Feast Day of St. Michael the Archangel The Fee Rent of One Shilling Sterling Money for every Fifty Acres of Land hereby granted and so proportionably for a greater or lesser Quantity Provided That if the said William Frost his Heirs and Assigns shall not pay the said reserved annual Rent as aforesaid so that the same or any Part thereof shall be behind and unpaid by the Space of two whole Years after the same shall become due If legally demanded That then it shall and may be lawful for me my Heirs or Assigns Proprietors as aforesaid my or their Certain Attorney or Attornies [sic] Agent or Agents into the above granted Premises to reenter and hold the same as if this Grant had never passed Given At my Office in the County of Frederick under my Hand and Seal Dated the 3d Day of October AD 1766.

      Fairfax

      (13) Last Will and Testament of William Frost, Sr., executed on August 21, 1774 in Frederick County, VA, proved on May 7, 1776 in Frederick County, VA [Frederick County, VA Will Book 4, pp. 323-324]:

      Whereas I William Frost of the County of Frederick & Colony of Virginia being in poor state of health but in my proper senses and Considering the uncertainty of Life do think fit to make this my Last Will & Testament and by these Presents do make and ordain this my last will & Testament in manner and form Folowing [sic] that is to say First of all it is my will that my Executors hereinafter named do pay all my Just debts and Funeral Charges as soon as possible out of my personal estate, Secondly I give and bequeath unto my Son William Frost his heirs and assigns forever two Tracts of Land laying [sic] and being in the County of Frederick & Colony of Virginia on the South East and East side of Back Creek Containing three hundred and fifty three acres agreeable to two deeds from under the hand and Seal of the Right Hons. Thos. Lord Fairfax bearing date the Twenty sixth day of April one Thousand seven hundred and Fifty three & and third day of October one Thousand seven hundred & sixty six, Charging the said William Frost Junr. with a Legacy to be paid to his Sister Francis [sic] in two years after my deceas [sic] the sum of Fifty pounds Current money of Virginia & in the case the said Francis [sic] should die before the said Legacy hereby allowed is due & payable then and in that case it my Will that my said Son William Frost shall be free and Clear of paying of such Legacy Thirdly I give and Bequeath to my two sons John & Thomas Frost their Heirs and assigns for ever a Certain Tract or parcel of Land laying [sic] in the County of Frederick & Colony aforesaid Containing Four Hundred acres as will appear by Deed &c. from the proprietor of the Northern neck, Virginia a bearing date the 17th day November 1752 the same to be Equally divided Quantity & Quality agreeable to the discretion of my Executors. Fourthly I give & bequeath unto my two sons Isaac & Abraham Frost & their Heirs and Assigns forever a Certain Tract of Land Laying [sic] and being in the County of Frederick & Colony aforesaid Containing four Hundred acres as by Deed &c. bearing date the fourth day March one thousand Seven Hundred and Fifty three Fifthly I give & Bequeath unto Jacob and Amos Frost whereon I now Live the Plantation & Tract of Land Containing Four Hundred & Fifty Five acres as also one other Tract which I have obtained a Bond for under the Hand & Seal of Warner Washington, Senr. & Warner Washington Junr. under the Penalty of one Hundred & Sixty Pounds to convey the sd. Tract of Land Containing sixty one acres agreeable to the said Bond bearing Date the 14th April 1774. Sixthly I give & Bequeath unto my Dear and beloved Wife Hannah Frost all the Profits of the last two mentioned Tracts of Land during her natural life for the support of herself & bringing up the small Children & duly Educating of them And Seventhly I do hereby nominate & appoint my trusty & Loving sons William John & Thomas Frost my whole & sole Executors of this my last Will & Testament hereby disannulling all former Wills by me made. Eighthly I do hereby order and it is my Will that Jacob & Amos Frost do pay (after they are in Possession of the Lands bequeathed to them) unto Abraham Frost the sum of Fifty pounds at or upon two years after the said Possession and I do hereby order my Executors to pay unto my Daughters Mary and Hannah the wives of Jacob Larew & John Mason Five pounds each out of my Personal Estate and the Remainder of my Personal Estate after my Funeral Charges & Just Debts are Paid & Legacies paid I do hereby order my Executors before mentioned to equally Divide the Remainder between my loving wife & Elizabeth Martha & Ellen & Ann Frost my Daughters.

      William Frost (LS)

      Signed Seal'd & Publis'd &
      Declared as his last Will &
      Testament in the Presence of

      Joseph Day
      Nathan Littler
      John Adams
      William Drago (his mark)

      At a Court held for Frederick County the 17th day of May 1776 This Last Will and Testament of William Frost dec was proved by the affirmation of Nathan Littler and John Adams (being two of the people called Quakers) witnesses thereto and ordered to be Recorded and on the motion of William John & Thomas Frost the Executors therin named who made oath according to the Certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form, they with Security having entered into and acknowledged bond Conditions as the Law directs.

      By the Court

      J. A. Keith C. of Court

      (14) Chalkley, Lyman, The Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia: 1745 to 1800 [Reprint, Originally Published, 1912], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1980 <http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~chalkley/>, Vol. II, pp. 133-134:

      Frost vs. Frost's Administrator - O. S. 162; N. S. 57 - Orator, Abraham Frost of Frederick County, son of William Frost, Sr., who died testate in Frederick, devising land to Abraham and his brother Isaac. Isaac died 1774 intestate, leaving (beside orator) two other brothers, viz: Thomas and William. In 1795 William had a nephew, Isaac McCormick. William died in 1800, testate. Isaac Frost died before his father, who died 1775. John Frost, another devisee of Wm. Sr., died 1777. Answer by Mitcham C. Repass and Frances, his wife, a child and devisee of William Frost, deceased, Jr. Thomas Frost deposes at tavern of Griffith Yeatman's in Cincinnati, May, 1803, aged 58 years; son of William Frost, Sr., who died 1775 (his will dated 25th August, 1774). John Frost died 1777. Sigismund Stribbling, aged 63, deposes in Winchester, 5th June, 1810. Isaac Frost was out with deponent in Dunmore's Expedition in 1774, and died in fall of that year coming in home. William Frost was with him. John Lindsey, aged 64, deposed ditto. Andrew McCormick, aged 63 or 64, deposed ditto. Jacob Larue and George Rust live in Kentucky in 1807. William Frost's will of Frederick County: Daughter, Frances Hickman, sometimes called Frances Frost; tract conveyed to William by Martin Baker and Elizabeth, his wife, of Hanover County, by deed, 17th September, 1781. Frances is a base-born child, begotten by William on Elizabeth Hickman, widow of Isaac Hickman, Elizabeth being now the wife of Capt. Peter Rust of Frederick; nephew, Isaac McCormick, son of Francis McCormick, dated 16th June, 1797; proved June (May), 1801, in Frederick. William Frost of Frederick, will: Sons, William, John, Thomas, Isaac, Abraham; daughters, Frances, Elizabeth, Martha, Ellen, Anna. Devisees Jacob and Amos Frost: Wife, Hannah; daughters, Mary (wife of Jacob Larew), and Hannah, wife of John Mason. Dated 25th August, 1774; recorded 7th May, 1776. Deed by Benj. Berry and Thomas McCormick and Anne, his wife, to Robert Dunlap, recorded in Winchester District Court. 398 acres included in a patent 17th November, 1752, by Fairfax to Wm. Frost. Deed 24th February, 1795, by Thomas Frost and William Frost and Elizabeth Frost, wife of Thomas, to Benj. Berry and Thos. McCormick. Recorded in Berkeley County, 24th February, 1795.

      [Note by compiler: Chalkley is not without its problems, as Daphne Gentry of the Publications and Educational Division of the Library of Virginia has pointed out. (See http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/local/va5_chalkleys.htm.) Not all documents are included. There are not only errors of omission, but errors of transcription have also been documented. This simply means that the careful researcher should send for a copy of the original document, as with any secondary source, and should not assume that because it doesn't appear in Chalkley it does not exist.]

      (15) Black's Law Dictionary, 4th ed., St. Paul, MN: 1951, p. 1246:

      The plaintiff in a cause or matter in chancery, when addressing or petitioning the court, used to style himself "orator," and, when, a woman, "oratrix." But these terms have long gone into disuse, and the customary phrases now are "plaintiff" or "petitioner."

      (16) The compiler (a descendant of William FROST, Sr.) has had his Y-DNA tested for the FROST DNA Project. The results of that test are posted at http://frostdnaproject.home.comcast.net/index_files/Page450.htm, where the compiler is listed as a member of FROST Family Group 5, alias 88079. The test results identify the compiler, and, therefore, William FROST, Sr., as a member of haplogroup R1b1c, which is a subgroup of haplogroup R1b.

      The compiler has been provided the following information regarding haplogroup R1b by The Genographic Project <http://www.genographic.com>:

      Your Y-chromosome results identify you as a member of haplogroup R1b.

      The genetic markers that define your ancestral history reach back roughly 60,000 years to the first common marker of all non-African men, M168, and follow your lineage to present day, ending with M343, the defining marker of haplogroup Rib.

      If you look at the map highlighting your ancestors' route, you will see that members of haplogroup Rib carry the following Y-chromosome markers:

      M168 > M89 > M9 > M45 > M207 > M173 > M343

      Today, roughly 70 percent of the men in southern England belong to haplogroup R1b. In parts of Spain and Ireland, that number exceeds 90 percent.

      What's a haplogroup, and why do geneticists concentrate on the Y chromosome in their search for markers? For that matter, what's a marker?

      Each of us carries DNA that is a combination of genes passed from both our mother and father, giving us traits that range from eye color and height to athleticism and disease susceptibility. One exception is the Y chromosome, which is passed directly from father to son, unchanged, from generation to generation.

      Unchanged, that is unless a mutation a random, naturally occurring, usually harmless change occurs. The mutation, known as a marker, acts as a beacon; it can be mapped through generations because it will be passed down from the man in whom it occurred to his sons, their sons, and every male in his family for thousands of years.

      In some instances there may be more than one mutational event that defines a particular branch on the tree. This means that any of these markers can be used to determine your particular haplogroup, since every individual who has one of these markers also has the others.

      When geneticists identify such a marker, they try to figure out when it first occurred, and in which geographic region of the world. Each marker is essentially the beginning of a new lineage on the family tree of the human race. Tracking the lineages provides a picture of how small tribes of modern humans in Africa tens of thousands of years ago diversified and spread to populate the world.

      A haplogroup is defined by a series of markers that are shared by other men who carry the same random mutations. The markers trace the path your ancestors took as they moved out of Africa. It's difficult to know how many men worldwide belong to any particular haplogroup, or even how many haplogroups there are, because scientists simply don't have enough data yet.

      One of the goals of the five-year Genographic Project is to build a large enough database of anthropological genetic data to answer some of these questions. To achieve this, project team members are traveling to all corners of the world to collect more than 100,000 DNA samples from indigenous populations. . . .

      Your Ancestral Journey: What We Know Now

      M168: Your Earliest Ancestor

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: Roughly 50,000 years ago

      Place of Origin: Africa

      Climate: Temporary retreat of Ice Age; Africa moves from drought to warmer temperatures and moister conditions

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: Approximately 10,000

      Toots and Skills: Stone tools; earliest evidence of art and advanced conceptual skills

      Skeletal and archaeological evidence suggest that anatomically modern humans evolved in Africa around 200,000 years ago, and began moving out of Africa to colonize the rest of the world around 60,000 years ago.

      The man who gave rise to the first genetic marker in your lineage probably lived in northeast Africa in the region of the Rift Valley, perhaps in present-day Ethiopia, Kenya, or Tanzania, some 31,000 to 79,000 years ago. Scientists put the most likely date for when he lived at around 50,000 years ago. His descendants became the only lineage to survive outside of Africa, making him the common ancestor of every non-African man living today.

      But why would man have first ventured out of the familiar African hunting grounds and into unexplored lands? It is likely that a fluctuation in climate may have provided the impetus for your ancestors' exodus out of Africa.

      The African ice age was characterized by drought rather than by cold. It was around 50,000 years ago that the ice sheets of northern Europe began to melt, introducing a period of warmer temperatures and moister climate in Africa. Parts of the inhospitable Sahara briefly became habitable. As the drought-ridden desert changed to a savanna, the animals hunted by your ancestors expanded their range and began moving through the newly emerging green corridor of grasslands. Your nomadic ancestors followed the good weather and the animals they hunted, although the exact route they followed remains to be determined.

      In addition to a favorable change in climate, around this same time there was a great leap forward in modern humans' intellectual capacity. Many scientists believe that the emergence of language gave us a huge advantage over other early human species. Improved tools and weapons, the ability to plan ahead and cooperate with one another, and an increased capacity to exploit resources in ways we hadn't been able to earlier, all allowed modern humans to rapidly migrate to new territories, exploit new resources, and replace other hominids.

      M89: Moving Through the Middle East

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: 45,000 years ago

      Place: Northern Africa or the Middle East

      Climate: Middle East: Semiarid grass plains

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: Tens of thousands

      Tools and Skills: Stone, ivory, wood tools

      The next male ancestor in your ancestral lineage is the man who gave rise to M89, a marker found in 90 to 95 percent of all non-Africans. This man was born around 45,000 years ago in northern Africa or the Middle East.

      The first people to leave Africa likely followed a coastal route that eventually ended in Australia. Your ancestors followed the expanding grasslands and plentiful game to the Middle East and beyond, and were part of the second great wave of migration out of Africa.

      Beginning about 40,000 years ago, the climate shifted once again and became colder and more arid. Drought hit Africa and the grasslands reverted to desert, and for the next 20,000 years, the Saharan Gateway was effectively closed. With the desert impassable, your ancestors had two options: remain in the Middle East, or move on. Retreat back to the home continent was not an option.

      While many of the descendants of M89 remained in the Middle East, others continued to follow the great herds of buffalo, antelope, woolly mammoths, and other game through what is now modern-day Iran to the vast steppes of Central Asia.

      These semiarid grass-covered plains formed an ancient "superhighway" stretching from eastern France to Korea. Your ancestors, having migrated north out of Africa into the Middle East, then traveled both east and west along this Central Asian superhighway. A smaller group continued moving north from the Middle East to Anatolia and the Balkans, trading familiar grasslands for forests and high country.

      M9: The Eurasian Clan Spreads Wide and Far

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: 40,000 years ago

      Place: Iran or southern Central Asia

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: Tens of thousands

      Tools and Skills: Upper Paleolithic

      Your next ancestor, a man born around 40,000 years ago in Iran or southern Central Asia, gave rise to a genetic marker known as M9, which marked a new lineage diverging from the 1489 Middle Eastern Clan. His descendants, of which you are one, spent the next 30,000 years populating much of the planet.

      This large lineage, known as the Eurasian Clan, dispersed gradually over thousands of years. Seasoned hunters followed the herds ever eastward, along the vast super highway of Eurasian steppe. Eventually their path was blocked by the massive mountain ranges of south Central Asia the Hindu Kush, the Tian Shan, and the Himalayas.

      The three mountain ranges meet in a region known as the "Pamir Knot," located in present-day Tajikistan. Here the tribes of hunters split into two groups. Some moved north into Central Asia, others moved south into what is now Pakistan and the Indian subcontinent.

      These different migration routes through the Pamir Knot region gave rise to separate lineages.

      Most people native to the Northern Hemisphere trace their roots to the Eurasian Clan. Nearly all North Americans and East Asians are descended from the man described above, as are most Europeans and many Indians.

      M45: The Journey Through Central Asia

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: 35,000 [years ago]

      Place of Origin: Central Asia

      Climate: Glaciers expanding over much of Europe

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: Approximately 100,000

      Tools and Skills: Upper Paleolithic

      The next marker of your genetic heritage, M45, arose around 35,000 years ago, in a man born in Central Asia. He was part of the M9 Eurasian Clan that had moved to the north of the mountainous Hindu Kush and onto the game-rich steppes of present-day Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and southern Siberia.

      Although big game was plentiful, the environment on the Eurasian steppes became increasing hostile as the glaciers of the Ice Age began to expand once again. The reduction in rainfall may have induced desertlike conditions on the southern steppes, forcing your ancestors to follow the herds of game north.

      To exist in such harsh conditions, they learned to build portable animal-skin shelters and to create weaponry and hunting techniques that would prove successful against the much larger animals they encountered in the colder climates. They compensated for the lack of stone they traditionally used to make weapons by developing smaller points and blades microliths that could be mounted to bone or wood handles and used effectively. Their tool kit also included bone needles for sewing animal-skin clothing that would both keep them warm and allow them the range of movement needed to hunt the reindeer and mammoth that kept them fed.

      Your ancestors' resourcefulness and ability to adapt was critical to survival during the last ice age in Siberia, a region where no other hominid species is known to have lived.

      The M45 Central Asian Clan gave rise to many more; the man who was its source is the common ancestor of most Europeans and nearly all Native American men.

      M207: Leaving Central Asia

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: 30,000 [years ago]

      Place of Origin: Central Asia

      Climate: Glaciers expanding over much of Europe and western Eurasia

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: Approximately 100,000

      Tools and Skills: Upper Paleolithic

      After spending considerable time in Central Asia, refining skills to survive in harsh new conditions and exploit new resources, a group from the Central Asian Clan began to head west towards the European subcontinent.

      An individual in this clan carried the new M207 mutation on his Y chromosome. His descendants ultimately split into two distinct groups, with one continuing onto the European subcontinent, and the other group turning south and eventually making it as far as India.

      Your lineage falls within the first haplogroup, R1, and gave rise to the first modern humans to move into Europe and eventually colonize the continent.

      M173: Colonizing Europe The First Modern Europeans

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: Around 30,000 years ago

      Place: Central Asia

      Climate: Ice Age

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: Approximately 100,000

      Tools and Skills: Upper Paleolithic

      As your ancestors continued to move west, a man born around 30,000 years ago in Central Asia gave rise to a lineage defined by the genetic marker M173. His descendants were part of the first large wave of humans to reach Europe.

      During this period, the Eurasian steppelands extended from present-day Germany, and possibly France, to Korea and China. The climate fostered a land rich in resources and opened a window into Europe.

      Your ancestors' arrival in Europe heralded the end of the era of the Neandertals, a hominid species that inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia from about 29,000 to 230,000 years ago. Better communication skills, weapons, and resourcefulness probably enabled your ancestors to outcompete Neandertals for scarce resources.

      This wave of migration into Western Europe marked the appearance and spread of what archaeologists call the Aurignacian culture. The culture is distinguished by significant innovations in methods of manufacturing tools, more standardization of tools, and a broader set of tool types, such as end-scrapers for preparing animal skins and tools for woodworking.

      In addition to stone, the first modern humans to reach Europe used bone, ivory, antler, and shells as part of their tool kit. Bracelets and pendants made of shells, teeth, ivory, and carved bone appear at many sites. Jewelry, often an indication of status, suggests a more complex social organization was beginning to develop.

      The large number of archaeological sites found in Europe from around 30,000 years ago indicates that there was an increase in population size.

      Around 20,000 years ago, the climate window shut again, and expanding ice sheets forced your ancestors to move south to Spain, Italy, and the Balkans. As the ice retreated and temperatures became warmer, beginning about 12,000 years ago, many descendants of M173 moved north again to repopulate places that had become inhospitable during the Ice Age.

      Not surprisingly, today the number of descendants of the man who gave rise to marker M173 remains very high in Western Europe. It is particularly concentrated in northern France and the British Isles where it was carried by ancestors who had weathered the Ice Age in Spain.

      M343: Direct Descendants of Cro-Magnon

      Fast Facts

      Time of Emergence: Around 30,000 years ago

      Place of Origin: Western Europe

      Climate: Ice sheets continuing to creep down Northern Europe

      Estimated Number of Homo sapiens: [not provided]

      Tools and Skills: Upper Paleolithic

      Around 30,000 years ago, a descendant of the clan making its way into Europe gave rise to marker M343, the defining marker of your haplogroup. You are a direct descendent of the people who dominated the human expansion into Europe, the Cro-Magnon.

      The Cro-Magnon are responsible for the famous cave paintings found in southern France. These spectacular paintings provide archaeological evidence that there was a sudden blossoming of artistic skills as your ancestors moved into Europe. Prior to this, artistic endeavors were mostly comprised of jewelry made of shell, bone, and ivory; primitive musical instruments; and stone carvings.

      The cave paintings of the Cro-Magnon depict animals like bison, deer, rhinoceroses, and horses, and natural events important to Paleolithic life such as spring molting, hunting, and pregnancy. The paintings are far more intricate, detailed, and colorful than anything seen prior to this period.

      Your ancestors knew how to make woven clothing using the natural fibers of plants, and had relatively advanced tools of stone, bone, and ivory. Their jewelry, carvings, and intricate, colorful cave paintings bear witness to the Cro-Magnons' advanced culture during the last glacial age.

      This is where your genetic trail, as we know it today, ends. . . . As additional data are collected and analyzed, more will be learned about your place in the history of the men and women who first populated the Earth.
    Person ID I91  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 21 Nov 2014 

    Father John FROST,   b. Abt 1690,   d. Bef 02 Sep 1766, SC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 76 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Sarah (FROST) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Family ID F822  Group Sheet

    Family Hannah (FROST),   b. Between 1712 and 1714,   d. Frederick [now Clarke] County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1738 
    Children 
     1. Elizabeth FROST,   b. Abt 1755, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1822, Butler County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years)
     2. Jacob FROST,   b. Abt 1753, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 11 Oct 1804, Newberry County, SC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 51 years)
     3. Hannah FROST,   b. 23 Dec 1751, Berkeley County, VA [now WV] Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Mar 1811, Fayette County, PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
     4. Martha FROST,   b. 25 Jan 1759, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1832, Range Township, Madison County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     5. Amos FROST,   b. Abt 1766, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Dec 1819, Frederick [now Clarke] County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 53 years)
     6. Ann FROST,   b. 18 Aug 1763, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1815  (Age 51 years)
     7. Ellen FROST,   b. Abt 1761, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 21 Aug 1774  (Age ~ 13 years)
     8. Thomas FROST,   b. Abt 1745, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1822, Hamilton County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years)
     9. Isaac FROST,   b. Abt 1744, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1774, Dunmore's Expedition Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years)
     10. William FROST, Jr.,   b. Abt 1743, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 Apr 1801, Frederick [now Clarke] County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 58 years)
     11. Frances FROST,   b. Abt 1746, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1785, "Lang Syne," Frederick [now Clarke] County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 39 years)
     12. Abraham FROST,   b. Abt 1749,   d. Bef 02 May 1815, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 66 years)
     13. John FROST,   b. Abt 1748,   d. 1777  (Age ~ 29 years)
     14. Mary FROST,   b. 15 Aug 1747, Frederick County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1804, Hodgenville, Hardin [now LaRue] County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
    Last Modified 21 Nov 2014 
    Family ID F757  Group Sheet