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Abner FROST

Male Bef 1696 - Bef 1777  (< 81 years)


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  • Name Abner FROST 
    Born Bef 16 Feb 1696  Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 16 Feb 1696  Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Will 3 Apr 1775  Elizabeth, Essex [now Union] County, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died Bef 2 Dec 1777  Essex [now Union] County, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Probate 14 Jan 1778  Newark, Essex County, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • (1) Jacobus, Donald Lines, History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Vol. II, Part 1, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, p. 351:

      Frost, Abner, s. of Joseph.

      Bapt. 16 Feb. 1695/6, living 1760; m. at Stratfield, 24 Sept. 1723, Rebecca Hall, dau. of Francis, b. 23 Nov. 1703.

      Of Stratfield, he conveyed 9 Mar. 1722/3, as one of the children of Elizabeth Hull, dau. of Richard Hubbell. Of Elizabeth, Essex County, N. J., he conveyed 18 Mar. 1730/1 one-third of the right in Fairfield commons of his gr. father Daniel Frost.

      Children, rec. Stratfield:

      [i] Jedediah, b. 7 May 1724.

      [ii] Eleazer, b. 24 Oct. 1725, d. 24 Jan. 1725/6.

      [iii] Naomi, b. 20 Nov. 1726.

      [iv] Margaret, m. (license 2 Apr. 1751) Stephen Salmon. [Note: His will, 1760, named wife Hannah, father Abner Frost, and children Abner and Hannah.]

      Others?

      (2) Abner FROST was one of the so-called "Elizabeth-Town Associates" of Elizabeth-Town, NJ. He is mentioned in the following article:

      Goodwin, Aaron, The Elizabeth-Town Associates: Signatures on the Original Answer, 1751, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, vol. 138, pp. 189-198 (2007):

      BACKGROUND

      - 12 March 1664. King Charles II granted to his brother James, Duke of York, all land between the Connecticut and Delaware Rivers as well as parts of Maine, Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard, and Long Island.

      - 2 April 1664. The Duke of York appointed Colonel Richard Nicolls as deputy governor of his territory in North America "to perform and execute all and every of the Powers, which are by the said Letters Patents granted unto me."

      - 23/24 June 1664. The Duke of York, by lease and release, transferred land now New Jersey to John, Lord Berkeley, and Sir George Carteret.

      - 7 September 1664. Peter Stuyvesant relinquished New Amsterdam, and Nicolls took over as governor of the Duke of York's propriety.

      - 26 September 1664. Six men from Jamaica, Long Island, petitioned Governor Nicolls for the right to purchase land west of Staten Island and New York harbor from the Indians.

      - 30 September 1664. Nicolls consented to the land purchase.

      - 28 October 1664. John Baily, Daniel Denton, and Luke Watson of Jamaica, Long Island, purchased approximately 500,000 acres from Staten Island natives Mattano, Manamowaone, and Cowescomen, an area focused around what would become Elizabeth-Town, Woodbridge, and Piscataway.

      - 24 November 1664. Believed to be the date of "ground-breaking" of Elizabeth-Town, based on the requirement in the Indian deed that payment be made one year from settlement. The Indians were paid 24 November 1665.

      - 1 December 1664. Nicolls confirmed and granted the land purchase. Included in the grant is the instruction to "pay yearly to his Highness, the Duke of York, or his assigns, a certain rent according to the customary rate of the country for new plantations" after a five-year rent-free settlement period.

      - August 1665. The ship Philip appeared at the entrance of what became Elizabeth-Town Creek. Captain Philip Carteret, a 26-year-old fourth cousin of George Carteret, and roughly thirty immigrants disembarked. Philip produced papers of accreditation from Nicolls and George Carteret instating him as governor of New Jersey on behalf of the Proprietors, while the settlers in turn presented the Indian deed and the Nicolls grant.

      - 8 September 1665. Associate John Baily deeded "all and every" of his lots or parts of land as well as his rights as an Associate to Philip Carteret.

      - 19 February 1666. At a town meeting of freeholders and inhabitants, it was agreed that the original settlement should consist of four-score families. Twenty more families could be added at the discretion of the townspeople.

      - 1670. Shortly before the first quitrents came due, Philip Carteret conveyed his Associate share to a servant without the consent of the other Associates. Some of the Associates tore down the fences that encompassed the servant's new land. When the quitrents came due, the settlers refused to pay the East Jersey Proprietors, claiming it would give Carteret rights to grant land away and endanger their own titles.

      - March 1672. A Court of Oyer and Terminer was convened to try the Associates who had destroyed the servant's fence. The judge and jury were chosen by Philip Carteret, and the Associates were found guilty and fined, although the fines were never actually imposed.

      - 1672. Philip Carteret was displaced as governor by Assembly at Elizabeth-Town. He returned to England to complain to George Carteret of his trouble with the settlers. George Carteret's son James replaced Philip. The Duke of York denied the validity of the Nicolls grants and declared the titles of the "insurgents" void.

      - 1674. After the English recapture of New York, King Charles II confirmed his grant to the Duke of York. George Carteret received a confirmation for East Jersey.

      - 1682. The Carterets sold East Jersey to William Penn and his partners. By this time, Governor Nicolls had chartered seven towns in the province.

      - 1684. A description of East Jersey's seven settled towns states that Elizabeth-Town covered approximately 10,000 acres, while outlying plantations covered about 30,000 acres.

      - 1693. In Fullerton v. Jones, a Proprietor sued an Associate for nonpayment of quitrents and trespassing. Between then and 1740, a number of similar individual lawsuits between the Proprietors and Associates were brought, with varied results, so no firm precedent was established. The Associates later referred to this long-standing pattern as "harassment."

      - 8 February 1739. King George II granted the petition by the inhabitants and freeholders that Elizabeth-Town "be a Free Town and Borough of itself."

      THE ELIZABETH-TOWN BILL IN CHANCERY

      - 1740. The Proprietors decided to sue the Elizabeth-Town Associates as a whole, seeking seven decades of delinquent quitrents or eviction. Leading the East Jersey Proprietors, lawyer and proprietor James Alexander managed the complaint and began the five-year task of writing his famously lengthy bill against the Associates.

      - Summer 1744. Reasonably concerned that Governor and Chancellor Lewis Morris, a proprietor sympathizer, would find against the Associates (no jury required), Associates Stephen Crane and Matthias Hetfield crossed the Atlantic with a petition to the Crown signed by more than three hundred Associates. Their petition, requesting that an appointed commission, rather than Morris, consider their case, failed to find support.

      - April 1745. Alexander completed and filed his long-awaited Elizabeth-Town Bill in Chancery, specifically naming as defendants in the complaint seventy-eight Associates "combining and confederating with many other Persons, to your Orators unknown, who, when discovered, they pray may be made Parties to this Bill, with apt Words to charge then."

      - 21 May 1746. After several postponements by the Associates' counsel, Lewis Morris died.

      - 8 August 1747. Jonathan Belcher, who was likely to be an Associate sympathizer, was appointed to replace Morris as governor. No attempt was made by the Proprietors to bring their cause to hearing after Belcher's succession.

      - 21 July 1747. The text of the Elizabeth-Town Bill in Chancery was published by James Parker in New York City. The book is 171 pages, including hand-colored maps; 250 copies were printed. It is reproduced in Early American Imprints, First Series, #6022.

      THE ANSWER OF THE ELIZABETH-TOWN ASSOCIATES

      - About 1748. Two young lawyers, William Livingston, 27, and William Smith Jr., 23, were hired by the Associates to write their Answer to the Bill.

      - 1751. Livingston and Smith completed the Associates' Answer. The introduction includes, in paragraph form, with some erasures, the names of the men for whom this document was a "joint and several Answer." . . . .

      - 27 August 1751. The Elizabeth-Town Answer was read in a town meeting.

      - 28 August 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that the first 129 persons who signed their names had been "duly sworn to the matter contained in the Answer.".

      - 29 August 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that another 167 persons who signed their names had been duly sworn.

      - 30 August 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that another 11 persons who signed their names had been duly sworn.

      - 5 September 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that another 123 persons who signed their names had been duly sworn, but this is in error, as there are 128 signatures, an error repeated in the Chancery's manuscript copies and the 1752 publication (below). This undercounting produced an erroneous and oft-repeated total of 448 signators; the correct total is 453.

      - 6 September 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that another 6 persons who signed their names had been duly sworn.

      - 10 September 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that another 11 persons who signed their names had been duly sworn.

      - 27 September 1751. The Master in Chancery recorded on the original Answer that one additional signator had been duly sworn.

      - 26 November 1751. The Answer, with the signatures of 453 Associates, was formally filed with Anthony White.

      - 13 February 1752. The Chancery copy at New Jersey Historical Society notes that Anthony White, one of the many councils [sic; should be counsels] for the complainants, delivered the manuscript copy of the Answer to his clients. . . .

      - 1752. James Parker published the text to the Answer in New York City. It does not include the paragraph of names in the introduction, nor the notation about those who have died. The chronological order of the signatures was eliminated, replaced by a semi-alphabetical list. Two names are included in the printed volume that do not appear in either the original Answer or Chancery's manuscript copy. . . . The published book is 64 oversized pages. Copies exist in several rare-book collections, including New York Public Library, New York Historical Society, and New Jersey Historical Society. It is reproduced in Early American Imprints, First Series, #11765.

      - 1784. Although the Proprietors continued to function as an entity after the end of the Revolutionary War, feudal claims such as quitrents were extinguished, and the landholders of Elizabeth-Town were finally secure in their titles.

      THE ORIGINAL SIGNATURES OF THE ELIZABETH-TOWN ASSOCIATES . . .

      Abner Frost . . . .

      (3) Charnee Smit :

      WILL OF ABNER FROST - Essex County, NJ - dated 3 April 1775; transcribed 1994. (Wills 56.25)

      In the name of God Amen. I ABNER FROST of the borough of Elizabeth in the county of Essex and Province of East New Jersey, Cordwinder. Being of sound mind and memory and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life, do therefore make and ordain this my last will and testament. That is to say first of all and principally I give and recommend my soul unto the hand of god that gave it and for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a Christian like manner at the direction of my executor. Nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of god and as (touching?) such worldly estate wherewith it hath ___? God to bless me within this life. I give and dispose of the same in the following manner, Imprimis.

      I give and bequeath unto my loving wife HANNAH FROST two cows and one mare or horse which is left to her choice and bed and bedding and half of the live hogs, and to the value of 5 pounds in grain and meat, the above mentioned articles with a piece of land that I have given and bequeathed to my loving wife, Hannah FROST as is her right of Dower with a privilege of living in the house and the use of so much land as is not wanted to discharge debts or the maintenance and support of NAOMI AND SARAH daughters of ABNER FROST, during her widowhood, Imprimis. I do order that all my just debts be paid out of my moveable estate if there is effects enough, if not, I do order that my executor sell off land at the Northwest end of my land adjoining Thomas Willis's, so much as will discharge all my just debts and funeral charges, Imprimis. I do further order that NAOMI AND SARAH FROST, daughters of ABNER FROST be maintained out of my real estate and for their support. I do order that my executor sells land at the lower end of my place adjoining SAMUEL MEEKER and from thence to continue selling as far as is granting for their support and that it be left to the direction of my executor when to sell and when to pay the girls, Imprimis. I give and bequeath to my daughter PRUDENCE all the moveables that she now has which has been lent to her before, that is charged in my book, page 53, which I value at 15 pounds, Imprimis. I give and bequeath unto my loving son JEDEDIAH FROST and his son JOSIAH FROST all the remainder of my real estate if and be after the (decease ?) of my loving wife Hannah and my daughters Naomi and Sarah, to be equally divided as to quality and quantity. And I ordain and appoint SAMUEL MEEKER of Springfield of the borough of Elizabeth and county of Essex, Executor and guardian of this my last will and testament.

      Hereby utterly (deallowing?) and revoking all former will made by me. In witness thereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this third day of April (3 April) in the year of our lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy five (1775) and in the fourteenth year of the reign of our sovereign Lord George the Third.

      Signed, published and declared by the said ABNER FROST as his last will and testament in the presence of Thomas WILLIS and Thomas WOODRUFF.

      Signed: ABNER FROST

      Thomas WILLIS and Stephen WOODRUFF attest to witnessing will and ABNER FROST signature. Sworn at Newark the 14th day of January 1779 before

      ELISHA BOUVINOT, Surrogate.

      Samuel MEEKER sworn as sole executor same day before Elisha BOUVINOT, surrogate.

      Inventory of moveable estate of ABNER FROST late of Westfield, taken 2 Dec. 1777 by SAMUEL MEEKER Executor and verified by Stephen WOODRUFF and John Clark-3rd. Total value 82 pounds-15 shilling.

      Copy of Inventory not available.

      Will recorded/probate 1778 in W20 folio 126.
    Person ID I5445  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 12 Jun 2019 

    Father Joseph FROST,   b. Abt 1644, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 11 Mar 1698, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 54 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Elizabeth HUBBELL,   b. 16 Nov 1659, Guilford, New Haven County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F2965  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Rebecca HALL,   b. 23 Nov 1703 
    Married 24 Sep 1723  Stratfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Naomi FROST,   b. 20 Nov 1726, Stratfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     2. Margaret FROST,   b. Abt 1728, Stratfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. Jedediah FROST,   b. 7 May 1724, Stratfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Eleazer FROST,   b. 24 Oct 1725, Stratfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Jan 1726, Stratfield, Fairfield County, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 12 Jun 2019 23:03:19 
    Family ID F2983  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Hannah (FROST) 
    Married Aft 24 Sep 1723 
    Last Modified 12 Jun 2019 23:03:19 
    Family ID F3678  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart