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Capt. Robert FROST

Male Abt 1744 - Abt 1819  (~ 75 years)


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  • Name Robert FROST 
    Title Capt. 
    Born Abt 1744  NC, VA or Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Will 21 Mar 1819  Hawkins County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died Abt Jul 1819  Hawkins County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Probate Aug 1819  Hawkins County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • (1) Robert FROST was born in NC, VA or Ireland, and died in 1819 in Hawkins County, TN. Male descendants of his are members of Frost Family Y-DNA Group 6. The Frost Surname DNA Project website does not identify his parents. Robert FROST is placed here as a son of Joseph FROST, Sr., but there can be no assurance that such placement is correct.

      (2) Frost Surname DNA Project <https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/frost/about/results>:

      Y-DNA Group 6:

      [Participant] 178516 is a 4th-great-grandson of Robert Frost. His pedigree follows:

      • Robert Frost b. in NC?/VA?, USA or in Ireland?; d. 1819 in Hawkins Co., TN; m. circa 1792? to Sarah Roberts (b. in NC/VA, USA; d. after 1819 in Hawkins Co.?, TN?)

      • Simeon R. Frost b. circa 1802 in TN; d. after 1870 in Owsley Co.?, KY?

      • Guilford S. Frost b. 1832 in Claiborne Co., TN; d. between 1902 and 1910 in Pope Co.?, AR?; m. circa 1874 to Rachel M. (-?-) (b. 1855 in AR; d. after 1900 in Pope Co.?, AR?)

      • Gilford Tennessee Frost b. 1875 in MO or AR; d. 1937 in Merced Co., CA; m. 1895 in Pope Co., AR, to Laura Eveline Cole (b. 1880 in AR; d. 1939 in Merced Co., CA)

      • Private

      • Private

      • Private

      Robert Frost appears on an 1810 tax list for Hawkins Co., TN, and left a will there in 1819 naming his older children, including Simeon. The 1880 census for a daughter of Robert reports that her father was born in Ireland and her mother in Tennessee. The 1880 census for John Frost, possible son of Robert, reports that both of his parents were born in Tennessee. (See the write-up for [Participant] 80783 for more information about John Frost.) At the time Robert and wife Sarah were born, what would become the state of Tennessee was considered part of either North Carolina or (in the extreme northern section) Virginia. Guilford S. Frost has not been located in the 1850 census. He married in 1853 in Owsley Co., KY, where Simeon Frost had settled, and he appears in the 1860 census in Hancock Co., TN, in the area where Simeon had lived previously, but definitive proof naming Guilford as son of Simeon is lacking. ANALYSIS: These results are a 36/37 marker match to the Group 6 baseline, with a presumed mutation at DYS marker 385b, which is one of the faster-changing markers. Contact E-mail: davefrost@comcast.net

      (3) Frost Surname DNA Project <https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/frost/about/results>:

      Y-DNA Group 6:

      [Participant] 204415 is a 4th-great-grandson of Robert Frost. His pedigree follows:

      • Robert Frost b. in NC?/VA?, USA or in Ireland?; d. 1819 in Hawkins Co., TN; m. circa 1792? to Sarah Roberts (b. in NC/VA, USA; d. after 1819 in Hawkins Co.?, TN?)

      • Simeon R. Frost b. circa 1802 in TN; d. after 1870 in Owsley Co.?, KY?

      • Robert Frost b. circa 1824 in TN; d. between 1864 and 1870 in Owsley Co.?, Kentucky?; m. Elizabeth Moore (b. circa 1825 in Owsley Co., KY; d. 1854 in Owsley Co., KY)

      • James Anderson "Anse" Frost b. 1849 in Owsley Co., KY; d. 1912 in Jobe township, Oregon Co., MO; m. circa 1863 to Sarah Lucinda Miller (b. circa 1842 in VA; d. 1909)

      • John William Frost b. 1871 in Owsley Co., KY; d. 1946 in Cow Creek, Owsley Co., KY; m. circa 1896 to Nancy Ann Eversole (b. 1873 in KY; d. 1955 in Cow Creek, Owsley Co., KY)

      • Graydon Moore Frost b. 1911 in Owsley Co., KY; d. 1998 in CA; m. Ruth Ellen Parker (b. 1913 in Owsley Co., KY; d. 1987 in Inyo Co., CA)

      • Private

      Robert Frost appears on an 1810 tax list for Hawkins Co., TN, and left a will there in 1819 naming his older children, including Simeon. The 1880 census for a daughter of Robert reports that her father was born in Ireland and her mother in Tennessee. The 1880 census for John Frost, possible son of Robert, reports that both of his parents were born in Tennessee. (See the write-up for [Participant] 80783 for more information about John Frost.) At the time Robert and wife Sarah were born, what would become the state of Tennessee was considered part of either North Carolina or (in the extreme northern section) Virginia. The younger Robert and wife Elizabeth Moore Frost have not been located in the 1850 census, but Robert received a land grant surveyed in 1847 in Owsley County, Kentucky, where Simeon Frost had settled, and Robert and his second wife are residing in that county in the 1860 census. Robert is also listed as having been born in Tennessee, where Simeon Frost previously lived. Robert is presumed to have been named for his paternal grandfather, but definitive proof naming Robert as son of Simeon is lacking. ANALYSIS: These results are a 36/37 marker match to the Group 6 baseline, with a presumed mutation at DYS marker CDYb, which is one of the faster-changing markers. Contact E-mail: crowwoman@mvdsl.com

      (4) On 8 October 1847, Wilson HENDERSON executed a declaration in support of his application for a Revolutionary War pension [R. 4878]. In his declaration, Wilson stated that he served a tour of duty under Capt. Robert FROST, where Wilson participated in the Battle of Eutaw Springs (the last major engagement of the Revolutionary War in the Carolinas).

      (5) Wilson HENDERSON, who married Sarah FROST, served under Capt. Robert FROST at the Battle of Eutaw Springs. The compiler has no conclusive proof of any relationship between Sarah FROST and Capt. FROST. Sarah was not mentioned in Capt. FROST's will dated March 21, 1819. However, the only household headed by a FROST in the 1790 census of Chester County, SC, where Wilson then resided, was a household headed by Capt. FROST.

      (6) The American Revolution in South Carolina <http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriots_sc_capt_robert_frost.h tml>:

      Capt. Robert Frost

      Known Regiment(s) Associated With: Fairfield Regiment, 1777-1780; Turkey Creek Regiment, 1780-1781; Fairfield Regiment, 1781-1782; Kershaw Regiment, 1782

      Known Lieutenants: Elisha Gore, John Mayfield

      Known Sergeants: John Gore, James Huey, Dabid Tomb

      Known Corporals: None Known

      Known Qms: None Known

      Known Privates, etc.: Samuel Carter, Asa Darby, James Ederington, Fletcher Edwards, Elisha Gore, James Gore, Michael Gore, Henry Harden, John Harden, James Hearne, Jesse Hearne, Wilson Henderson, Samuel Houston, John Nance, Peter Nance, Peter Petrie, James Pratt, John Pratt, Robert Proctor, John Roden, James Saunders, Samuel Sealy, Charles Smith, Jacob Stone, Jeremiah Thomas, David Tomb, John Walker, Hezekiah West

      Known Battles / Skirmishes: Hanging Rock, Aug. 6, 1780; Camden, Aug. 16, 1780; Fishing Creek, Aug. 18, 1780; Fish Dam Ford, Nov. 9, 1780; Blackstocks, Nov. 20, 1780; Bush River, May 1, 1781; Orangeburgh, May 11, 1781; Eutaw Springs, Sep. 8, 1781

      © 2009 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved.

      (7) Moss, Boby Gilmer, Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1994, p. 335:

      Frost, Robert

      He served as a captain and lost a mare in the battle at Fish Dam. In addition, he served forty-two days under Col. Richard Winn during 1781 and was under Col. Hopkins at Bush River during October and November. He also served fifty-six days at Orangeburg under Col. Winn during 1782. S.C.H.&G., V. 60; C.S.; A.A.2599; N9.

      (8) The American Revolution in South Carolina <http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/revolution_battle_of_eutaw_spri ngs.html>:

      [Battle of] Eutaw Springs, September 8, 1781 . . .

      Seven years of British determination to bring South Carolina to her knees met failure. The spirit that had long resisted royal edict and church canon, the fierce desire and indomitable will to be masters of their own destinies, and the dauntless courage that had carved a new way of life from a wilderness were again threatened by oppression; so, little difference was felt among nationalities and creeds, causing a unity to grow among the new world "peasants and shepherds" that shook the foundations of old regimes.

      By mid-summer, 1781, the Continentals under Major General Nathanael Greene had gained virtual control of South Carolina. The retreating British, disillusioned and sick with summer heat, united forces under Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart at Orangeburgh and began their march to Charlestown. Early in September, the 2,300 well-equipped British camped in cool shade beside the gushing springs of Eutaw, little dreaming the fairly large Patriot army was close upon their heels.

      Maj. Gen. Greene, hearing of Gen. George Washington's plan to encircle and embarrass the British at Yorktown, determined to prevent southern aid from reaching the beleaguered Lt. Gen. Charles, Lord Cornwallis. Contingents under generals Marion, Pickens, Lee, and colonels William Washington, Hampton, among other South Carolina leaders were called together, and reinforcements from other states joined them. These 2,092 poorly-equipped, underfed, and near-naked Americans camped on September 7th on the River Road at Burdell's Plantation, only seven miles from Eutaw Springs. Strategy for the ensuing attack is accredited to the genius of the dreaded "Swamp Fox," Brig. Gen. Francis Marion, who knew every foot of the Santee swamps and river.

      Robert D. Bass asserts in his 1959 book, entitled, "Swamp Fox," that Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene gave command of all Continentals to NC Brig. Gen. Jethro Sumner, and command of all militia to Brig. Gen. Francis Marion.

      After organizing his army for attack, Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene moved down the Congaree Road to Burdell's Tavern, only seven (7) miles from his enemy. At 4 a.m. on September 8th, he marched from Burdell's, his army in four columns, each detailed to its place at Eutaw Springs. Lt. Col. William Henderson led the advance with the SC State Troops and Lee's Legion. Brig. Gen. Francis Marion came next with the militia of North Carolina and South Carolina. Brig. Gen. Jethro Sumner followed with the Continentals, and Lt. Col. William Washington brought up the rear with his 3rd Regiment of Continental Dragoons.

      In his deployment, Brig. Gen. Francis Marion sent Brig. Gen. Andrew Pickens to the extreme left. In the center, he posted NC Col. Francois DeMalmedy and the militia of North Carolina. And from his own Brigade, he formed the right wing. Lt. Col. William Henderson covered the left wing and Lt. Col. Henry Lee and his Legion covered the right wing of all state troops and militia units.

      September 8th dawned fair and intensely hot, but the Patriots, on short rations and with little rest, advanced in early morning light toward the springs. At their approach the surprised British left their uneaten breakfast and quickly threw lines of battle across the road in a heavily wooded area. Behind them in cleared fields stood a large brick home with a high-walled garden. The woods and waters of Eutaw Creek were on the north.

      Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart quickly realized what was happening and he formed his troops in one line across the Congaree Road. On his extreme right, he posted Maj. John Majoribanks and a flank battalion behind a thicket a hundred paces in front of Eutaw Creek. In the center, he posted the 3rd Regiment of Guards and Col. John Harris Cruger's Loyalists, but under Cruger's command. On his left, he posted the 63rd Regiment of Foot and the 64th Regiment of Foot, their flank in air, but supported by Maj. John Coffin and his cavalry. He also posted Maj. Henry Sheridan and sharpshooters from the New York Volunteers in the exceedingly strong brick house of Patrick Roche, which stood in the field west of Eutaw Springs.

      Heavy firing soon crackled and boomed through the shady woods. At first the center of the Patriot line caved in, but while opposing flanks were fighting separate battles, Maj. Gen. Greene restored the center with North Carolina Continentals. The whole British line then began to give, but Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart quickly pulled up his left-flank reserves, forcing the Patriots to retreat under thunderous fire. The encouraged British shouted, yelled, and rushed forward in disorder; whereupon Maj. Gen. Greene (according to J. P. Petit) "brought in his strongest force: the Maryland and Virginia Continentals, Kirkwood's Delawares, and Lt. Colonel Washington's South Carolina [sic - Virginia] cavalry . . . with devastating effect."

      Both the British and the Continentals were astonished to see Marion's militiamen, steady, unfaltering, and advancing life veterans into the enemy's hottest fire. "The fire redoubled; our officers behaved with the greatest bravery, and the militia gained much honor by their firmness," Greene later reported to the Continental Congress. To Maj. Gen. Baron von Steuben he wrote that "such conduct would have graced the veterans of the Great King of Prussia.

      Brig. Gen. Francis Marion's militia units fired seventeen (17) rounds. Then, with ammunition exhausted, they retired in good order, leaving the fighting to Brig. Gen. Jethro Sumner's Continentals. "My Brigade behaved well," Marion later wrote to Lt. Col. Peter Horry.

      The Continentals moved forward with spirit. As the Patriots advanced, the left of the British line fell back in disorder, and Lt. Col. Henry Lee, wheeling his infantry upon them, increased the enemy's confusion. In the center, Col. Cruger's line held, British regulars meeting Continentals in hand-to-hand fighting, bayonets meeting bayonets, and swords clashing on swords. But the confusion on the British left soon affected the center, and when the Marylanders delivered a terrific fire, the whole British line, except for Maj. Majoribanks flankers, sagged, falterd, and began retreating.

      The British fled in every direction and the Patriots took over their camp. Only Maj. John Majoribanks, on the British right flank and pushed far back into the woods near Eutaw Creek, was able to hold his unit together. Maj. Henry Sheridan took hasty refuge in the brick home, Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart gathered some of his men beyond, and from this vantage they "picked off" many American officers and men.

      Maj. Gen. Greene then sent Lt. Col. Washington's cavalry to deal with Maj. Majoribanks, but penetrating the woods with horses was too difficult, so Lt. Col. Washington tried to encircle and rout, thus exposing himself to dangerous fire. His horse was shot from under him, he himself was wounded, and his company practically ravaged. When a hand-to-hand fight developed, a British soldier poised his sword over the wounded Lt. Col. Washington, but Maj. Majoribanks saw this and gallantly turned it aside. Washington was now his prisoner.

      In camp, eating the deserted breakfast, and feeling the battle was won, the hungry and thirsty Patriots began plundering the English stores of food, liquors, and equipment. Thoroughly enjoying themselves they ignored their leaders' warnings and commands. Maj. Majoribanks, realizing the disorder, fell upon them. Maj. Sheridan and Lt. Col. Stewart pounded at their right, and Maj. John Coffin came in from their left. The stunned Americans fought this impossible situation bravely, but they were quickly put to flight from the British camp.

      After more than four hours of indecisive battle under a merciless sun both armies had had enough. Casualties were extremely high. "Blood ran ankle deep in places," and the strewn area of dead and dying was heart-breaking.

      Maj. Gen. Greene collected his wounded and returned to Burdell's Tavern. Lt. Col. Stewart remained the night at Eutaw Springs but hastily retreated the next day toward Charlestown, leaving behind many of his dead unburied and seventy of his seriously wounded. The gallant Maj. John Majoribanks, wounded and on his way to Moncks Corner, died in a slave cabin on Wantoot Plantation. He was buried beside the road, but when lake waters were to cover that area his remains were removed by the S.G.P.S.A. to their present resting place at the Eutaw Springs Battlefield memorial.

      The total casualties came to 1,188, according to Rev. M. H. Osborne. Many were buried where they fell, therefore the whole battlefield is a hero's cemetery, sacred to the memory of courageous men. Patriot blood shed at Eutaw Springs was certainly not shed in vain. This last major battle in South Carolina completely broke the British hold in the South and, more important, denied needed aid to the North. Only six weeks later, Lord Cornwallis succumbed to Gen. George Washington at Yorktown, and American independence was assured.

      According to Benson J. Jossing in his Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution - the Patriots lost 152 killed, 424 wounded, and 40 missing; the British lost 85 killed, 72 wounded, and 500 captured as prisoners.

      Known Patriot Participants . . .

      Fairfield Regiment detachment led by Col. Richard Winn, with five (5) known companies, led by:

      • Capt. Robert Frost
      • Capt. Edward Martin
      • Capt. John McCool
      • Capt. Felix Warley
      • Capt. John Watts

      (9) A household headed by Robert FROST is listed in the 1790 census of Chester County, SC.

      Listed in Robert's household are 2 free white males over 16 years of age; 3 free white males under 16 years of age; and 4 free white females.

      Assuming that Robert is 1 of the 2 free white males listed in his household in the 1790 census as then being over 16 years of age, he would have been born before 1774, according to the 1790 census.

      The information listed in the 1790 census is insufficient to enable the compiler to identify the other persons then in Robert's household.

      [Note by compiler: Robert's household is the only household headed by a FROST in the 1790 census of Chester County, SC.]

      (10) The Tennessee Genealogical Magazine, "Ansearchin'" News, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Fall 1991), p. 116:

      Petitions to the General Assemby of Tennessee: . . .

      23-1-1799 Petition of citizens of Hawkins Co that live on the NW side of Clinch Mountain complain of distance and difficulty to get to Court House and wish to hold their own elections and muster "on our own side of the mountain." Signers were: . . .

      Robert Frost

      (11) Creekmore, Pollyanna, "Early East Tennessee Taxpayers," in East Tennessee Historical Society Publication No. 32, Knoxville, TN: 1960, pp. 119, 126-127:

      HAWKINS COUNTY, TENNESSEE TAX LISTS
      1809-1812

      Key to Column Numbers
      [1] Land
      [2] White Polls
      [3] Black Polls . . .

      Capt Looney Company 1810 . . .

      Frost, Robrt
      [1] 250
      [2] 1
      [3]

      (12) http://tngenweb.org/hawkins/frost-robert-will/:

      Will of Robert Frost
      Will Book ___, Page 181
      Proven: Aug. Term, 1819

      This is my last Will and Testament made in the year of our Lord 1819.

      I want the land on South side Clinch River equally divided betwixt my three eldest sons, Thomas Frost, William Frost & Simeon Frost,

      and I want Wm. Farmer and his wife Elizabeth Farmer to have the upper end of survey down to the steep gut which lies on the north side of said river.

      The remainder part of the land and what other property is left for Sarah Frost to raise the children in during her widowhood,

      & as the children grows up I want Sarah Frost the widow of Robert Frost to divide the land and property to be as near equal with the other children as possible.

      Interlined before assigned. [sic]

      This being my last will and Testament, whereunto I set my hand and seal, March the 21st, 1819.

      Robert [X] Frost (seal) (his mark)

      Witness:

      R. W. Lovin
      William Farmer

      [Note by compiler: The testator apparently did not list all of his children in his will; e.g., he listed his "eldest three sons," thereby implying that he had one or more younger sons.]
    Person ID I43971  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 26 Sep 2018 

    Father Joseph FROST, Sr.,   b. Abt 1710,   d. Abt 1790, Amherst County, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 80 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F402  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah ROBERTS,   b. Abt 1774, NC or VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 21 Mar 1819, Probably Hawkins County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 45 years) 
    Married Abt 1792 
    Children 
     1. Simeon R. FROST,   b. Abt 1802, TN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 28 Jul 1870, Probably Owsley County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years)  [natural]
     2. John FROST,   b. Abt 1804, TN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1880, Probabably Hawkins County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 26 Sep 2018 14:55:00 
    Family ID F25734  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart