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Luur Jacobsen VAN KUYKENDALL

Male Bef 1650 - Aft 1720  (> 71 years)


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  • Name Luur Jacobsen VAN KUYKENDALL 
    Born Bef 29 May 1650  New Amsterdam, New Netherland [now New York City, New York County, NY] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 29 May 1650  Reformed Dutch Church, New Amsterdam, New Netherland [now New York City, New York County, NY] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Name Luur JACOBSEN 
    Name Luur Jacobsen VAN KUYKENDAAL 
    Died Aft 1720  Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 

    • (1) http://www.altlaw.com/edball/dutchbap.htm:

      Baptisms at the Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam (1639-1730)
      Manually Entered by Theodore Brassard

      [Note: The baptisms are laid out in order as follows: The date of the baptism; the parents; the child; and the witnesses. Note the separation of each item by semicolons.]

      BAPTISMS OF 1650

      29 May; Jacob Luurszen; Luur; Tobias Teuniszen, Janneken Claes

      (2) Kuykendall, George Benson, History of the Kuykendall Family, Kilham Stationery & Printing Co., Portland, OR: 1919, pp. 387-388:

      Children of LUUR JACOBSEN VAN KUYKENDAAL (1), baptized May 29, 1650, and Grietje Artze Tack, baptized August 16, 1663.

      STYNTJE (2), baptized at Kingston, N. Y., April 2, 1682, married Jurian Westvael, son of Johannes Westvael and Maritje Kool. Styntje died and Jurian married 2nd, Maritje Cuddeback, August 29, 1716.

      JACOB (2), baptized at Kingston, N. Y., August 12, 1683; married 1st Adrientje Tietsoort; 2nd, Sarah Westvael, daughter of Johannes Westvael and Maritje Kool.

      JOHANNES (2), baptized at Kingston, N. Y., April 20, 1685, died in infancy.

      CORNELIUS (2), baptized at Kingston, May 30, 1686; married Maritje Westvael, daughter of Johannes Westvael and Maritje Kool.

      JOHANNES (2), baptized at Kingston, N. Y., September 30, 1688. The first Johannes died in infancy, the second grew to manhood, enlisted July 11, 1711, for an expedition to Canada, from Ulster county, N. Y. Nothing further known of him.

      MATTHEW (2), born about 1690-1692 at Raycester (Rochester), now Accord, N. Y. Married Jannetje Westvael, March 27, 1715, daughter of Johannes Westvael and Maritje Kool of Minisink.

      ARIE (2), born at Raycester (Rochester), Ulster county, N. Y. Baptized at Kingston, June 8, 1694. Married Grietjen Kwik, who was born also at Raycester.

      PIETER (2), baptized at Minisink, May 1, 1698; married Femmetje Decker, July 8, 1719, daughter of Hendrik Dekker and Antje Kwik. They lived at Minisink (Machackemeck).

      ANNETJE (2), baptized at Kingston, May 19, 1700; married Roelof Brink at Kingston, September 27, 1718.

      ZARA (2), born at Minisink, baptized at Kingston, N. Y., June 14, 1702; married Jacob Middagh (born at Neschotah), October 18, 1724; both lived at Rochester, Ulster county, N. Y.

      SYTGEN (2), born at Minisink, baptized at Kingston, N. Y., October 27, 1706. Married first, Ary Van Etten, May 9, 1729; second, Cornelius Kool; date not found.

      (3) The following information was compiled by Gene Kuykendall in 1997:

      [I]n the vicinity of Kingston, NY, Luur Jacobsen grew up and married Grietje Tack. Old unpublished Kingston records show they rented a farm at Marbletown in 1681. The baptisms of the eleven children of Luur and Grietje are recorded in the records Kingston DRC. Kingston became the first capital of the colony of New York.

      In 1664, the British, irritated by the growing population of Dutch between the British colonies of Boston and Virginia, surrounded New Amsterdam with a large naval force and forced New Netherland to become a British Colony, renamed New York.

      Inheriting a strong pioneering spirit and probably sick of British soldiers and taxes, Luur and Grietje moved their family around 1698 from the vicinity of Kingston to the Delaware valley wilderness known by the Indians inhabitants as Minisink or Machackemeck (now Port Jervis, Orange county, NY).

      The Kingston DRC records tell us only that Luur and his family were in "Minisink" by 1700. The term Minisink referred to a vast territory along the Delaware valley in the tri-state region of NY/NJ/PA. However, only two areas were settled before 1700, Peenpack and Machackemeck. Peenpack, or the Upper Neighborhood, was well documented by Peter Gumaer and Luur was not one of the early settlers there. We know that William Tietsoort had been granted land in Machackemeck, or the Lower Neighborhood, in 1698 and we also know that Luur Jacobsen's oldest son, Jacob, married a daughter of William Tietsoort. I think we can fairly safely assume that Luur came to Machackemeck with William Tietsoort around 1698. If for no other reason than the fact that there don't seem to be any other possibilities. Old Minisink Village (Sussex Co, NJ) where Luur's sons, Jacob and Matthew later owned property wasn't settled until in the 1720's. The section of Minisink on the PA side of the Delaware wasn't settled until even later.

      Initially the local Leni-Lenape Indians, (called the Delaware by European settlers), were friendly toward these new neighbors. However, the Europeans' penchant for exclusive land ownership soon led to hostilities. The history books reflect K-Family members among those scalped and kidnapped by Indian raiding parties.

      There in Minisink, Luur Jacobsen adopted a toponym?church records of 1706 list "Luur Jacobsen van Kuykendaal". Early Dutch Genealogists Van Laer and Versteeg explained the name to mean "van kijk-in-t'dal", translated "from view of the valley" i.e.; From Wageningen overlooking the Rhine valley. Not Chicken-Valley or Church-in-the-Valley as some references suggest.

      Adopting a toponym (place of origin) in America to supplement or replace their Dutch patronym (son of) was not uncommon, for example, Oloff Stevenszen added van Cortlant and Claes Martinszen added van Roosevelt. All three are surnames not found previously in Europe, but strictly of American origin. (Offers of European coat-of-arms for the Kuykendalls, Cortlands and Roosevelts are thus a fabrication by those who sell such items.)

      The prefix, "van" meaning "from", disappeared from the surname within two generations.

      The van Kuykendall children and grandchildren married with the neighboring Dutch families of Westfall, Tietsoort, Westbrook, Decker, Quick, Cole, Cortright, Van Auken, Van Etten, Depue, Van Vliet etc. Also with the Huguenot French families of Gumaer, Swartwout, Cuddeback, DuBois and Freer all of whom spoke Dutch and attended the Dutch Reform Church.

      Some have been led to believe that church records for the Minisink/Machackemeck (Deerpark) DRC were lost for the years 1720- 1736. Histories of the Dutch Reform Churches in America reveal the following: The Deerpark DRC was not established until 1737. Until that time, Dominies from the established Kingston DRC travelled to the remote areas to perform baptisms which were later entered into the Kingston DRC records. The first Dominie at the Deerpark DRC found notes on baptisms performed in 1716-1719 in Minisink that had never been recorded in Kingston. He appended them to the Deerpark records which actually began in 1737. Hence, the appearance of missing records for 1720-1736.

      We have no record of when Luur or Grietje died. We know only that both are last recorded in Deerpark church records in 1720.

      Five of the sons of Luur and Grietje lived to raise families, Jacob, Cornelius, Matthew, Arie and Pieter.

      Jacob van Kuykendall was among the residents who granted land in Old Minisink Village (Sussex Co, NJ) for a schoolhouse and a burying ground. That old cemetery can still be found, with some perseverance, back in the woods. There are fieldstone markers hand carved in old Dutch with some 1700's dates still decipherable.

      Where did Jacob, Cornelius and Arie live out their lives? The evidence seems strongest for Warren and Hunterdon Counties in NJ. Property granted to a Cornelius K at Northampton, PA in 1753 was believed to refer to Cornelius van Kuykendall, son of Luur. A later record of a Cornelius K improving that land makes it much more likely that this land was granted to his grandson, Cornelius Kuykendall.

      Son Mattheus, and various grandsons began to migrate following the settlement patterns of this new country. Some moved south first to NJ/PA then VA/WV/NC then TN/KY and next west to TX. Some went to Upstate NY and, traveling primarily by boat across mighty rivers, to the Midwest and eventually across the Oregon Trail in covered wagons to the Far West.

      The grandsons of Luur and Grietje who accepted early land grants in VA (WV) and NC, left a Dutch environment and entered an Anglicized environment. This meant the loss of the meticulous records of marriages and baptisms kept by the DRC's. Largely for this reason, there remains some doubt and serious disagreement about the lineage of the lines from NC. Were Abraham, Peter, Jacobus (James), Jonathan and Jacob the sons of Matthew or Cornelius? Researchers like Velma Winn and Betty Price are still working on this puzzle.

      Pieter van Kuykendall, youngest son of Luur and Grietje, married Femmetje Decker and purchased a large tract of land from the Decker family in Machackemeck. This old farm literally encompassed the current village of Port Jervis. A historical marker depicts where Pieter's farm was burned in an Indian raid.

      The descendants of Pieter tended be the only ones who remained in the Machackemeck area pioneered by Luur. This is fortunate for later descendants like myself who have the have the advantage of additional years of Dutch Reform Church records to identify our lineage.

      K-FAMILY SURNAME and VARIATIONS:

      After Luur abandoned the patronymic custom and adopted the surname first recorded a Van Kuykendaal the prefix Van was dropped within a generation or two and the spelling tended to become Kuykendall.

      The descendants of Jacob and Mattheus, most of whom migrated to VA/WV/NC tend to be found today with the original version, Kuykendall.

      Some of the descendants of Cornelius who migrated to PA/OH comprise most, if not all, of the Kikendall/Kirkendall/Kirkendale branches.

      The descendants of Pieter who remained in the vicinity of Port Jervis, Orange Co., NY before migrating primarily to Upstate NY are to be found as Cuykendall/Coykendall with the one exception noted below:

      Wilhelmus Kuykendall, gr-grandson of Luur and my gr-gr-gr grandfather moved to old Mamakating Village (Wurtsboro, Sullivan Co., NY) before the Dominies and Clerks institutionalized their common misspelled versions (Cuykendall/Coykendall) of the surname.

      Factors involved in these and other variations of the surname probably include:

      1. Dominies and Clerks, primarily in the 18th century, attempted to spell the name phonetically as they heard it. Some old land records and wills show two or three different spellings for the same individual within a single document. Some of these variations caught-on and became accepted by the families.

      2. Regional variations in pronunciation: Some today spell the name Kuykendall or Coykendall but pronounce it "Kirkendall". There are also a few examples of families who changed the spelling to agree with the accepted pronunciation.

      3. A few arbitrary changes by individuals primarily during the 1800's before names and records became standardized and assumed the importance they have today. In the 1919 book "History of the Kuykendall Family" there is correspondence from individuals whose uncles and cousins utilize different variations of the surname.

      For example: Several years ago, I had a phone conversation with an elderly Miss. Coykendall. She said her father spelled the name Kuykendall but when she read about the wealthy Mr. Samuel Decker Coykendall of Kingston, NY, she realized that her father spelled the name incorrectly and she changed it.

      K-FAMILIES IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE U.S.A.

      The English colonized New Netherland in 1664 and the Continental Congress effectively made it a part of the United States in 1776. Despite these efforts to Anglicize and Americanize, some Dutch communities flourished into the 1800's. Their residents speaking the Dutch language, attending the Dutch Reform Church and following Dutch customs. One such was Mamakating, now Wurtsboro, Sullivan county, NY. For a description, read Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle. Also check out the old abandoned Stanton Cemetery in Wurtsboro (Mamakating) for the Kuykendalls who were among that Dutch speaking community until the mid-1800's.

      There are records of a number of our early K-Family ancestors fighting for independence in the Revolutionary War. All seem to have sided with the revolutionists, no known Tories. A number of K-Family descendants have qualified for membership in the DAR and SAR based on pension applications and other documentation.

      As new territories developed to the South, West and North, we consistently find K-Family members in the records among the earliest pioneers.

      Some of the earliest Kuykendall's in Texas were NC descendants who were Col. Austin's original 300 and played key roles in forming Austin's Colony. These have been documented by a Mr. Marshall Kuykendall of Austin, Texas for a History of Texas to be published in 1995/1996.

      We find Northern versus Southern state K-family cousins fighting against cousins on opposite sides of the bloody Civil War.

      Many K-Family members are to be found in the records of WWI and WWII and subsequent military actions.

      The bad news is that one finds no royalty, presidents, generals or captains of industry in the historical records of the K-Family.

      The good news is that one also finds no thieves, swindlers, traitors or murderers. Only honest, hardworking, loyal and religious folks. . . .

      REFERENCE?HISTORY OF THE KUYKENDALL FAMILY

      In 1919, Dr. George Benson Kuykendall published this comprehensive book covering all descendants of Luur Jacobsen (van Kuykendaal). Dr. Kuykendall's book has since become the starting point for generations of researchers. Dr. Kuykendall made three important contributions:

      He worked with noted Dutch-American genealogists of that era to develop an audit trail of our Dutch-American ancestors.

      Through ads in major city newspapers, he solicited voluminous correspondence in an attempt to trace all lines of the family and to bring them all up to date (1919).

      And, perhaps most importantly, he documented and published the results of his work for all of us to share.

      This 1919 book has its share of errors and typos, as does any published family history of this scope. For this reason, published family histories can only be utilized as a starting point, to be confirmed with sound genealogical evidence and updated for individual family lines.

      The book suffers from presenting information alternatively in three forms: data, narrative and correspondence. The resulting need to hunt through multiple chapters for information about an individual or family has proven frustrating and provided motivation for me to develop of what I have termed, a "Genealogical Name Index". (An all-name index with some additional information)

      Available at major genealogical libraries. Also on microfilm at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, available through Family History Centers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (Consult telephone directory) FHL Film # 1421894

      All-Name Index for The History of the Kuykendall Family by G. B. Kuykendall Developed and privately published 1995 by E. L. Kuykendall Submitted to the Family History Library for microfilming.

      REFERENCE?KUYKENDALL FAMILIES OF AMERICA, Vol's 1-6
      Compiled by Velma Kuykendall Winn

      This is not a family history book, instead it is an excellent reference compendium for any serious K family researcher with extensive reproduction of source documents, research articles and submitted family data sheets covering all lines. e.g.;

      The outbreak of World War I prevented Dr. Kuykendall from researching Dutch records on our ancestors in the Netherlands, but later researchers, Velma Kuykendall Winn and William A. Kirkendale have researched the Archives of the Netherlands providing what we currently know today about our earliest ancestors. Emily Stowell also researched New Netherland records and developed a series of articles about our ancestors. Arlene Saffell undertook the enormous task of verifying much of the data in Dr. Kuykendall's book. Her efforts resulted in an "Outline of the Kuykendall Family" with verifications, corrections and additions, noted with source document references. Marshall Kuykendall has documented the Kuykendalls who came to Texas with Col. Austin. There remains confusion over the sons of Matthew vs Cornelius. Betty Price, for one, continues to research that issue. Herbert Smith has also been an active K family researcher. He and others have developed errata sheets for Dr. Kuykendall's book. Mrs. Arlene Coyykendall Sgretti was an avid researcher of that line and has provided much of what we know about the Coykendalls. Mr. Warren Ronald Kirkendall has worked to update an earlier research on the Kikendall/Kirkendall line. The work of these researchers and others, along with years of collecting source documents, plus many submitted family data sheets have been published by Velma Winn as a service to other K family researchers.

      Available on microfilm at Family Data Centers:
      Vol. I FHL Film # 1033715 Item 1
      Vol. II FHL Film # 1035624 Item 3
      Vol. III FHL Film # 1035624 Item 4
      Vol. IV FHL Film # 1035624 Item 5
      Vol. V FHL Film # 1035624 Item 6
      Vol. VI (with Index) Soon to be available

      REFERENCE?OTHER FAMILY HISTORIES:

      Several family history books have been published covering individual lines. The first three listed below are available through FHC's. Others are on file at the Library of Congress or major genealogical libraries.

      A Forest of Many Trees, 1976, by Velma K. Winn Traces author's line?descendant of Matheus van Kuykendall. Also includes results of research of old Dutch records in the Netherlands.

      Our Dutch Heritage: The Family of Theodore P. Kuykendall, 1984, by E.L. Kuykendall Part I: Updated compilation of all research findings on the ancestors and family of Luur. Part II: Traces author's line

      Our Dutch Heritage II: The Descendants of Pieter van Kuykendaal, - Kuykendalls, Coykendalls and Cuykendalls, 1989, by E.L. Kuykendall. Traces all descendants of youngest son of Luur with additional coverage of maternal lines.

      Andrew Kuykendall from Kentucky, 1977, by Jerry M. Kuykendall Traces author's line?descendant of Matheus van Kuykendall

      Ouders, 1981, by William A. Kirkendale. Traces author's line?descendant of Cornelius van Kuykendall. Also includes results of research of old Dutch records in the Netherlands.

      Curve-in-Valley, by William A. Kirkendale. An unpublished update of Ouders, completed just before the author's death in 1984. Suggests a different theory on origin of the surname Kuykendall.

      Jacob Luyersen, by William A. Kirkendale. Research findings of author and others on our Dutch immigrant ancestor. Holland Society of NY, de Halve-Maen, Vol LVII No. 1, December 1983

      Looking Back Vol. I, 1984, by Edwin D. Kuykendall. Traces author's line?descendant of Matheus/Cornelius (?) van Kuykendall. One of the "lost souls" who are unable to prove their line back to Luur. Includes extensive transcriptions of reference records.

      Matt and Daisy Dell Kuykendall Crownover: Their Ancestry and Posterity, 1986, by Ernest Elder Crownover. Traces author's line?descendant of Matheus/Cornelius (?) van Kuykendall. Another of the "lost souls' who are unable to prove their line back to Luur.

      History of the Kikendall Family, by Robert L. Clifford Manuscript. Copy at Library of Congress.

      Descendants of William Coykendall of Wantage, Sussex co, NJ, 1982, by Chester Johnson Manuscript. Copy at New York Genealogical and Biographical Society

      Descendants and Forebears of James Kuykendall Byers and Ary Ann Burch: A Southern Family, 1989, by Norma (Harris) Garbert. Well researched book on NC descendants of Matheus or Cornelius van Kuykendall.

      Ancestors & Descendants of Cornelius Kuykendall 1813-1890, 1992, by Barry Underwood. Descendants of Matheus or Cornelius van Kuykendall.

      Abraham (Kuykendall) of Flat Rock, 1992, Pauline B. Beyer. Famous son of Matheus or Cornelius van Kuykendall. Flat Rock, NC celebrates an annual Abraham Kuykendall Day.

      Catherina (Glass) Koehler: Descendant of Jacob Luurszen van Kuykendall. Research Manuscript, updated by Warren R. Kukendall. A compilation of the descendants of Leur Kuykendall/Kikendall/Kirkendall (son of Cornelius van Kuykendall).

      Benjamin Kuykendall, Gentleman?"Jersey Ben" Kuykendall, by Arlene Saffell. Author's research on "Gentleman Ben" and "Jersey Ben" Kuykendall. Yesteryears Magazine, Winter 1968 (on file, Tioga Co, NY Historical Society).

      MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS WITH KUYKENDALL REFERENCES:

      Samuel Decker Coykendall of Kingston, NY, (cited in many publications). Wealthy owner of railroads, steamships, canals, cement plant & hotels in Catskill Mts of NY. He funded translation of the Kingston Dutch Reform Church records of baptism & marriage. See, for example: "The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock", 1982, Alf Evers, The Overlook Press "The Ulster and Delaware...Railroad Through the Catskills", 1972, Gerald M. Best, Golden West Books Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, 1891, Roswell Randall Hoes, see "Dedication".

      Old Deerpark Days?Kuykendall Family, Mar/Apr 1893, by W. H. Nearpas A series of articles published in Church Life by Deerpark Dutch Reform Church. Published by Jean D. Worden, 1988.

      The Old Mine Road?Van Kuykendall Family Genealogy, Art # 24, by Charles Stickney. A series of 28 articles published in the Wantage Recorder, Sussex co, NJ, in 1911-1912. Compiled from original articles and indexed by E. L. Kuykendall, not published. Copies in Historical Societies of Sussex co, NJ and Orange co, NY.

      Old Sussex County Families?Kuykendall, pg 135-138, by Charles Stickney. A series of articles published in the Wantage Recorder, Sussex co, NJ, in the 1930's. Published by Virginia Alleman Brown of Genealogical Researchers, 1988.

      The Cemetery at Old Minisink Village, by E. L. Kuykendall. Land donated for school house and burying ground by Jacob van Kuykendall & others, 1731. Ancient cemetery with field stones, some bearing 1700's dates, lies buried in the wilderness. Decipherable inscriptions transcribed and cemetery mapped by author. The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 117 No. 3, July 1986.

      Squire Stickney's 1895 History of Sussex, NJ, Augmented Edition, 1977 Gateway Press, Inc. Originally: "A History of Deckertown", 1895, Charles E. Stickney. A series originally published in The Wantage Recorder. All Name Index prepared by E. L. Kuykendall.

      The Decker Geneaology, 1980 by Admir. Benton Weaver Decker. Privately published, this is a bit of a who's-who of Dutch families who married Deckers. There are 171 references to Kuykendalls in the index.

      Minisink and Walkill Precinct Historical Chronicle (1940-1962) by William J. Coulter. This is a series of 230 articles about early families in the Minisink (NY) and Walkill (NJ) precincts written by amateur genealogist, William Coulter and published from 1940-1962 in the Wantage Recorder. These newspaper artilcles are on file at the Sussex Co. (NJ) Historical Society. These newspaper articles were also compiled and indexed in 1982 by George and Virginia Gardner. Their resulting 1,153 page work was bound as four volumes and copies donated to three locations. The Minisink Valley Historical Society, in Port Jervis, NY, the Orange County (NY) Genealogical Society & the Newburgh (NY) Library, Local History Room. There are over 110 references to variations of the Kuykendall surname in the index.

      Genealogical Notes Prepared by W. H. Nearpass. A similar set of sketches about the early families in Deerpark (Orange Co., NY) published in Church Life by the Reformed Dutch Church of Deerpark in 1890-1904. This series of articles was transcribed (105 pages) and indexed in 1988 by Jean D. Worden and published along with the Deerpark Dutch Reform Church Records of baptism, marriages and membership and also the Machackemeck Cemetery inscriptions as a single volume entitled "Deerpark, Orange County, New York".

      The Kingston Papers Revisited, by Gene Kuykendall Published in New Netheland Connections, May 1966, by Dorothy Koenig. The Kingston Papers refers to the court minutes and secretary's papers (recorded in Dutch) from 1661-1684. All records have translated into English but only the records from 1661-1675 have been published as a 2-volume set. It seems to be a little known fact that the remaining records for 1675-1684 have been compiled, semi-indexed and are available to researchers at the Ulster County Clerk's office, in Kingston , NY. For instance, the latter contain a record of our Luur Jacobsen (van Kuykendall) leasing a farm in Marbletown, NY in 1681.

      The Minisink Chronicles, by Gene Kuykendall Published in the February, 1977 issue of New Netherland Connections. Labeled as the Montague Town Records, these old journals of 1634-1682 actually contain records of the old Mnisink Precinct encompassing parts of Sussex Co., NJ amd Orange Co., NY and settled by primarily Dutch families including the K-Family. These early records, hand written in both Dutch and English, were transcribed in 1960 but then became effectively lost and forgotten until rediscovered in 1996 by researchers Brian Westfall and Alicia Batkos. They have since been compiled with some corrections and additional translations and indexed and Gene Kuykendall for submission to selected society libraries. Pieter Kuykendall and Solomon Kuykendall are listed among the Precinct officers.

      Dutch Settlement Patterns Reflected by the Founding of Dutch Reformed Churches, 1623-1800, by Eugene L. Kuykendall, Holland Society of New York, de Halve-Maen, Summer 1996. This article traces primarily the migration path of the Kuykendall and related families.
    Person ID I2525  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 9 Aug 2018 

    Father Jacob LUURSZEN,   b. Abt 1616, Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 29 Apr 1655, Beverwijck, New Netherland [now Albany, Albany County, NY] Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 39 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Stijntje DOUWES,   b. Abt 22 Jan 1617, Enkhuisen, Noord-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1682, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 66 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married Abt 28 Aug 1638  Reformed Dutch Church, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1826  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Grietje Aertze TACK,   b. Bef 16 Aug 1663, Kingston, Ulster County, NY [originally named Wiltwyck, later Esopus] Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1720, Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 58 years) 
    Married Abt 1681  Kingston, Ulster County, NY [originally named Wiltwyck, later Esopus] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Pieter VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 1 May 1698, Rochester, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1778, Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 79 years)  [natural]
     2. Arie VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 8 Jun 1694, Rochester, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1759, Northampton County, PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 64 years)  [natural]
     3. Annetje VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 19 May 1700, Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Seytie VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 27 Oct 1706, Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     5. Sara VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 14 Jun 1702, Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     6. Matheus VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Abt 1690, Rochester, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1754, Anson County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 64 years)  [natural]
     7. Jacob VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 12 Aug 1683, Marbletown, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1741 and 1744, Hunterdon County, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 57 years)  [natural]
     8. Styntie VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 2 Apr 1682, Marbletown, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1715, Deerpark [formerly Machackemeck], Orange County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 32 years)  [natural]
     9. Johannes VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 20 Apr 1685, Marbletown, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1685 and 1688, Marbletown, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     10. Johannes VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 30 Sep 1688, Marbletown, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1711, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 22 years)  [natural]
     11. Cornelius VAN KUYKENDALL,   b. Bef 30 May 1686, Marbletown, Ulster County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1752, Warren County, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 67 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 9 Aug 2018 11:01:14 
    Family ID F1816  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart