First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Fannie MORGAN

Female Abt 1861 - 1936  (~ 75 years)


Personal Information    |    PDF

  • Name Fannie MORGAN 
    Born Abt 1861  IA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Name Fannie FROST 
    Died 25 Nov 1936  Topeka State Hospital, Topeka, Shawnee County, KS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Topeka State Hospital Cemetery, Topeka, Shawnee County, KS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 

    • (1) Fannie MORGAN is listed in a household headed by her mother, Ellen MORGAN, in the 1870 census of Sherman Township, Putnam County, MO, next to households headed by William FROST and Isaac FROST.

      Fannie MORGAN is listed in the 1870 census as a person who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1861. According to the 1870 census, she was born in IA.

      (2) In the obituary of Fannie's step-father, William FROST, who died in 1903, the following two surviving daughters of his marriage to Ellen MORGAN are mentioned: "Mrs. James Shirley, and . . . Nanni Frost." [Nanni/Nannie was the nickname of Nancy P. FROST, and should not be confused with Fannie.] No daughter of William who was named Fannie is mentioned in William's obituary.

      (3) A household headed by Fannie BRADSHAW is listed in the 1910 census of Ward 3, Woodward, Woodward County, OK.

      Fannie is listed in the 1910 census as a laundress who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1861. According to the 1910 census, she was born in IA, and both of her parents were born in IA. According to the 1910 census, she had then been married 19 years and had theretofore given birth to 4 children, 3 of whom were then living. Although she was reportedly married at the time of the 1910 census, her husband was not then in her household, and only 2 of her children were then in her household.

      Listed with Fannie is her son, Austin, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1898. According to the 1910 census, he was born in MO, his father was born in MO, and his mother was born in IA. [The compiler believes that Austin BRADSHAW was really Osten BRADSHAW.]

      Also listed with Fannie is her daughter, Bessie, who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1902. According to the 1910 census, she was born in IA, her father was born in MO, and her mother was born in IA.

      (4) The following information about Fannie BRADSHAW appears in the 1915 IA state census of Des Moines, Polk County, IA:

      Name: Fannie Bradshaw
      Birth Year: abt 1860
      Birth Place: Iowa
      Gender: Female
      Race: White
      Marital Status: Widowed
      Census Date: 1915
      Residence State: Iowa
      Residence County: Polk
      Locality: Des Moines
      Mother's Birthplace: Iowa
      Father's Birthplace: Iowa
      Roll: IA1915_391
      Line: m110
      Neighbors: View others on page
      Household Members: Name Age
      Fannie Bradshaw 55

      (5) Fannie/Fanny BRADSHAW was living at 1221 Osage Avenue, Kansas City, Wyandotte County, KS on September 12, 1918 when her sons, Walter William BRADSHAW and Osten Cafey BRADSHAW, executed their World War I draft registration cards, listing her as their nearest relative.

      (6) In the obituary of Fannie's mother, Ellen (MORGAN) FROST, who died in 1919, the following three surviving daughters of hers are mentioned: "Mrs. Fannie Bradshaw of Kansas City[, Kansas]; Mrs. Allie Shirley of Unionville, Missouri; . . . [and] Mrs. Nannie Korns of near Unionville."

      (7) Fannie's step-father and mother, William FROST and Ellen (MORGAN) FROST, had a son named William M. FROST, who died in 1922. In William M. FROST's obituary, the following three surviving sisters of his are mentioned: "Nannie Korns and Allie Shirley, both of Unionville, Mo., [and] Fannie Bradshaw . . . of Oklahoma."

      (8) It therefore appears that Mrs. Fannie BRADSHAW was not a daughter of William FROST, but was instead a daughter of Mrs. Ellen (MORGAN) FROST from a prior relationship.

      (9) A household headed by Fannie BRADSHAW is listed in the 1920 census of Lincoln Township, Blaine County, OK.

      Fannie is listed in the 1920 census as a single person who was then 59 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1861. According to the 1920 census, she was born in IA, her father was born in the United States, and her mother was born in IA.

      Listed with Fannie is her son, Walter, a farmer who was then 38 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1882. According to the 1920 census, he was born in MO, and both of his parents were born in IA.

      Also listed with Fannie is her daughter, Bessie, who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1902. According to the 1920 census, she was born in IA, and both of her parents were born in IA.

      (10) www.findagrave.com:

      Fannie Bradshaw
      Birth: Unknown
      Death: Nov. 25, 1936

      Burial: Topeka State Hospital Cemetery, Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, USA
      Plot: Row 12 Grave 67

      Created by: marge
      Record added: Jul 03, 2006
      Find A Grave Memorial# 14809972

      (1) http://cjonline.com/stories/011700/com_tshlegacy17.shtml:

      Topeka State leaves mixed legacy

      By MIKE HALL
      The Capital-Journal
      Published Monday, January 17, 2000

      At times in its history, Topeka State Hospital was at the leading edge of treatment of the mentally ill. At other times, the term "snakepit" was used to describe it.

      There were horror stories from the early 1900s about patients being abused, neglected - and even raped.

      One newspaper reporter told of seeing a patient who had been confined in leather straps so long, the skin was growing around the straps. A common sight during those dark ages was patients sitting in rocking chairs in the hallways all day long, with no opportunity for other activity.

      Some claimed having the patients work in the large garden areas during the day was therapeutic for them; others said they were used as slave labor to keep the hospital's food costs down.

      A major reform begun in 1948 produced rapid improvement in conditions at TSH, limited frequently by a lack of funding from the state government.

      The hospital finally was closed when modern medications and other treatments reduced the need for hospitalization for many people with mental disorders. For those still requiring in-hospital care, the state kept open its mental hospitals at Osawatomie and Larned.

      A number of documents in the Topeka Room at the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library describe TSH's history. One is a book by Barbara Hauschild called "On the Avenue of Approach," published in 1979.

      She wrote that the Legislature appropriated $25,000 in 1875 "for the purpose of building an asylum for the insane at some convenient and healthy spot within two miles of the state capitol building in the city of Topeka."

      One condition was that the land would be acquired at no cost to the state. So the city of Topeka and Shawnee County each contributed $6,000 to purchase the original 80 acres.

      The first two ward buildings, accommodating 135 patients, opened in 1879. Dr. Barnard Douglass Eastman resigned as superintendent of the asylum at Worcester, Mass., to become the first superintendent at TSH.

      The institution was called the Topeka Insane Asylum until 1901 when the Legislature officially changed the name to Topeka State Hospital.

      Eastman told legislators that patients who were being released to make room for more patients were "well enough to be in a measure useful. All were of a quiet and harmless character."

      He described the treatment process this way: "Removal from the worriment, the overwork, the unsanitary conditions and the unsuitable food of many homes . . . occupying body and mind in the new employment, cheering the drooping and melancholy and soothing the excited and irritable, are some of the elements of treatment of the greatest value, sometimes working rapid cures with but little medication."

      Patients who were able did useful work around the asylum during the day, constructing new buildings, working on the farm or sewing.

      Patients were admitted to the asylum only by court order. Eastman objected to such demeaning insanity trials, saying "The insane are sick, not criminal."

      But the policy didn't change until 1919. The Legislature allowed shell-shocked veterans of World War I to be treated at TSH without the indignity of an insanity trial.

      An alarm arose in 1948 over the deplorable conditions at TSH, caused by such factors as reduced expenditures by the state and a shortage of psychiatrists, psychologists and other professional personnel.

      Legal commitment papers couldn't be found for some of the patients, and some patients couldn't even be accurately identified. Many patients still were being admitted as a result of the legal process and weren't having their actual mental conditions evaluated by hospital officials. Patients were sometimes kept chained and nude for months or even years.

      Gov. Frank Carlson appointed a five-member panel to study the situation. After the committee released its report in October 1948, the Legislature doubled the appropriations for mental hospitals, made TSH a training center for psychiatric personnel and implemented other changes.

      The practice of placing patients in rocking chairs in the hallways during the daytime was discontinued. Incidents of patient mistreatment were investigated and corrected.

      Psychiatrists from the Menninger Foundation volunteered some of their own time to examine patients, and Menninger psychologists helped organize a department of psychology at TSH.

      In 1949, the first social worker was hired. She began the first discharge plans for patients who were deemed ready for release. Social workers and volunteers often had to acquaint patients with modern household appliances that didn't exist when they were admitted.

      Patients first were able to receive outpatient treatment at TSH in 1951. In subsequent years, the professional staff was increased, including physicians and dentists to treat physical ailments. In 1951, a fully equipped operating room was created.

      Conditions began to deteriorate again about 1958 because of state funding cutbacks. Staff salaries fell seriously behind salaries offered elsewhere, and experienced staff members were leaving. The good news was that the use of tranquilizing drugs was proving effective on a large percentage of the patients.

      By 1968, TSH was back at the leading edge again, at least in terms of how to run a mental hospital. An organization plan, called "The Kansas Plan," was being used as a model for organizing other institutions around the country.

      It included treatment, research, training and consultation to the communities it served.

      But in 1988, the hospital lost its accreditation to receive federal Medicare and Medicaid payments.

      By the 1990s, the mental health movement was away from the hospital model and toward community-based programs.

      Partly because the community-based model appeared effective and partly because it was cheaper, the Kansas Legislature decided to close one of its three mental hospitals. TSH was chosen for closing and went out of business May 17, 1997.
    Person ID I22860  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 12 Nov 2017 

    Mother Ellen MORGAN,   b. 30 Mar 1842, Lee County, IA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jul 1919, Putnam County, MO Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F1020  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family James BRADSHAW,   d. Bef 1915 
    Married Bef 18 Jul 1881 
    Children 
     1. Bessie BRADSHAW,   b. Abt 1902  [natural]
     2. Osten Cafey BRADSHAW,   b. 5 Sep 1897, MO Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. Walter William BRADSHAW,   b. 18 Jul 1881, Putnam County, MO Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 12 Nov 2017 22:51:11 
    Family ID F10062  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart