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William PENN, Jr.

Male 1680 - 1720  (40 years)


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  • Name William PENN 
    Suffix Jr. 
    Born 14 Mar 1680  Warminghurst, Sussex,England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    AFN P20M-J7 
    Name William PENN Jr. 
    Died 23 Jun 1720  Li??ge, Li??ge, Wallonia, Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Tuberculosis 
    Notes 

    • (1) Roach, Hannah Benner, "The Family of William Penn-A Collated Record," Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 25, No. 2, 1967, pp. 83-84:

      WILLIAM PENN, JR., sixth child of the Founder by his first wife, Gulielma Maria Springett, was born at Warminghurst 14 1m (March) 1680/1, ten days after his father's grant from Charles II. He was not quite eighteen when he married at Bristol, according to Friends' ceremony, on 12 11m (January) 1698/9, MARY JONES, born 11 11m (January) 1676/7, daughter of Charles Jones, Jr. of Bristol, and his wife Martha Wathers. As a marriage settlement, William Penn, Sr. apparently made over to young William the Irish estate of Shanagarry in Cork, entailing it on his male heirs. In 1666, the estate reputedly was worth ??1000 a year. On his mother's death in 1694, Warminghurst in Sussex had become his by inheritance from her, and on young William's marriage, he and his wife appear to have taken up residence there, his father and stepmother moving to Bristol.

      William Penn, Jr. came to Philadelphia without his wife, arriving 2 February 1703/4, with John Evans, commissioned Lieutenant Governor by the Founder. His stay was not a success and was brief. After disposing of some of the Pennsylvania land given him by his father, he was back in England by mid-January, 1704/5. He and his wife lived at Warminghurst until it was sold in 1707, then apparently rented properties until his father's death in 1718. He unsuccessfully essayed a political career in seeking a seat in Parliament, and appears to have left the upbringing and expenses of his children to his stepmother. In 1719, he made an unsuccessful attempt to get the Pennsylvania Assembly to acknowledge his claim as chief Proprietor and heir-at-law. Irresponsible and unstable, he apparently died in Li??ge, Belgium 23 June 1720, reputedly of a consumption. His widow Mary Jones was buried at Jordans 5 10m (December) 1733.

      Issue of . . . William Penn, Jr. and his wife Mary Jones:

      i. GULIELMA MARIA PENN, b. at Warminghurst 10 9m (November) 1699; d. probably in London, 17 11m (January) 1739/40, bur. 22 January 1739/40, at St. Margaret's Church, Westminster; m. 1st, at St. Mary Magdalen Church, Fish Street, London, 14 February 1720, AUBREY THOMAS, b. in Pennsylvania 30 11m (January) 1694, son of Rees and Martha Thomas; d. before 1724, issue: 1. WILLIAM PENN THOMAS, d. unmarried ca. 1742. She m. 2nd, CHARLES FELL, d. at Windsor 1 October 1748, son of Charles Fell; administration on his estate was granted in London 17 October 1748 to his son Robert. Issue: 2. MARY MARGARETTA FELL, bapt. 23 August 1725; dec'd by 1740; m. JOHN BARRON of Leeds, Yorkshire who in 1774
      was of Philadelphia. 3. GULIELMA MARIA FRANCES TELL, bapt. 10 August 1725; living in Shrewsbury, County Salop, in March, 1769; m., by 26 May 1750, JOHN NEWCOMB of Leir, Glos.; dec'd by March, 1769, 4. ROBERT EDWARD FELL, bapt. 29 November 1726; d. testate in Bordentown, N.J., in November, 1786. Both Robert Fell and John Barron came to Philadelphia about 1769 to take up and sell holdings which had descended to Gulielma Maria (Penn) Fell under the will of her grandfather.

      ii. SPRINGETT PENN, b. at Warminghurst 10 12m (February) 1700/1 ; said to have d. in Dublin, Ireland, either 30 December 1730, or 8 February 1731, unmarried and without issue. By his father's death he considered himself heir-at-law of the American estates of his grandfather at of the Proprietorship, and unsuccessfully challenged both the will and the apportionment made by his stepmother Hannah Fenn, as noted previously.

      9. iii. WILLIAM PENN, 3rd, b. at Warminghurst 21 1m (March) 1702/3; d. at Shanagarry, Ireland, 6 12m (February) 1746/7. . . .

      (2) Jenkins, Howard M., The Family of William Penn, Founder of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA & London, England: H.M. Jenkins, Headley Bros., 1899, pp. 106-129:

      WILLIAM PENN, JUNIOR.

      Of the children of William Penn by his marriage to Gulielma Maria Springett, only two, as we have already seen, married, and one of these, Letitia Aubrey, had no children. The other was William Penn, Jr., and from him is derived one of the two existing lines of the Penn family.

      William Penn, Jr., was born at Worminghurst, his mother's estate, March 14, 1680/1, ten days after the grant of Pennsylvania to his father. Little is known of his childhood and youth. His father's letter to him, before sailing in the "Welcome," has been given. He was married early. The Bristol Friends' records show the marriage of William Penn, Jr., and Mary Jones, daughter of Charles, Jr., and Martha, at Bristol, on the 12th of Eleventh month (January), 1698/9. He was then not quite eighteen years old. His wife was four years older. She was born on the 11th of Eleventh month (January), 1676/7, and was, therefore, just a day more than twenty-two on her wedding-day.

      The marriage certificate is as follows:

      [The memoriall or Copy of the Certificate of Willm Penn Junr. & Mary Jones's Marriage. The Certificate itselfe being made on double Stampt pchment according to the late Statute.]

      Whereas it doth appeare by the memorialls of the men's meeting of the people called Quakers within the Citty of Bristoll that William Penn, son of Willm. Penn Esq and Mary Jones daughter of Charles Jones Junr. of the same Citty, merchant, did on the four & twentieth day of the eighth month last past manifest their intentions of marriage. AND WHEREAS such their intentions was on the eighteenth day of the ninth month last published in the publique meeting house of the said people in the presence of many people there congregated AND FORASMUCH as there appeares no just cause wherefore a marriage between the said William Penn Junr. & Mary Jones should not be consumated we therefore whose names are hereunto subscribed are witnesses that on the day of the date hereof the said Willm. Penn Junr. taking the said Mary Jones by the hand did declare that he did take the said Mary to be his wife, And that the said Mary holding the said Willm. Penn Junr. by the hand did declare that she did take the said Willm. to be her husband, And that also the said Willm. Penn Junr. & Mary holding each other by the hand did mutually promise each to other to live together husband and wife in love and faithfulnes according to God's Holy ordinances as in Holy scriptures declared untill by death they shall be separated AND ALSO the said Willm. and Mary as a further testimony of such their taking each other and of such their promises each to other have hereunto with us sett their hands the Twleveth day of the eleaventh month in the year one thousand six hundred ninety eight.

      WILL. PENN Jur.
      MARY PENN.

      The names of the Witnesses that subscribed with them to the same Certificate are-

      Walter Duffield
      Thomas Penn
      J. Hampton
      Isaac Jenings
      Tho. Callowhill
      Charles Harford
      Richd. Snead
      Wm. Stafford
      Robt. Bound
      Paul Moore
      Benj: Coole
      Charles Jones
      Anne Jones
      Margt. Lowther
      Letitia Penn
      Hannah Penn
      Ch: Jones Jun
      Edw: Hackett
      J. Dooer
      Lidia Hacket Junr.
      Margret Lowther Junr.
      Eliz: Corshey
      Richard Rooth
      Marget. Rooth
      Jane Trahear
      Danll. Pill
      Ffra: Roath
      Peter Young
      Martha Jones
      Eliz: Jones
      Anthony Lowther
      Sarah Roath
      Eliz: Harford
      Jane Watkins
      William Penn
      Nathll. Wade
      Ffra: Whitchurch
      Wm. Cluterbuck Snr.
      Richard Codrington
      Wm. Coplin
      Henh. Swymmer
      Richd. Taylour. Junr.
      John Corshey
      Edw: Jones
      Katherne Bound

      [Certified to be an Extract from the Register or Record numbered Society of Friends 116, and entitled a Register of Marriages formerly kept by the Society of Friends at the Monthly Meeting of Bristol.-From the General Register Office, Somerset House, London.]

      Charles Jones, Jr., father of Mary Penn, was the son of Charles and Ann Jones, of Redcliffe Street, Bristol, who were among the early Friends in that city. The name of Charles Jones appears in Besse's record of the "Sufferings" of Bristol Friends in 1663 and later. The son, Charles, Jr., was probably born prior to 1654; the Friends' records show seven other children born to his parents between that year and 1664. Charles, Jr., married, 1674, Martha Wathers, and she dying First month (March) 8, 1687/8, he married again, 1695, Sarah Corsley, widow. He died, it seems, from William Penn's letters cited below, about January, 1701/2. By his first wife he had several children, including Mary (Penn), who appears to have been the second child.

      When William Penn sailed for Pennsylvania, in 1699, he left his son behind. "William [Junior] . . . and . . . his young wife chose to remain in England," Maria Webb says. Their first child, Gulielma Maria, and their second, Springett, were born during the two years of William Penn's absence. In the latter's correspondence with Logan, after his return to England, there are numerous allusions to William, Jr., and his family. Thus:

      [Kensington, 4th of Eleventh month (January), 1701/2:] "My son and family well; a sweet girl and a Saracen of a boy; his wife-a good and pretty woman-at Bristol on her father's account, who is dead and buried."

      [Kensington, 3d of Twelfth month (February), 1701/2:] "Son and wife at Bristol upon C. Jones's death. I send a packet to thee that was from him. . . . The three daughters I think, or son and wife, administer. All amicable among the relatives."

      In a letter to Logan, from Worminghurst, August 18, 1702, William Penn, Jr., thanks him for informing him of some "base and scandalous reports" which had come to Logan's ears concerning him, and adds,-

      "I hope you will be assured I am far different. . . . I love my friends, keep company that is not inferior to myself, and never am anything to excess. My dress is all they can complain of, and that but decently genteel, without extravagancy; and as for the poking-iron I never had courage enough to wear one by my side. You will oblige me if you give this character of me till I make my personal appearance among you, which shall not be long, God willing. . . ."

      [Postscript:]

      "My children are, I thank God, both well, and remember to thee. The boy is a jolly fellow, able to make two of his uncle already."

      William Penn's letters to Logan contain these passages:

      [London, 6th of Fourth month, 1703:] "My son has another boy, mine and his name."

      [Another letter, about the same time as above:] "My son (having life) resolves to be with you per first opportunity. His wife this day week was delivered of a fine boy, as I found when I came home in the evening, and which he has called William, so we are now major, minor, and minimus . . . my grandson Springett a mere Saracen, his sister a beauty."

      William Penn, Jr., came to Pennsylvania in company with Lieutenant-Governor John Evans in February, 1703/4. It had been a cherished plan of his father's to send him to the new country, to get him out of undesirable company at home, and to let him acquire the knowledge of a simpler and more moderate way of living. The young man's letter to Logan in August, 1702, already cited, shows that he was expecting to come soon, and the visit had evidently been resolved upon considerably earlier. February 4,1701/2, Penn, Sen., had written to Logan, from Kensington, suggesting how he should manage the young man when he came:

      "My son shall hasten; possess him, go with him to Pennsbury, advise him, contract, and recommend his acquaintance. No rambling to New York, nor mongrel correspondence. He has promised fair; I know he will regard thee. . . . Be discreet; he has wit, kept the top company, and must be handled with much love and wisdom; and urging the weakness or folly of some behaviors, and the necessity of another conduct from interest and reputation, will go far . . . he is conquered that way, pretends much to honor, and is but over-generous by half, and yet sharp enough to get to spend. He cannot well be put on. All this keep to thyself."

      In a letter February 24, 1702/3, Penn spoke of his son's departure having been delayed by reports of sickness at Philadelphia, as well as his-the son's-wife's approaching confinement (expected in six weeks). And in another letter whose date is missing, but presumed to be about the same time, Penn writes to Logan,-

      "Immediately take him away to Pennsbury, and there give him the true state of things, and weigh down his levities, as well as temper his resentments and inform his understandings, since all depends upon it, as well for his future happiness, as in measure your poor country's. I propose Governor Hamilton, S. Carpenter, I. Norris, young Shippen, and your easiest and most sensible and civilized for his conversation; and I hope Col. Markham, and Cousin Ashton, and the Fairmans may come in for a share; but the first chiefly. Watch him, outwit him, and honestly overreach him for his good; fishing, little journeys (as to see the Indians), &c., will divert him; and pray Friends to bear all they can, and melt toward him, at least civilly if not religiously. He will confide in thee. If S. Carpenter, R. Hill, and Is. Norris could gain his confidence, and honest and tender G. Owen not the least likely, (for he feels and sees), I should rejoice. Pennsylvania has cost me dearer in my poor child than all other considerations."

      Governor Evans and young Penn left England, probably in the early autumn of 1703, and had a long voyage. A letter, dated at London, December 4, 1703, from Penn to Logan, asks him to "tell my poor boy that all his were well the last post . . . per next packet boat to Barbadoes, a month hence, he will hear from his wife." Three days later, "7th 10br," probably also from London, Penn again wrote to Logan,-

      "My son's going did not cost me so little as ??800, and the land he left destitute of stock at Worminghurst, with the taxes becoming due at his going off, with carpenter's [bills] etc., makes 200 more, and thou mayst imagine how hard it is for me to get it, Ireland so miserably drained and reduced as it is, an account of which I had to-night, at my lodgings from Sir Francis Brewster's own mouth. . . . Let my dear child have my endeared love. The Lord direct his ways for his honor, his father's comfort, and his own peace."

      William, Jr., had been living, it is evident from this letter as well as other evidence, at Worminghurst. It is probable that he had removed there at his marriage. During his absence in Pennsylvania his father apparently went there, and may have made the place his home. He says, in a letter, 31st December, a short time after that last cited, "A Scotch plot [and other circumstances] allow me a few days at Worminghurst for my better health and refreshment."

      Evans and young Penn reached Philadelphia February 2, 1703/4. A letter from Isaac Norris to Samuel Chew, dated "12th of 12th month" (February), says, "The Governor and W. Penn, junior, caught us napping; they arrived late at night, unheard to all the town, and at a time when we were big with the expectation of a Queen's governor." A letter from Logan to Penn, Sen., dated at Philadelphia, Twelfth month (February) 15, contains evidence that the voyage had been unusually long. He says,-

      "I leave the account of the tedious voyage. . . . By thy son . . . I received thine of the 27th 6th mo. [August] . . . Thy son's voyage I hope will prove to the satisfaction of all, and to his, and therefore thy happiness. It is his stock of excellent good nature that in a measure has led him out into his youthful sallies when too easily prevailed upon. . . . He is very well received . . . 'tis his good fortune here to be withdrawn from those temptations that have been too successful over his natural sweetness and yielding temper."

      Penn writes to Logan from London, on the 10th of First month (March), 1703/4,-

      "Tell my son I met my wife" and his at young S. Tilley's marriage, near Guilford, and then they were well; and by two letters since their return. Guly and Springett are well from their agues, and little Billy so too and the spark of them all; and my poor little ones also well, and great love among the children."

      Hannah Penn writes to Logan from Bristol, 5th of Eighth month (October), 1704,-

      "I am very glad our son likes the country [Pennsylvania] so well: and has his health so well there. 'Tis in vain to wish, or it should be, that he had seen that country sooner (or his father not so soon). . . . With this comes a letter from his wife, so that I need say the less of her, only that herself and the three pretty children are well for aught I hear."

      Penn writes to Logan from Bristol, on the 2d of November, 1704,-

      "If my son prove very expensive I cannot bear it, but must place to his account what he spends above moderation, while I lie loaded with debt at interest here, else I shall pay dear for the advantage his going thither might entitle me to, since the subscribers are [or?] bondsmen cannot make ready pay, according to what he has received, and on his land there. So excite his return, or to send for his family to him; for if he brings not wherewith to pay his debts here, his creditors will fall foul upon him most certainly."

      The young man's stay in Philadelphia lasted only a few months; the reproaches, just or unjust, which attended it are familiar in our local history of the time. Upon his arrival, he and James Logan boarded a while at Isaac Norris's, and then, in June, took William Clark's "great house,"newly built, on Chestnut Street at the southwest corner of Third, where they kept "bachelors' hall" and where later Governor Evans joined them. Young Penn would not adjust his expenditure to the allowance-apparently very moderate-which Logan was authorized to pay him. His outlay was, the latter reported to Penn, "much above the limits set me. The directions given me can by no means satisfy him, nor answer what is thought suitable the presumptive heir of the Province." Logan was a clean and temperate liver; he had, no doubt, little satisfaction in the direction which young Penn and the Governor were inclined to take, but his performance of his duty in the premises was not remitted. Like many men of his race, he was a faithful and exact administrator.

      Young Penn was made, immediately upon his arrival, a member of the Provincial Council. The minutes show that at the meeting February 8,1703/4, "William Penn, Junr., ye Propr's Son, was called to ye Board & took the affirmation of a member of Council." He was thereafter occasionally present at the meetings, and in the list of those attending his name was placed at the top, next following that of the Lieutenant-Governor. His last attendance appears to have been September 15, 1704. He was promptly taken also, as his father had suggested, to Pennsbury, and a meeting with the Indians was held. Logan says, in a letter dated 14th of First month (March), that the preceding week, Penn, Jr., himself, and Judge Mompesson "went to Pennsbury to meet one hundred Indians, of which nine were kings. Oppewounumhook, the chief, with his neighbors who came thither to congratulate thy son's arrival, presented nine belts of wampum for a ratification of peace, &c., and had returns [of presents] accordingly. He [W. P., Jr.] stayed there with the judge, waiting Clement Plumstead's wedding with Sarah Righton, formerly Biddle." But the social life of Philadelphia was undoubtedly dull, seen from the standpoint of a young man who had tasted and enjoyed dissipation in England. The hopeful experiment of reformation through exile was doomed to failure. In July, Isaac Norris wrote to Jonathan Dickinson, "Our young proprietor seems to like the country, and talks of fetching his family; but by endeavoring to sell off all of his lands, he must give me leave to think otherwise. He goes to no other worship [than the Friends'] and sometimes comes to meeting. He is good-natured, and loves company, but that of Friends is too dull." Norris was in a position to know of the young man's desire to sell his lands, for the purchase of the manor of Williamstadt-seven thousand four hundred and eighty acres, on the Schuylkill-had been pressed upon him by the young man. He and William Trent finally bought the manor, and remembrance of Isaac Norris is preserved in the name of the borough, Norristown, now a city in size and population, built upon it, and also in the name, Norriton, of the township adjoining.

      Two months later, Isaac Norris, writing again to Jonathan Dickinson, reported the occurrence which put a climax upon the young man's stay in the little Quaker town. A sharp conflict between Governor Evans and the Friends was already established, and Norris says "their attempts to discourage vice, looseness, and immorality,-which increase,-are baffled by proclamations [from the Governor] making void their presentations" (from the mayor's court). Then he adds,-

      "William Penn, junior, quite gone off from Friends. He, being in company with some extravagants that beat the watch at Enoch Story's, was presented with them: which unmannerly and disrespectful act, as he takes it, gives him great disgust, and seems a waited occasion. He talks of going home in the Jersey man-of-war, next month. I wish things had been better, or he had never come."

      "Enoch Story's" was a tavern, a drinking-place, with the sign of the Pewter-Platter, in Coombe's Alley, the resort, it would appear, of the "men about town." The story of the occurrence to which Isaac Norris alludes is variously told, but the main facts were that a party were drinking at Story's one evening, and that a dispute arose, and a fracas followed, in which young Penn and others were involved. The watchmen (who were citizens serving on this duty, a night at a time) came in, and in their effort to restore order were beaten themselves, and gave some severe blows in return. The affair was "taken notice of" in the mayor's court (then comparatively young, established under the city charter of 1701), but action was suppressed before the grand jury, according to the statement of Logan in a letter to Penn, Sen., on the 28th of September, Governor Evans exerting himself to prevent any further publicity or prosecution. But, as Isaac Norris said in the letter to Jonathan Dickinson, young Penn was mortally affronted. He had regarded himself evidently as the future ruler of the Colony, the prince imperial, the heir-apparent, and as entitled to indulge his humor in a performance like that at Story's, if he wished. The idea that he was to be treated as other persons was too humiliating to be endured. He accordingly broke with the Quakers at once, ceased to attend their meetings, and attached himself to the company of Lord Cornbury, Governor of New York and New Jersey, who about this time was visiting the Delaware. Logan says In the letter already cited,-

      "He is just now returned from Pennsbury, where he entertained the Lord and Lady Cornbury, and what we could not believe before, though for a few days past he has discoursed of it, assures us that he is resolved to go home from York in Jersey man-of-war, and within a week at farthest designs to set off from this place."

      The young man did so return. He sailed in the "Jersey" (some time in November, probably), and was never again seen at Philadelphia. It had been an unfortunate visit. He had injured not only himself, but his father, and added strength to the partly democratic and just, partly factional and unfair, opposition to the Proprietary interest. Logan wrote regretfully and pathetically in a letter to Penn, from New Castle, on the 8th of December,-

      "'Tis a pity his wife came not with him; there is scarce any thing has a worse effect upon his mind than the belief thou hast a greater regard to thy second children than thy first, and an emulation between his own and thy younger seems too much to him in it, which, were it obviated by the best methods, might be of service, for he is and must be thy son, and thou either happy or unhappy in him. The tie is indissoluble."

      The voyage in the "Jersey" was rough, as was natural for a crossing of the Atlantic in a sailing-ship of 1704, in midwinter. In a long, sad, almost sobbing letter from Penn to Logan, dated at London, on the 16th of January, these passages occur:

      ". . . as for Guy no news yet; but my son, who has come safe, though near foundering in the Jersey, says he believes she [Guy's brig] is lost, for after the storm they saw her no more . . . nor didst thou send me word what my son sold his manor for; but after all he drew a bill for ??10 at his arrival, to ride 200 miles home, and which he performed in two days and a night. I met him by appointment between this and Worminghurst; stayed but three hours together."

      [Earlier passage in the letter:] "The Lord uphold me under these sharp and heavy burdens. . . . I should have been glad of an account of his [W. P., Jr.'s] expenses, and more of a rent-roll, that I may know what I have to stand upon, and help myself with. He is my greatest affliction for my soul's and my posterity's or family's sake."

      Upon his return to England, young Penn endeavored to begin a public career. His father, in a letter from London (dated at Hyde Park), on the 30th of April, 1705, speaks of his own troubles, and adds, "with my poor son's going into the army or navy, as well as getting into Parliament," etc. A little later, May 10, he says,-

      "My son has lost his election, as also the Lord-Keeper's son-in-law, but both hope to recover it by proving bribery upon the two that have it, Lord Windsor and Squire Arsgell. I wish it might turn his face to privacy, and good husbandry, if not nearer to us."

      Apparently the nearing of relation did not occur. The young man found his wings too weak for the flights he proposed, and was soon in straits for money, which his father in his own financial stress could not supply. Penn, Jr., wrote to Logan after his return, asking for help:

      "You must believe I cannot live here about a court without expenses which my attendance occasions, and I must own to you I was never so pinched in my life, wherefore must beg you to endeavor all you can to send over my effects with all speed you possibly can. . . . I hear the prosecution against me still continues, and that they have outlawed me upon it: I have complained to my father, who tells me he has and will now write about it, and that I shall have right done me in it, which I do expect at your hands, I mean at the Quakers', who are the people that have given me this affront. . . . as my honor has been injured, I am resolved to have justice done me, or run all hazards, without consideration to relation, friend, or interest in the country.

      "I desire you, if possible, to sell the remainder of my land there, before you send over, and make what returns you can. . . .

      "P.S.-Pray put Isaac Norris and William Trent in mind of their promise to send me over a pipe of old Madeira, which I shall take kindly. My father has promised me to write you about my charges there. If there be any extravagant ones, I am to bear them; but as to that of books, pocket money, and clothes, with the charges of going and returning, he will allow."

      The young man apparently resumed his residence at Worminghurst upon returning to England. In a letter to Logan from London, 8th of Fifth month (July), 1707, at the time his own affairs were approaching their worst, Penn, Sen., wrote,-

      ". . . Depend upon it, if God favors me and my son with life, one, if not both will come as soon as possible. Worminghurst he has at last resigned for sale; so that having conquered himself and his wife too, who has cost me more money than she brought by her unreasonable, and for that reason imprudent obstinacy for dwelling there, to which she could have no pretence, either by family or portion, but by being my son's impetuous inclination; and I wish she had brought more wisdom, since she brought so little money, to help the family. Worminghurst, with some land to be sold in Ireland, about ??45 per annum, will lighten his load as well as mine; for his marriage, and my daughter's [Letitia's] too, have not helped me,-his to be sure, more especially. We are entering, or it seems likely we should, into nearer friendship than before, he knowing the world and duty to a father better; for he has been of no use, but much grief and expense to me many ways and years too, losing him before I found him, being not of that service and benefit to me that some sons are, and 'tis well known I was to my father before I married. But oh, if yet he will recommend himself, and show himself a good child and a true Friend, I shall be pleased, and leave the world with less concern for him and the rest also."

      Isaac Norris, then in England, aiding in the settlement of Penn's affairs, and judiciously explaining to people there the nature of the controversies in Pennsylvania, in a letter to "his relations," on November 4 (1707), said, "Worminghurst, that has been these many years a charge, and little profit, is sold well, and many debts are paid off by bills on Pennsylvania. Some Friends have been industrious in this, that if that of Ford's should go against him, his and his friends' reputations may stand the clearer, having nothing but that unreasonable debt against him."

      And four days later, writing to Logan, Norris adds,-

      "Worminghurst is sold well, and thou wilt see bills to a considerable value. I have been persuaded to negotiate one, I think the largest, viz.; William Backfield's for ??608. I have sent it to brother [Samuel] Preston for acceptance. I understand he [Buckfield] has been an old servant and friend of the Governor, and the debt has been ready money lent, and to do it [lend to Penn] has dipt into a little estate of his own . . . several of the Governor's friends, tho' they would have all done honorably, yet seem to be more particularly in care for him than others [creditors]. I request thee, therefore, to put good bonds into hand."

      After his father's apoplectic seizure, in 1712, William Penn, Jr., seems to have left his family very much-but probably not altogether-to the care of Hannah Penn. The cash-book kept at Ruscombe, as has been mentioned, contains three pages of items of money advanced on their account by Hannah Penn between September, 1712, and October, 1717, the whole amount being about three hundred pounds. In Twelfth month, 1712, ten pounds was "paid Thos. Overton for their house-rent." In 1713 there are payments "for fitting the children," "expence at the Children's going to school," eight pounds "paid Alice Hays for Daughter's and Guli's board," cash " paid Gill. Thomson for Springett and Bille's board," cash paid for "Daughter's and Guly's board to December," etc., and cash to William Penn, Jr., to pay "his note due to Cousin Rooth," twenty-five pounds. Payments for board for "Daughter" and for the children continue each year down to 1717. The last entry of the account is cash paid "S. Arnold for Guly's last half year's board & necessaries at Richard Wildman's."

      The will which William Penn the Founder made in 1701, at New Castle, Delaware, as he was about sailing on his return to England, and which was left behind in the care of James Logan, bestowed the Proprietorship and Governorship on William Penn, Jr., after some bequests to Letitia Aubrey, John Penn, and the expected child, Thomas. The provisions of this will were, of course, in the father's mind during the period of the son's visit to Pennsylvania, and later, and until the will of 1712 was definitely made,- the sale of the Province to the Crown not being completed, the young man stood in succession as Proprietary and Governor. When his father died, no doubt William, Jr., was disappointed and chagrined, if not altogether surprised, to find that he was left simply the estates which had been inherited by or settled on him from his mother and his grandfather, the Admiral. This was the provision made for him in the will of 1712. This will has been several times printed, but is worth giving here as part of the record on which the present narrative chiefly rests:

      "I WILLIAM PENN Esqr so called Cheife proprietor & Governour of the Province of Pensilvania and the Territoryes thereunto belonging, being of sound mind and understanding, for which I bless God, doe make and declare this my last Will and Testament.

      "My Eldest Son being well provided for by a Settlement of his Mothers and my ffathers Estate I give and devise the Rest of my Estate in manner following

      "The Government of my Province of Pennsilvania and Territories thereunto belonging and all powers relateing thereunto I give and devise to the most Hono'ble the Earle of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, and to William Earle Powlett, so called, and their Heires, upon Trust to dispose thereof to the Queen or any other person to the best advantage they can to be applyed in such a manner as I shall herein after direct.

      "I give and devise to my dear Wife Hannah Penn and her father Thomas Callowhill and to my good friends Margarett Lowther my dear Sister, and to Gilbert Heathcote Physitian, Samuel Waldenfield, John ffield, Henry Gouldney, all liveing in England, and to my friends Samuel Carpenter, Richard Hill, Isaac Norris, Samuel Preston, and James Logan, liveing in or near Pensilvania and their heires All my lands Tenements and Hereditamts whatsoever rents and other profitts scituate lyeing and being in Pensilvania and the Territores thereunto belonging, or else where in America, upon Trust that they shall sell and dispose of so much thereof as shall be sufficient to pay all my just debts, and from and after paymt thereof shall convey unto each of the three Children of my son Willm Penn, Gulielma-Maria, Springett, and William respectively and to their respective heires 10,000 acres of land in some proper and beneficiall places to be sett out by my Trustees aforesaid. All the rest of my lands and Hereditamts whatsoever, scituate lyeing and being in America, I will that my said Trustees shall convey to and amongst Children which I have by my present Wife, in such proporcon and for such estates as my said Wife shall think fit, but before such Conveyance shall be made to my Children I will that my said Trustees shall convey to my daughter Aubrey whom I omitted to name before 10,000 acres of my said Lands in such places as my said Trustees shall think fitt.

      "All my p'sonall estate in Pennsilvania and elsewhere and arreares of rent due there I give to my said dear Wife, whom I make my sole Executrix for the equall benefitt of her and her Children.

      "In Testimony whereof I have sett my hand and seal to this my Will, which I declare to be my last Will, revoking all others formerly made by me.

      "Signed Sealed and Published by the Testator William Penn in the presence of us who sett our names as Witnesses thereof in the p'sence of the said Testator after the Interlineacon of the Words above Vizt whom I make my sole Executrix.

      [Signed] "WILLIAM PENN.

      [Witnesses]
      "Sarah West
      "Robert West
      "Susanna Reading
      "Thomas Pyle
      "Robert Lomax

      "This Will I made when ill of a feavour at London with a Clear understanding of what I did then, but because of some unworthy Expressions belying Gods goodness to me as if I knew not what I did, doe now that I am recovered through Gods goodness hereby declare that it is my last Will and Testament at Ruscomb, in Berkshire, this 27th of the 3d Month, called May, 1712.

      "Wm PENN

      "Witnesses p'sent
      "Eliz Penn
      "Tho: Pyle
      "Tho: Penn
      "Eliz: Anderson
      ["]Mary Chandler
      ["]Josiah Dee
      ["]Mary Dee

      "Postscript in my own hand

      "As a further Testimony of my love to my dear Wife I of my own mind give unto her out of the rents of America vizt Pensilvania ??300 a year for her naturall life and for her care and charge over my Children in their Education of which she knows my mind as also that I desire they may settle at least in good part in America where I leave them so good an Interest to be for their Inheritance from Generacon to Generacon which the Lord p'serve and prosper. Amen."

      The will, when a copy was sent to Pennsylvania, did not altogether please James Logan. He wrote to Hannah Penn, on the 4th of November, 1718:

      "The sloop Dolphin arrived from London, bringing us divers letters, and among ye rest one from Jno Page to me with a copy of our late Proprietor's will wch gives me some uneasiness as being Drawn in hast I believe by himself only, when such a settlement required a hand better acquainted with affairs of that Nature.

      "The Estate in these parts is vested in so many without impowering any P'ticular or a suitable number to grant and Convey, that I fear we shall be puzzled. I hope you will take advice there what methods must be pursued in ye Case. In the meantime all the Province & Lower County's are in the Trustees, till ye Mortgage is Cleared, toward w'ch if our remittance by this ship come safe I hope another Large tally will be struck by them."

      To this the extended letter of Simon Clement, of Bristol, the uncle of Hannah Penn, dated at London, March 6, 1718/19, addressed to Logan, replies. Among other things, Clement says,-

      "The Proprietor's will may indeed be said to have been made in haste, as you guess: but it was dictated by his friend Mr. West, though the blunders committed therein could not have been expected from a man of his accuracy. The truth is that he himself had labored under a paraletick affection, from which he never recovered the use of his limbs one side, nor I believe at that time the strength of his capacity, though it was afterwards perfectly restored, and continued to the time of his death, about six months since."

      Clement says further in this letter that he has no fear that Penn's choice of trustees will prejudice the standing of his affairs with those now in power,-Harley, Earl of Oxford, not being in 1718 the popular man he was in 1712. "You know," he says, "at that time they were the fittest that could be thought on; and though they are since grown a little out of fashion, the using their names on this occasion can give no offence to those now in play. Great men lay no stress on such little things. I prepared a draught of a commission for those lords to confirm your Governor, [Keith] by the authority devolved upon them, which I left several weeks since with Lord Oxford, to peruse and communicate with Lord Powlet, but I can't yet get him to dispatch it. And you know we cannot be as pressing on men of their degree as we might on men of our own rank, but I shall continue my solicitation in it as I find opportunity."

      William Penn, Jr., at first signified his disposition to acquiesce in the will's provisions, and to join his step-mother in carrying them out. Later he changed his mind. The will was admitted to probate in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, "in common form," on the 4th of November, 1718, after some delay by William Penn, Jr. He had several meetings with Hannah Penn, in London, and Clement says in the letter already cited, they "mutually declared themselves desirous to cultivate the former friendship in the family, and to submit all their differences to be decided by a decree in the Court of Chancery, to be obtained with as little expense and contest as possible, and I believe they will take that way at last, though the young gentleman seems fickle and inconstant, and has been ready to fly out once or twice since, and is gone again to France without putting in his answer to the bill for proving the will, which must therefore be at a stand until his return, which he pretends shall be in this or the next month. His agents talk as if he believes the will has not sufficiently conveyed the power of government from him, and that he will send over a governor. But I should think he has more discretion than to offer it in earnest, or that he would not find anybody fool enough to go on such an errand; at least I am confident that your governor will never yield up his authentick authority to any person who should come up with a sham one."

      Clement was evidently unaware, as he wrote this, that William Penn, Jr., had already made a definite claim upon the Governorship and Proprietorship of Pennsylvania, and had sent out, several weeks before, a new commission in his own name to Lieutenant-Governor Keith, accompanied by a letter of "instructions." The letter was dated January 14, 1718/19, and directed Keith "immediately to call together the Council, and with them, in the most public manner, make known my accession to the government of the said Province and Counties [upon Delaware] and assure the country of my great affection for them," etc. At the meeting of the Provincial Council, April 28, 1719, Keith laid the documents before the Council, and proposed that the Assembly be immediately (May 6) called together, "in order to join with me and this Board in recognizing Mr. Penn's right and title to the Government,"-to which the Council assented, "every member present" agreeing that the Assembly should be summoned.

      The Assembly, however, on the 9th of May, declined to approve the claim of Penn, Jr., to succeed his father. They pointed out the provisions of the will on the subject of the Proprietary rights. They called Keith's attention to a law passed by them, and confirmed by Queen Anne, providing that the Governor in office at the death of the Proprietary should continue until further order from the Crown, or from the heirs of the Proprietor. And they further emphasized the facts that the will devised the Proprietorship to the two earls, and that the new commission had not the royal approval. Under these circumstances they advised the Lieutenant-Governor not to publish the new commission or the accompanying instructions.

      The Council met two days later, on the 11th, and after discussion, decided by "a majority above two to one" that the Assembly's advice was good. Later, advices were received from London that the Board of Trade and Plantations recognized the validity of Keith's first commission, and regarded that from Penn, Jr., as invalid. It resulted, therefore, that the claim of the Proprietorship and Governorship by the son came to nothing, and apparently was not pressed beyond the one point of sending out the commission and letter to Keith.

      William Penn, Jr., died about two years after his father. The time and place of his death are variously given. John Jay Smith, in his address before the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says he "died in France;" Janney says he "died in France of a consumption;" Maria Webb says he "died in the north of France, in 1720, of consumption." Upon the authority of a genealogical sketch in Lipscombe's "History of Buckinghamshire," cited for me by Rev. W. H. Summers, it may be said that he died at Liege, Belgium, June 23, 1720. His wife, Mary Penn, died early in December, 1733. Rebekah Butterfield's journal, kept at Jordans, contains the following entry:

      "5th of 10th month, [December] 1733, Robert Jordan and John Gopsill was at ye burial of Mary Pen, widow, mother of ye aforesaid William Pen [3d]; they came and went with ye relations."

      Three children of William Penn, Jr., and Mary Penn are known. These were Gulielma Maria, Springett, and William, 3d. The dates of their births are given in the Friends' records (at London) for Surrey and Sussex. Information concerning them may be concisely stated as follows:

      CHILDREN OF WILLIAM PENN, JR., AND MARY.

      1. Gulielma Maria Penn, born Ninth month (November) 10, 1699, at Worminghurst; the "beauty" and "sweet girl" of her grandfather's letters. She married, "early in life," Awbrey Thomas. He was the son of Rees and Martha Thomas, who came from Wales to Pennsylvania and settled in Merion in 1691. Martha, his mother, was an Awbrey, the sister of William Awbrey (or Aubrey), who married Letitia Penn. Awbrey Thomas was born Eleventh month (January) 30, 1694. He "visited England," and there married Gulielma Maria Penn (as above). "He did not long survive his marriage, and died without issue, probably in England." His widow married, second, Charles Fell, who was the son of Charles, son of George, son of Judge Thomas Fell, of Swarthmore Hall. By her marriage with Charles Fell, Gulielma Maria (Penn) Thomas had a son, Robert Edward Fell, "who in the year 1756 was promoted to a captaincy of marines. Afterwards he became a lieutenant-colonel in the army, under which title he lodged a pedigree in the Herald's Office, and procured a confirmation of arms in the year 1770; he was then described as Robert Edward Fell of St. Martin's in the Fields, Middlesex. His will . . . was proved the 28th of February, 1787, by Thomas Brookholding, his sole executor and the husband of his niece Philadelphia. There is no evidence of his having been a married man; but in his will he leaves his sword and pistols to his nephew, William Hawkins Newcombe." There are several letters from him in the collections of the Pennsylvania Historical Society, addressed to Thomas Penn. In July, 1770, he was an officer of Lord Londoun's regiment, and stationed at Limerick, Ireland. He acknowledges the favor of Thomas Penn having paid money for him "to Mr. Barclay" (probably John Barclay, of Dublin), and "having been obliged to make new Regimentals for the Review,"he has drawn for ten pounds more of money coming from his mother's estate,-showing that his mother, Gulielma Maria Fell, was then dead, and indicating that Thomas Penn was the executor of her estate.

      There were two other children of Charles and Gulielma Maria Fell, (1) Mary Margaretta, who married John Barron, and (2) Gulielma Maria Frances, who married John Newcomb. May 26, 1750, M. M. Barron writes to Thomas Penn, from Leeds, a cordial family letter, in which she alludes to her husband. August 24, 1750, J. Newcomb writes from Frowlesworth to Thomas Penn. He and his wife have been boarding, but find it "very disagreeable," and propose housekeeping at Michaelmas. He asks for money. He speaks of "oar little girl," who is at present at Hackney. Another letter from the same to the same, October 22, 1750, announces the birth of "a fine little boy," to "my dear little woman," the previous day, and that "by her particular Desire" he has been named Thomas Penn Newcomb.

      It seems to be commonly assumed that this line of William Penn the Founder, through his granddaughter, Gulielma Maria Penn, and Charles Fell, is now extinct.

      2. Springett Penn, born Twelfth month (February) 10, 1700/1, at Worminghurst. He was the "Saracen" of his grandfather's letters. He did not marry. It is probable that he spent much of his time in Ireland. There are a few letters from or relating to him in the collections of the Pennsylvania Historical Society. One from John Penn to him, dated London, August 3, 1727, on a business topic, is freezingly severe in tone. Springett, however, was evidently not one to permit lectures from his half-uncle-a man of very nearly his own age-to disturb his equanimity. There is a letter from him to John some time later; it is dated "Stoke, March 13, 1728-9," and begins "Dear Jack;" it ends thus:

      "Perhaps Alderman Tom knows more of ye matter than either of us, for it seems he was pleased to receive ye Gentleman's Request very favorably, turned his Quidd wth great Gravity, & gave an assenting nodd. Now if you have fed ye poor Gentleman with hopes and at ye same time cautioned me, ye Devil take you & his Worship ye Ald'n; if otherwise, be free in communicating yor thoughts to my Bro Will, & he'll save you ye trouble of writing them to

      "Yo'r aff Nephew & hum. Servt:

      "SPRINGETT PENN."

      Springett Penn joined with Hannah Penn (his step-grandmother), in 1725, in appointing Patrick Gordon Lieutenant-Governor of Pennsylvania. The chancery suit over the Founder's will was not then settled. At the meeting of the Council, at Philadelphia, June 22, 1726, the commission of Major Gordon "from Springett Penn, Esquire, with the assent of Mrs. Hannah Penn, and his Majesty's royal approbation thereof," was produced and read, and "was forthwith published at the court-house." Springett Penn died in Dublin, Ireland, 8th February, 1731.

      3. William Penn, 3d. He was born, as appears by the Friends' records, at Worminghurst, First month (March) 21, 1703, and made then the "minimus" of the three Williams. He was twice married, and through his first wife descends the Penn-Gaskell branch of the Founder's family.
    Person ID I18504  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 

    Father William PENN,   b. 14 Oct 1644, St. Katherine by the Tower, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1718, Ruscombe, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Gulielma Maria SPRINGETT,   b. Between 1633 and 1634,   d. 23 Feb 1694, Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 61 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 4 Apr 1672  King's Farm, Chorley Wood, Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F8258  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary JONES,   b. 11 Jan 1677,   d. Bef 5 Dec 1733  (Age < 56 years) 
    Married 12 Jan 1699  Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 

    • (1) Jenkins, Howard M., The Family of William Penn, Founder of Pennsylvania: Ancestry and Descendants, London, England: Headley Bros., 1899, pp. 107 et seq:

      WILLIAM PENN, JR.'S MARRIAGE

      William Penn, Jr., was born at Worminghurst, his mother's estate, March 14, 1680/1, ten days after the grant of Pennsylvania to his father. Little is known of his childhood and youth. . . . He was married early. The Bristol Friends' records show the marriage of William Penn, Jr., and Mary Jones, daughter of Charles, Jr., and Martha, at Bristol, on the 12th of Eleventh month (January), 1698/9. He was then not quite eighteen years old. His wife was four years older. She was born on the 11th of Eleventh month (January), 1676/7, and was, therefore, just a day more than twenty-two on her wedding-day.

      The marriage certificate is as follows:

      [The memoriall or Copy of the Certificate of Willm Penn Junr. & Mary Jones's Marriage. The Certificate itselfe being made on double Stampt pchment according to the late Statute.]

      Whereas it doth appeare by the memorialls of the men's meeting of the people called Quakers within the Citty of Bristoll that William Penn, son of Willm. Penn Esq and Mary Jones daughter of Charles Jones Junr, of the same Citty, merchant, did on the four & twentieth day of the eighth month last past manifest their intentions of marriage. AND WHEREAS such their intentions was on the eighteenth day of the ninth month last published in the publique meeting house of the said people in the presence of many people there congregated AND FORASMUCH as there appeares no just cause wherefore a marriage between the said William Penn Junr. & Mary Jones should not be consumated we therefore whose names are hereunto subscribed are witnesses that on the day of the date hereof the said Willm. Penn Junr. taking the said Mary Jones by the hand did declare that he did take the said Mary to be his wife, And that the said Mary holding the said Willm. Penn Junr. by the hand did declare that she did take the said Willm. to be her husband, And that also the said Willm. Penn Junr. & Mary holding each other by the hand did mutually promise each to other to live together husband and wife in love and faithfulnes according to God's Holy ordinances as in Holy scriptures declared untill by death they shall be separated AND ALSO the said Willm. and Mary as a further testimony of such their taking each other and of such their promises each to other have hereunto with us sett their hands the Twleveth day of the eleaventh month in the year one thousand six hundred ninety eight.

      WILL. PENN JUR.
      MARY PENN.

      The names of the Witnesses that subscribed with them to the same Certificate are -

      Walter Duffield
      Thomas Penn
      J. Hampton
      Isaac Jenings
      Tho. Callowhill
      Charles Harford
      Richd. Snead
      Wm. Stafford
      Robt. Bound
      Paul Moore
      Benj: Coole Charles Jones
      Anne Jones
      Margt. Lowther
      Letitia Penn
      Hannah Penn
      Ch: Jones Jun
      Edw : Hackett
      J. Dooer
      Lidia Hacket Junr.
      Margret Lowther Junr.
      Eliz: Corshey
      Richard Rooth
      Marget. Rooth
      Jane Trahear
      Danll. Pill
      Ffra: Roath
      Peter Young Martha Jones
      Eliz: Jones
      Anthony Lowther
      Sarah Roath
      Eliz: Harford
      Jane Watkins
      William Penn
      Nathll. Wade
      Ffra: Whitchurch
      Wm. Cluterbuck Snr.
      Richard Codrington
      Wm. Coplin
      Henh. Swimmer
      Richd. Taylour. Junr.
      John Corshey
      Edw: Jones
      Katherne Bound

      [Certified to be an Extract from the Register or Record numbered Society of Friends 116, and entitled a Register of Marriages formerly kept by the Society of Friends at the Monthly Meeting of Bristol. - From the General Register 0ffice, Somerset House, London.]
    Children 
     1. William PENN, III,   b. 21 Mar 1703, Warminghurst, Sussex,England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Feb 1747, Shanagarry, County Cork, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years)  [natural]
     2. Springett PENN,   b. 10 Feb 1701, Warminghurst, Sussex,England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 30 Dec 1730 and 8 Feb 1731, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years)  [natural]
     3. Gulielma Maria PENN,   b. 10 Nov 1699, Warminghurst, Sussex,England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 1740, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 13:23:14 
    Family ID F8270  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart