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Adam Hendrickse VROOMAN

Male 1649 - 1730  (81 years)


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  • Name Adam Hendrickse VROOMAN 
    Born 1649  Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Nederland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    AFN 1G6F-VV 
    Will 12 Sep 1729  Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 25 Feb 1730  Schoharie, Albany [now Schoharie] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Probate 13 Jun 1730  Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reference Number
    Notes 

    • (1) "Hendrick Meesen Vrooman Updates 2011," a message posted by Barbara Boram on September 30, 2011 to the Vrooman Family History & Genealogy Message Board on RootsWeb.com <http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.vrooman/187/mb.ashx>:

      1649:

      Birth of [Hendrick Meesen Vrooman's] son Adam which is proven the eldest child recorded in 1664 as being 15 years old. However there is no baptismal recording, neither is there baptismal in Leiden in "April, 23 May or June 1649." Adam married 3 times and died 1730. His first wife Engeltje Barentse Bloom and his infant child were killed in the Schenectady massacre in 1690 and his son Barent taken prisoner by the Indians (not sons Barent and Wouter!)

      In 1670 Adam became an apprentice for the miller Cornelis Van den Bergh. [From Burke, Thomas E., Mohawk Frontier: The Dutch Community of Schenectady, New York, 1661-1710, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991.]

      Most likely Adam's house burned with his wife Engeltje and baby in 1690.After several years the village was slowly rebuilt. The Schenectady Census of 1697 shows Adam with wife and 3 children, 1 slave in Schenectady. Therefore some of the claimed children in rootsweb.com, ancestry.com and other publications prior to 1697 are incorrect; the baptized children in Schenectady are Barent 1676, Wouter 1680, Pieter 4 May 1684, Christina 18 Oct 1685, Hendrick 1687, and Johannes 30 May 1697. [From Baptisms in the Dutch Reformed Church.]

      Adam had a correspondence with Jacob Milbourne secretary of Jacob Leisler in 10 Nov. 1689. [From O'Callaghan, E. B., The Documentary History of the State of New York, Albany, NY: Weed, Parsons & Co., 1849.] He made a will 12 Sept. 1729 naming children eldest son Barent, Hendrick, Wouter, Bartholomeus, Timothy, Jacob Meese, Pieter and daughters Maria and Eva .The will was proved 21 May 1730 [rootsweb.com etc.]

      Adam was deacon in Schenectady in 1689

      Adam Vrooman was the first Vrooman settler in Schoharie county about 1714.

      (2) Pearson, Jonathan, Contributions for the Genealogies of the Descendants of the First Settlers of the Patent and City of Schenectady, from 1662 to 1800, Albany, NY: J. Munsell, 1873 <http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/families/firstsettlers/vro_wem.html >:

      ADAM [VROOMAN], son of Hendrick Meese, b. in 1649 in Holland, was naturalized in the province of New York in 1715; in 1670, by consent of his father, he bound himself for two years to Cornelis van den Burgh to learn the millwright's trade for 80 guilders and a pair of new shoes the first year, and 120 guilders the second year; 1683 built a mill on the Sand kil where the Brandywine mills now stand; 1688 bought lands of the Mohawk sachems at Fort Hunter; in 1690, when Schenectady was attacked and burned by the French and Indiana, he saved his life by his bravery in defending his house which then stood on the west corner of Church and Front Streets; on this occasion his first wife Engeltie, with her infant child, was killed, and his two sons Barent and Wouter were carried away captives to Canada; 1697 went to Canada with an embassy to try to obtain the release of his sons (one of whom had turned Catholic), his brother (Jan?) and cousin (son of Pieter Meese of Albany), all carried away in 1690; 1703-1708 obtained a patent for the Sand kil and adjacent lands for mill purposes; 1714 obtained a patent for lands in Schoharie upon which he settled in 1715; some of the Palatines attempted to drive him off. He commenced a stone house 23ft. square by help of his sons, and had proceeded as far as the second story floor beams, when one night his unruly neighbors, led on by one Conrad Weiser, entirely demolished it. He then retired to Schenectady and petitioned to the governor for redress. The governor commanded the sheriff of Albany to arrest said Weiser, and succeeded, it is presumed, in stopping the opposition to Vrooman's cultivating his land. [Doc. History, III, 412.] In 1726 he received an additional patent for 1,400 acres for his son Pieter; made his will September 12, 1729, proved June 13, 1730, spoke of the following children, save Christina and Jannetie, d. on his farm in Schoharie Feb. 25, 1730, and was buried in his private burying ground No, 36 Front Street. He m. first, Engeltie, secondly, Grietje Ryckman, widow of Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck in 1691; thirdly, Grietje Takelse Heemstraat, Jan. 13, 1697, in Albany. Ch. bp: Barent, 1679; Wouter, 1680; Pieter, b, May 4, 1684; Christina, bp. Oct. 18, 1685, m. Teunis Swart; Hendrick, 1687; Johannes or Jan bp. May 30, 1697, in Albany; Maria, Sept. 1, 1699, m. Douw Fonda; Bartholomeus, Dec. 22, 1700; Timotheus, Nov. 3, 1702; Seth, Jan. 7, 1705; Jacob Meese, July 3, 1707, in Albany; Eva, m. Joachim Ketelhuyn; Jannetie, m. Harmen Van Slyck.

      (3) Wickersham, Grace Vrooman and Comstock, Ernest Bernard, The Vrooman Family in America: 1949, pp. 11-15:

      2. ADAM VROOMAN (Hendrick Meese Vrooman) b Sept. 14, 1649, in Holland and at the age of 15 came to new Netherland with his father Hendrick Meese Vrooman. In 1670, with the consent of his father, he bound himself for two years to Cornelis Vanden Bergh of Albany County to learn the Millwright's trade. For the first year he was to receive 80 guilders of silver and a pair of new shoes, and for the second year 120 guilders of silver.

      In 1683 he built a mill on the Sand-kil where the Brandywine now stands (1883). In 1688 he bought lands of the Mohawk Sachems at Fort Hunter. On June 5, 1688 he received from the Common Council of Albany a grant of land consisting of about sixty acres which are described as "being on both sides of the Mohawk River west of Hendrick Cuyler's land - on the south side ten morgens opposite a place called by the Indians JUCKTANUNDA, that is STONE HOUSES, being a hollow rock on ye river side where ye Indians lie under when they travill to and from there country". The other pieces on the north side of the river, one a little "higher than ye said hollow rock or stone houses at a place called by ye natives SYEJODENAWADDE and so eastward down the river so as to comprehend twelve morgens and the other just above the marked tree of Hendrick Cuvler . . . one morgen and three or four little islands".

      These lands were granted for a yearly rent of two bushels of winter wheat conditioned that he should build a small house on it and "plow a part of the land next spring".

      On the 22nd of April, 1703, he received a patent for his millwright on the Sand-kil, described as "all that creek near Schenectady and the mill thereon erected and all profits, etc to the said creek belonging". He is said to have "enjoyed the same" about twenty years.

      On January 2, 1705-6, Vrooman bought additional land of the trustees of Schenectady for the purpose of erecting another mill there. All that remains to show the occupation of this spot for milling purposes by the Vroomans is the ancient brick house built probably by Adam's son Wouter, still standing (1883) and used as a dwelling.

      In 1707, he petitioned to have his patent confirmed and explained because some people insinuate that two small springs or sprouts of water which run into said creek and all meet at a place called SYMONSE'S (Veeder's) meadow were not included in his patent; he therefore desired a new patent, which should include the same and the same and the whole Sand-Kil to the Mohawk.

      Vrooman's patent for lands in Schoharie is dated Aug. 26, 1714. This tract comprised "600 acres of lowland and upland", and was occupied by his son Pieter and his descendants.

      March 30, 1726, he obtained a new Indian title to the flats known as "Vrooman's Land", about 1400 acres of the best land in the Schoharie Valley.

      Adam Vrooman likewise with his brother Jan Vrooman, inherited about 20 morgens of land from his father Hendrick, who bought the same of the administrators of Mrs. Antonia Van Cuyler. Adam's portion consisting of ten morgens, lay directly south of the village and is now (1883) largely occupied by the canal and railroads. In 1726, Adam conveyed his portion to his son Jan. A wood lot was conveyed to him by the patentees of Schenectady on May 4, 1716, which extended along Union St to the grounds now occupied by the New York Central railroad track and was bounded northerly by Green Street. This lot he gave to his son Jan, January 17, 1726-7, "being four morgens of bushland with one-half of the brewhouse thereon, erected and likewise one-half of the furnaces, coppers, vats, vessels, and all other utensils in said brewhouse, being at present in the use and occupation of said Adam Vrooman and Barent his son". This brewhouse stood on the easterly end of the aforesaid lot where the canal and railroad cross Union Street, which was often called Brewer's Street.

      On the 4th day of May, 1718, the patentees conveyed to Adam Vrooman a "piece of pasture land butting the road (front street) south that leads from the north gate towards Jan Luykasse's forty rods and four feet, northward by the Mohawk River 29 rods, butting eastward the pasture ground of Johannes Teller 46 rods, and westward the land in possession of David Lewis 42 rods, all Rynland measure, containing 2 morgens 346 rods". In 1727 he conveyed all that portion of this pasture lot lying between the west line of No. 35 Front Street and the easterly line of said lot, 335 feet Amsterdam measure, to his son Jan, reserving however, a parcel 35 feet long and 18 feet broad for a burying-place for himself, his heirs and assigns forever. This burying place now forms a part of lot No. 35.

      - Professor Jonathan Pearson; 1883, History of Schenectady Patent

      Adam Vrooman was married three times. His first wife, Engeltie Blom, bp May 12, 1652, dau of Barent Janszen Blom and Styntie Pieters. His second wife was Grietje Ryckman, widow of Jacques Cornelise VanSlyck and dau of Harnen Janes Ryckman [sic]. They were married November 18, 1691. His third wife whom he married Jan. 13, 1697 was Grietje Margrietje Takelse Heemstraat.

      Adam Vrooman's first wife, Engeltie Blom, was killed during the destruction of Schenectady in 1690.

      "Engel the wife of Adam Vrooman shot and burnt her child the brains dashed out against ye wall". To some of the inhabitants this assault (by the French and Indians in 1690) was not altogether unexpected and they had for some time previously taken the necessary precautions to prevent surprises. Among those who made a successful defense and kept the foe at bay was Adam Vrooman. Being well supplied with ammunition and trusting to the strength of his building, which was a sort of fort, he formed the desperate resolution to defend himself to the last extremity and if it should prove to be his fate to perish in the flames of his own domicil to sell his own life and that of his children as dearly as possible. His house was soon filled with smoke; his wife, nearly suffocated, cautiously yet imprudently, placed the door ajar. This an alert Indian perceived, and firing through the aperture killed her. In the mean time, one of the daughters escaped through the back door with his infant in her arms. They snatched the little innocent from her arms and dashed out its brains, and in the confusion of the scene, the girl escaped.

      Their triumph here, was, however of short duration. Mr. Vrooman succeeded in securely bolting the door and preventing the intrusion of the enemy. On witnessing Mr. Vrooman's courage the enemy promised if he would desist, to save his life and not set fire to his building. This promise they fulfilled but carried off two of his sons into captivity". Yates in Dunlap's New York, Vol 1, p 176-7. Narrative and notes copied from Long Island Historical Society Memoirs, Vol. 1, p. 312-316.

      Adam Vrooman had thirteen children - nine sons and four daughters, all living at the date of his will save two daughters.

      Children of Adam Vrooman:

      5. BARENT, b 1679; d Aug. 14, 1746; m Tryntje (Catrina) Heemstraat, dau of Takel Heemetraat of Albany

      6. WOUTER, b Sept. 9, 1680; m Maria Hallenbeck.

      7. PIETER, b May 4, 1684; m Grietje Van Alstyne.

      8. CHRISTIANA, oldest daughter of Adam Vrooman, b Oct. 18, 1685, m Oct. 30, 1710, Teunis Swart, son of Teunis Cornelius Swart. She died before 1748.

      9. HENDRICK, b 1687, m twice m (1) Geertruy _____ m (2) Maria Wemp, dau of Barent Wemp.

      10. JAN, bp May 30, 1697, m Cornelia Hagar (dorn).

      11. MARIA b Sept. 1, 1699, m Oct. 29, 1725 Douw Fonda, son of Jillis and Great-Grandson of Jellis Douwse Fonda who was in Beverwyck as early as 1654. About 1751 he removed from Schenectady and settled at Caughnawaga. In 1780 he was an aged widower and resided at that place in a large stone dwelling with wings, his three sons, John, Jellis (Major) and Adam lived nearby. On May 22, 1780 he was slain by Sir John Johnson's Indians and his house plundered and burned. His sons, John and Adam were carried captive to Canada. Major Van Horn of Fonda was a great grandson of Major Jellis Fonda, b 1727, who m Jannetje Vrooman, b 1726 dau of Hendrick Vrooman.

      12. BARTHOLOMEW, b Dec 22, 1700, m Mar 11, 1726, Susanna Bratt, b Jan 2, 1704, dau of Samuel Bratt.

      13. TIEMOTHY, b Nov 8, 1702.

      14. SETH, b Jan 7, 1705, m three times. His first wife was Eva Van Alstyne whom he married Oct 4, 1731. On Nov 28, 1735, he married Geertruy VanPetten, his second wife. He married his third wife, Eva DeGraff, dau of Jesse DeGraff, Jan. 25, 1745.

      15. JACOB MEESE, b July 3, 1707, m Oct 30, 1742, Sara Myndertse. No children.

      16. EVA MAE, b Sept. 7, 1706, m June 25, 1730, Joachim Ketelhuyn, b Aug. 12, 1705, son of Daniel Ketelhuyn and Debora Vele.

      17. JANNELTIE, b Sept. 13, 1712, m Capt. Harman Van Slyck, Vele, son of Corneltie Van Slyck. Capt. Van Slyck died Dec. 20, 1734 and Janneltie m Johannes Lawyer (Pearson).

      (4) Early Records of the City and County of Albany and Colony of Rensselaerswyck, Vol. 3 (Notarial Papers 1 and 2, 1660-1696), Translated from the Original Dutch by Jonathan Pearson, Revised and Edited by A. J. F. Van Laer, Albany, NY: University of the State of New York, 1869-1919, pp. 372-373:

      Indenture of apprenticeship of Adam Hendricksen Vrooman to Cornelis Willemsen van der Burgh to learn the millwright's trade

      Appeared before me, Adriaen van Ilpendam, notary public residing in New Albany in America, and before the hereinafter named witnesses, Cornelis Willemsz van der Burgh of the one part and Adam Heyndricksz Vrooman of the other part, who in love and friendship are agreed in manner following, to wit: Said Adam Heyndricsz (now about 21 years old) acknowledges that with the consent of his father, Heyndrick Meesz Vrooman, he has bound himself to Cornelis Willemsz aforesaid, who acknowledges that he has hired him for the term of two consecutive years, commencing on this 23d of May 1670. The aforesaid Cornelis Willemsz promises in said two years, so far as he is able, to teach said Adam Hendricksz carpentering and millwrighting, to furnish him free board, lodging and washing and to pay him for his labor and service the first year eighty guilders in silver money or large coin and a pair of new shoes and the second year one hundred and twenty guilders in silver money or large coin at said Cornelis Willemsz's choice. And the aforesaid servant promises (with God's help) to serve the aforesaid master said two years with all diligence, assiduity and faithfulness, on the express condition that the servant may try the first six weeks how he likes it and if he does not like it, he may give up his service and be free and shall then receive for the six weeks' service not more than free fare with a horse from Sprinckvielt [Springfield Mass.] to Albany. All that is hereinbefore written the said contracting parties promise (with God's help) to execute and perform, binding thereto their persons and estates, nothing excepted, submitting the same to the jurisdiction of all courts and judges. In witness whereof they have subscribed this with their own hands without fraud or deceit (in presence of Stoffel jansz Abeel and Leendert Philipsz, called as witnesses hereto) in Albany in America, this 23d of May one thousand six hundred and seventy.

      CORNELIS WILLEMSZ
      ADAM HEINDRICKSZ

      [Witnesses:]
      Leender Phyles
      Stoffel Jansz Abeel

      Quod attestor
      ADRIAEN VAN ILPENDAM, Not. Pub.

      (5) O'Callaghan, E. B., The Documentary History of the State of New York, Vol. III, Albany, NY: Weed, Parsons & Co., 1850, pp. 412-413:

      ADAM VROOMAN TO GOV. HUNTER:

      To His Excelency ROBERT HUNTER Esqr Capt Genll and Governour In Cheife In and Over His Majties Province of New York & New Jersey and Vice Admirall of the Same &c:

      MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY

      As In duty bound by my Last to you, I give your Excy an acct How the Palintines threatened In a Rebelious manner If I should build or mannure the Land at Schore that your Excellcy was Pleased to Grant me a Pattent for and In Please your Excellency I have mannured a great part of the Land and Sowed Considerable grain thereon they still drove their horses on it by night,: I then hired my sones to go with me and build me a house I was their and was making a stone house 23 foot Squar and had so high so that I had Layd the Beames for the Chamber I having at the same time an Indian house about 200 yards off for my self workmen & negroe to sleep in, but on the 4th day of this Instant In ye night following they had a Contryvance to tie bells about horses necks and drive them too and fro In which time they pulled my house Stones and all to the Ground the next day I spok with some of them and they used such Rebelious Expressions that was never heard off: but they told me before now when they had done all: they would Run among the Indians John Conradus Wiser has been the Ring Leader of all factions for he has had his son some time to Live among the Indians and now he is turn'd their Interpreter so that this Wiser and his Son talk with the Indians very often and have made treates for them and have been busy to buy Land at many places which is Contrary to your Excellencys Proclamation, and has made the Indians drunk to that degree to go and mark of Land with them: and I am no wayes secure of my Life their for after I came away they went and pulld my son off of the waggon and beat him and said they would kill him or his father or any body Else that came their so that my son was forced to come away: Likewise they say they care for nobody John Conradus Wiser & 2 or 3 more has made their Escape by way of Boston and have Said they will, go for England but has left his son which is their Interpreter to the Indians and every day tells the Indians many Lyes, whereby much mischeiefe may Ensue more than we now think off and is much to be feared: for the time I have been their I have made a diligent scrutiny into all their actions but I dont find a Great many Concerned with this Wiser and his son In their disobedient, unlawfull and Rebelious Proceedings I am well informed who are their Chiefes: for those that are good Subjects among them and will not Joyn with them are afraid the others will Burn their houses down by their threatening words And please you I could Enlarge much more of their misdimeanours but for fear of trobleing yr Excellency too much I shall beg your Excellency pardon att this time, and Ever Remain your Excellencys most Humble and Obedient Servant to Command.

      ADAM VROOMAN.

      Schenectady July the 9th day 1715. In hast.

      (6) Simms, Jeptha R., Schoharie County, and Border Wars of New York, Albany, NY: Munsell & Tanner, 1845, pp. 56-60:

      March 30th, 1726, Adam Vrooman obtained a new Indian title to the flats known as Vrooman's Land, executed by nine individuals of the nation, "in behalf of all the Mohaugs Indians." Some difficulty had probably arisen, in consequence of his holding more land than the first deeds specified. The new title gave the land previously conveyed with the sentence, "let there be as much as there will, more or less, for we are no surveyors;" and was executed with the ensigns of the Mohawk nation - the turtle, wolf and bear.

      Vrooman's patent was bounded on the north by a point of the Onitstagrawa and the Line kill, and on the south by the white pine swamp, (as a little swamp near the present residence of Samuel Lawyer was then called) and a brook running from it, and embraced a good part of the flats between those two bounds from the hill to the river, excepting the Wilder Hook: where dwelt many of the natives, and where . . . was their strongest castle. This patent was given for eleven hundred acres, more or less. It is said to have contained about fourteen hundred acres: than which very little better land ever was tilled. He had not designed to settle on this land himself, but made the purchase for a son. Peter Vrooman, for whom it was bought, settled on it soon after the purchase. He had quite a family, his oldest son, Bartholomew, being at that time fourteen or fifteen years old. He had a house erected previous to his moving there, and other conveniences for living. The first summer, he employed several hands, planted considerable corn, and fenced in some of his land. In the following autumn, he returned with his wife and children to Schenectada to spend the winter; leaving a hired man by the name of Truax, and two blacks, Morter, and Mary his wife, to take care of the property; of which he left considerable. Not long after Vrooman returned to Schenectada, Truax was most cruelly murdered. The circumstances attending this murder, are substantially as follows. The evening before his death, Truax returned from the pleasing recreation of gunning, with a mess of pigeons, which he told Mary to dress and prepare for breakfast. Being fatigued, he retired to rest earlier than usual, and soon forgot his cares and dangers, in a grateful slumber familiar to the sportsman. Mary cleansed the pigeons, and alter having done so, she unconsciously put the knife into a side pocket still bloody, intending, but forgetting to wash it. Morter was absent from home during that evening and most of the night. Mary arose betimes in the morning, with no small pains prepared the savory dish, and waited sometime for Truax to rise. Observing that he kept his room unusually late, she went to his door and called to him, but received no answer. She tried to open the door and found it locked on the inside. As may be supposed, she felt the most lively apprehensions that all was not right. She could, from some position outside the house, look into his window. Thither she with trepidation went, when her suspicions were more than realized, and she learned too well the reason he had not risen at his usual hour. She quickly communicated intelligence of her discovery to the Indians, her nearest neighbors: who, on their arrivale at the house, burst open the door of his room. Horrible indeed was the sight then disclosed. Poor Truax lay in his bed, which he had sought without the least suspicion of danger, cold and stiff in his own gore; with his throat cut from ear to ear. Indian messengers were immediately dispatched to Schenectada, to communicate the tragic affair to Peter Vrooman. About the same time, the bloody knife was discovered in the pocket of the weeping Mary. On the evening of the same, or early the following day, the messengers returned with Vrooman, and proper officers to arrest the murderer, or whoever might be suspected. Suspicions were fixed upon the two blacks; and when the fact of finding the bloody knife in the pocket of Mary, and the circumstance of Morter's being absent from home were known, both were arrested, and hurried off to Albany for trial.

      The day of examination soon arrived, and the prisoners were brought to the bar. The trial proceeded, and the testimony of the Indians, to whom Mary had first communicated her suspicions of the murder, was heard. No unsettled difficulty was shown to have existed between the murdered and the accused: indeed, little appeared at the trial to criminate the blacks, more than is already known to the reader. When the facts, that the throat of Truax had been cut, that a bloody knife was found on the person of Mary, and that Morter had sullenly refused to answer questions during his arrest and confinement, were known to the court, circumstantial evidence was deemed sufficiently strong and lucid to fix guilt upon them: and as the murder had been an aggravated one, the prisoners were sentenced, as tradition says, to be burned alive. When interrogated by the Judge, before passing his sentence, whether they had aught to say why sentence of death should not pass upon them, Mary boldly and firmly declared her innocence, aqd her ignorance of the real murderer: stating, in a feeling manner, all she knew of the affair; how the knife bad been heedlessly put into her pocket after cleansing the pigeons, and forgotten; how much she respected the deceased, and how much she lamented his untimely death; and ended by an appeal to the great Judge of the universe of her innocence of the crime, for which she stood accused. Morter, on being interrogated, remained sullenly silent; and after receiving the sentence, both were remanded to prison. On the day of their execution, which had not been long delayed, the condemned were taken west of the city a little distance, where had been previously prepared, a circular pile of pine faggots of a conical form. In the centre of the pile the victims were placed, and the fatal torch applied. Mary, still protesting her innocence, called on the Lord, whom she trusted would save her; and prayed that he would, in the heavens, show to the spectators some token of her innocence. But alas! the day of miracles had passed; and as the flame surrounded her, she gave herself up to despair. She expired, endeavoring to convince the multitude of her innocence. Her companion met his fate, with the same stoic indifference he had manifested from the hour of his arrest.

      After the execution of this unhappy couple, one of whom, as will be seen hereafter, expired innocent of the crime for which she suffered, the affair died away, and nothing thither was disclosed for several years. Facts then came to light revealing the whole transaction. At the time the murder was committed, a man by the name of Moore resided at Weiser's dorf. The Germans at that settlement, which was distant from the dwelling of Vrooman about two miles, it was supposed, envied Vrooman the possession of the fine tract of land he had secured; and by compelling him to abandon, hoped to possess it. It is not probable, however, that any one of them, except Moore, thought of getting it by the crime of murder. He conceived such a plan, and conspired with Morter to carry it into execution. Moore thought if Truax was murdered, Vrooman would be afraid to return for fear of sharing a like fate, and would then dispose of the land on reasonable terms; when he might secure to himself a choice parcel. Morter was promised, as a reward for participating in the crime, the hand of Moore's sister in marriage. It is not likely the girl herself, had the most distant idea of the happiness her brother had in store for her. Amalgamation to Morter appeared in enticing garments. To pillow his head on a white bosom, and bask in amalgamated pleasure, would, he thought, amply compensate for becoming the tool of Moore. He therefore resolved to aid him, and it was agreed the deed should be executed in such a manner as to throw suspicion on Mary his wife: who, he intended, should prove no obstacle in the way of realizing his sensual desires. The circumstance of his wife's having pigeons to dress, seemed to favor the design. Perhaps he had seen her put the bloody knife into her pocket: at all events; the present seemed to them a favorable opportunity, and they resolved to accomplish the foul deed that night. Accordingly, at midnight, the murderers approached the house in which slumbered their innocent victim. Finding his door locked, they found it necessary to devise some plan to gain admission to his room without breaking the lock, and, if possible, without alarming Mary, a victim they intended the law should claim. By some means they gained the top of the chimney, which was not very difficult, as the dwelling was but one story, and sliding carefully down that, they soon found, themselves in the presence of their still slumbering victim. Which of the two drew the fatal knife is unknown; it is supposed one held him, while the other, at a single stroke, severed the jugular vein. The nefarious deed accomplished, the assassins left the room, and away they sped from the dwelling, fearful alike of their own shadows.

      The light of the morrow's sun disclosed this damnable deed. When the commotion and anxiety of the next day followed discovery, Moore feigned business from home, and kept out of the way until after the arrest of his hardened accomplice. Not long after this murder was committed, a disturbance arose among the Germans, through ignorance, as will be seen, and many of them left the Schoharie valley and sought a residence elsewhere. Moore was among those who went to Pennsylvania. He lived a life of fear for some years in that state, but at length a summons from on high laid him upon a bed of languishing. As disease preyed upon his vitals, the worm of torment gnawed his conscience. Sometimes in his broken slumbers, he was visited (in fancy,) by the ghost of a man struggling upon abed; and as he heard the rattle of his throat as the breath left his body, he saw the fearful gash and the flowing blood. At other times he saw two persons, whom the crackling flames were devouring; and, as the appeal to heaven for a token of the innocence of one of them rang in his ears, he often awoke with exclamations of horror. Being past the hope of recovery, and so grievously tormented, in order to relieve in some measure his guilty conscience, he disclosed the facts above related. Truax was the first white man murdered in Schoharie county; and may be said to have fallen a victim to the unholy cause of amalgamation.

      (7) Will of Adam Vrooman <http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nyschoha/adamvrooman.html>:

      In the Name of God Amen. The Twelfth day of September in the third year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second by the grace of God of great Britain, France and Ireland King Defender of the faith [unknown symbol]. Anno Domini one Thousand Seven hundred Twenty and Nine I, Adam Vrooman of the Township of Schenactendy In the County of Albany Yeoman being Weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be Given to God Therefore Calling unto mind The mortality of my Body and Knowing That it is appointed for all men now To Die Do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament That is To Say principally and above all I Give and recomand my Soul Into The hands of God that Gave it and for my Body I recommend it to the Earth to be Buried in a Christian Like and Decent Mannor at The Discretion of my Executrix noting dobting but at the Generall Resurrection I sall receive The Same Again by the mighty power of God and as Touching Such Worldly Estate Where With it hath pleased God to bless me In This Life I Give and devise and Dispose of The Same In The following manner and form.

      Imprimis Give and bequeath to my beloved eldest Son Barent Vrooman the Sum of four pounds of Good and Lawful money of The Colony of new york to be raised and Levied out of my Estate and to be paid unto him by my herein after named Executrix within three months after my Decease Where with and other Considerations I have given unto him in my Life Time he is toRest and be Contented and I do hereby Debare him of any farther or any pretense or Claim both to my real and personal Estate or any part thererof Whatsoever.

      Item I Give and bequeath unto my Son Henderick Vrooman The Sum of Two pounds Currant Money as aforesaid to be paid unto him by my executrix In mannor aforesaid.

      Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Wouter Vrooman also the sum of Two pounds Currant Money aforesaid to be paid unto him by my Executrix In mannor aforesaid.

      Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Bartholomaeus Vrooman also the Sum of Two pounds to be paid unto him In mannor and form as aforesaid.

      Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Timothy also the Sum of Two pounds Currant money as aforesaid and to be paid unto him in mannor and form aforesaid.

      Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Seth Vrooman also the sum of Two pounds of Currant money as aforesaid to be paid unto him In mannor and form aforesaid.

      Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Jacob Meese Vrooman also the Sum of Two pounds Currant money as aforesaid to be paid unto him In mannor and form aforesaid.

      Item As to my Son Peter Vrooman I Do for Lawful Consideration to my Selfs best Knowing uterly Exclude and Debare of being one of my heirs Both to my real and personal Estate.

      Item As to my Son Jan Vrooman I Exclude him also for that I have Already Given unto him by a Deed his part and portion.

      Item As to my Two Daughters M[aria] and Eva I Leave it Wholly In the Discretion of my Executrix herein After named.

      Item I Give and Bequeath Unto my Dearly Beloved Wife Margrieta Vrooman (to witt) All and Singular my Lands messuages and Tenements Scituate and being within The County of Albany in the province of New York as also all and singular my mov[able] utensils house hold Stuff profits rents and all others debts Due and payable to me for to have and to hold Unto my Said Wife Margrieta and her heirs and assigns for Ever after my decease freely to possess and Enjoy the premises aforesaid for which Consideration it is my will That my said wife shall pay all my Just Debts which are Considerable as Likewise my funerall Charge.

      Item It is my will That in Case there should Remain any of my Estate Either reall or Personall at the time of my Said wifes Death that She Shall Dispose of the Same by her will To such of my Children as She Shall Think Fitt.

      Lastly I do hereby Constitute make and ordain My said wife margrieta Vrooman my only and Sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament and I Do hereby Utterly Disallow Revok and Disannul[?] all and Every Other Former Testaments Wills Legacies requesta nd Executors by me in any other Ways Before this time Named willed and Bequeathed. Ratifying and Confirming This and no Other To be my Last Will and Testament. In Witness Whereoff I have herewith Sett my hand and Seall this Day and year first above written.

      /s/ Adam Vrooman

      Signed Sealed published pronounced and Declared By the Said Adam Vrooman as his Last Will and Testament In the presence of us the subscribers viz

      /s/ James Banks
      Arnout DeGraff [ADG - His Mark]
      /s/ Evert Wendell

      Albany the 13 June 1730

      Be it remembered that on this day and year above written personally Appeared before me Myndert Schuyler being thereunto Delegated and Appointed by his Excell. William Burnet Late Govr. Of New York James Banks One of the Subscribing Witnesses to the within written will of Adam Vrooman and made oath on the holy Evanglish of Almighty God that he saw the said Adam Vrooman Sign Seal publish and Declare the Same to be his Last Will and that att the time thereof he was of Sound Disposing mind and memory to the best of his Knowledge, & that He also saw Evert Wendell one of the said Wittnesses to Said Will Sign as Witness thereto In the presence of the Testator.

      /s/ Myndert Schuyler

      Albany ye 16 June 1730 Be it remembered that on the day and year Above Written Personally Appeared before me Myndert Schuyler being thereunto Delegated & Appointed by his Excell. Will. Burnet Late Govr. Of New York Arnout DeGraff one of the Subscribing Witnesses to the within Written Will of Adam Vrooman and made oath on the holy Evanglish that he saw the said Adam Vrooman Sign Seal publish and Declare the same to be his Last Will and that att the time he was of Sound Disposing Mind and Memory to the best of his Knowledge & that he Also Saw Evert Wendel one of the Said Wittnesses to Said Will Sign as Wittness thereto In the presence of the Testator.

      /s/ Myndert Schuyler

      Albany ye 21 May 1732

      Memorandom That personally Appeared before me Myndert Schuyler thereunto Delegated as aforesaid, Margritta Vrooman the Executrix in the Within Will Named and took the Oath of an Executrix for the Due Execution and performance of the Said Will.

      /s/ Myndert Schuyler

      (8) www.findagrave.com:

      Adam Hendricksz Meese Vrooman
      Birth: Sep. 14, 1649, Netherlands
      Death: Feb. 25, 1730, Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, USA

      Family links: Spouse: Engeltje Barentse Blom Vrooman (1652 - 1690)

      Burial: vrooman family land, Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, USA

      Created by: sandra potter
      Record added: Jul 20, 2011
      Find A Grave Memorial# 73673518
    Person ID I134  Frost, Gilchrist and Related Families
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 

    Father Hendrick Meesen VROOMAN,   b. Between 1621 and 1623, Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Nederland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 8 and 9 Feb 1690, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Jannittgen WOUTERS,   b. Abt 1620, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 17 Apr 1664, Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Nederland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 44 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Marriage Banns 20 Dec 1648  Valkenburg, Zuid-Holland, Nederland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Married 31 Dec 1648  Valkenburg, Zuid-Holland, Nederland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Family ID F772  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Engeltie Barentse BLOM,   b. Bef 12 May 1652, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 8 and 9 Feb 1690, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1678  Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Hendrick Adamse VROOMAN,   b. 1687, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1739, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)  [natural]
     2. Christiana VROOMAN,   b. 18 Oct 1685, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1748  (Age < 62 years)  [natural]
     3. --- VROOMAN,   b. Abt 1689, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 8 and 9 Feb 1690, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Barent VROOMAN,   b. 1679, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Aug 1746, Albany, Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)  [natural]
     5. Wouter VROOMAN,   b. 9 Sep 1680, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Oct 1756, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)  [natural]
     6. Pieter VROOMAN,   b. 4 May 1684, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Dec 1771, Vrooman's Land, Schoharie, Albany [now Schoharie] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 13:23:14 
    Family ID F771  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Grietje RYCKMAN,   b. 1645, A;bany, Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1695, Albany, Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years) 
    Married 18 Nov 1691 
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 13:23:14 
    Family ID F830  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Grietje Margrietje Takelse HEEMSTRAAT,   d. Aft 25 Feb 1730 
    Married 13 Jan 1697  Albany, Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Eva Mae VROOMAN,   b. 7 Sep 1706, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     2. Seth VROOMAN,   b. Bef 7 Jan 1705, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. Jannetje VROOMAN,   b. 13 Sep 1712, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Jacob Meese VROOMAN,   b. Bef 3 Jul 1707, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     5. Maritje Heemstraat VROOMAN,   b. Bef 1 Sep 1699, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jan 1756, Fonda, Montgomery County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 56 years)  [natural]
     6. Jan VROOMAN,   b. Bef 30 May 1697, Albany, Albany County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 12 Sep 1729  (Age > 32 years)  [natural]
     7. Tiemothy VROOMAN,   b. Bef 3 Nov 1702, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     8. Bartholomeus VROOMAN,   b. Bef 22 Dec 1700, Schenectady, Albany [now Schenectady] County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 29 May 2018 13:23:14 
    Family ID F2027  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Sources 
    1. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Hendrick Meesen Vrooman Updates 2011," amessage posted by Barbara Boram on September 30, 2011 to the Vrooman Family History & Genealogy Message Board on RootsWeb.com : The banns were posted . . . 20 December 1648 in Valkenburg for Henderik Meesen Vroomman, young man, and Jannittgen Wouters, young woman.

    2. Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Details: Citation Text: (1) "Hendrick Meesen Vrooman Updates 2011," amessage posted by Barbara Boram on September 30, 2011 to the Vrooman Family History & Genealogy Message Board on RootsWeb.com : . . . Henderik Meesen Vroomman, young man, and Jannittgen Wouters, young woman . . . married 31 Dec. 1648 in Valckenburg.