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25201 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 22, 2010, Batch No.: C165192, Dates: 1813 - 1847, Source Call No.: 1469619 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906682, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

ANNE SMITH
Female

Event(s):
Christening: 07 JUN 1818 Westerham, Kent, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN SMITH
Mother: SARAH 
SMITH, Anne (I21790)
 
25202 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 22, 2010, Batch No.: C165192, Dates: 1813 - 1847, Source Call No.: 1469619 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906682, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

ANNE SMITH
Female

Event(s):
Christening: 21 JUL 1822 Westerham, Kent, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN SMITH
Mother: SARAH 
SMITH, Anne (I21791)
 
25203 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 22, 2010, Batch No.: C165192, Dates: 1813 - 1847, Source Call No.: 1469619 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906682, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

John SMITH
Male

Event(s):
Christening: 07 JAN 1821 Westerham, Kent, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN SMITH
Mother: SARAH 
SMITH, John (I21789)
 
25204 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 22, 2010, Batch No.: C165192, Dates: 1813 - 1847, Source Call No.: 1469619 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906682, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

SUSAN SMITH
Female

Event(s):
Christening: 30 JUN 1816 Westerham, Kent, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN SMITH
Mother: SARAH

(2) Susanna MARCHANT is listed in a household headed by her husband, William MARCHANT, in the 1841 census of Bessells Green, Chevening Parish, Kent, England. The census was taken on the night of June 6, 1841. In the 1841 census, ages of people over 15 years old were usually rounded down to the nearest 5 years. Therefore, someone who was actually 24 years would have his or her age listed as 20, and someone who was actually 27 years old would have his or her age listed as 25.

Susanna is listed in the 1841 census as a person who was then 25 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, she was born in about 1816. According to the 1841 census, she was born in Kent, England.

(3) Susanna MARCHANT is listed in the Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Chevening, Kent, England, as of July 4, 1841, in Baptism Record No. 641, as the mother of Henry MARCHANT and the wife of William MARCHANT. According to this record, Susanna's abode was Chevening.

(4) Susannah MARCHANT is listed in the Register of Baptisms in the Parish of Chevening, Kent, England, as of September 24, 1843, in Baptism Record No. 693, as the mother of Grace MARCHANT and the wife of William MARCHANT. According to this record, Susannah's abode was Chevening.

(5) Susannah MARCHANT is listed in a household headed by her husband, William MARCHANT, in the 1851 census of Maidstone, Kent, England. The census was taken as of March 30, 1851.

Susannah is listed in the 1851 census as a person who was then 35 years of age; therefore, according to the 1851 census, she was born in about 1816. According to the 1851 census, she was born in Westerham, Kent, England.

(6) New York Passenger Lists, 1851-1891 [database online], Provo, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2003:

Name: Susannah Marchant
Arrival Date: 12 Aug 1852
Estimated Birth Year: 1816
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Port of Departure: London, England
Destination: United States of America
Place of Origin: England
Ship Name: American Congress
Port of Arrival: New York
Line: 4
Microfilm Roll: 118
List Number: 1146

(7) Susan MERCHAT is listed in a household headed by her husband, William MERCHAT, in the 1860 census of the 3rd Ward of Toledo, Lucas County, OH. [The compiler believes that Susan was Susannah (SMITH) MARCHANT.]

According to the 1860 census, Susan was then 44 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1816. According to the 1860 census, she was born in England.

(8) The compiler has not found Susannah MARCHANT in the 1870 census.

(9) Trinity Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials; Also Confirmations & Communicants (1858-1874):

Mrs. Susanna MARCHANT was "bcc" [baptized, confirmed and a communicant].

Mrs. Susanna MARCHANT, communicant no. 285, transferred her membership to this church from St. John's Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH in 1870.

(10) Trinity Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials; Also Confirmations & Communicants (1874-1891):

Mrs. Susanna MARCHANT, communicant no. 210, removed to IA in 09/1876.

(11) Susan MARCHANT is listed in a household headed by her husband, William MARCHANT, in the 1880 census of Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, IA.

According to the 1880 census, Susan was then 62 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1818. According to the 1880 census, she was born in England, and both of her parents were born in England.

[Note by compiler: It appears that beginning with the 1880 census, Susannah (SMITH) MARCHANT began to claim that she was younger than she actually was.]

(12) http://www.rootsweb.com/~iadesmoi/Toomstone/PleasantGrove/millersburg. htm:

Millersburg Cemetery, Pleasant Grove Township

[Note by Compiler: According to the Geographic Names Information System of the U.S. Geological Survey, the name of the cemetery is Millerburg, not Millersburg.]

MARCHANT, SUSIE ANNIE May 11, 1821 - December 20, 1891 WIFE OF WILLIAM

[Note by compiler: Based upon the bulk of the evidence set forth in these notes, it appears that Susie Annie's birth year was probably 1816, rather than 1821, as shown on her tombstone.] 
SMITH, Susannah (I75)
 
25205 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 22, 2010, Batch No.: C165192, Dates: 1813 - 1847, Source Call No.: 1469619 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906682, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

THOMAS SMITH
Male

Event(s):
Christening: 21 AUG 1831 Westerham, Kent, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN SMITH
Mother: SARAH 
SMITH, Thomas (I21793)
 
25206 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 22, 2010, Batch No.: C165192, Dates: 1813 - 1847, Source Call No.: 1469619 IT 2, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906682, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

WILLIAM SMITH
Male

Event(s):
Christening: 27 JAN 1828 Westerham, Kent, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN SMITH
Mother: SARAH 
SMITH, William (I21792)
 
25207 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of March 28, 2010, Batch No.: C130982, Dates: 1730 - 1875, Source Call No.: 0992460, 0992461, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6906580, Type: Film, Sheet 00:

GRACE MARCHANT
Female

Event(s):
Christening: 24 SEP 1843 Chevening, Kent, England
Parents:
Father: WILLIAM MARCHANT
Mother: SUSANNAH

[Grace's christening was baptism no. 693 in this parish. In the baptismal record, the MARCHANTs' abode is shown to have been Chevening.] 
MARCHANT, Grace (I798)
 
25208 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of November 10, 2005, Batch No.: C118302, Dates: 1687 - 1772, Source Call No.: 1067963, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: 6901392, Type: Film, Sheet:

ELIZABETH BECK
Female
Event(s):
Christening: 05 JAN 1763 Holywood, Dumfries, Scotland

Parents:
Father: JAMES BECK

(2) Elizabeth Ann Grubb:

NOTES:

Per Mrs. Korns, tradition has it that Thomas and Elizabeth (Betsy) ANDERSON came to the U.S. with their three youngest children to join the older ones who were already here. They did not want to die "alone" in the "Old Country" separated from part of their family. Once here and living in Jefferson County, they became so homesick for Scotland that they grieved themselves to death. Because Thomas was born in 1804 this would indicate that they arrived here sometime between 1805 and 1821. The oldest son, "Scotch" John purchased land in Jefferson Co. in 1812.

REFERENCE:

1. Virginia Korns, 2402 E. Rahn Rd., Kettering, OH 45440

(3) http://www.myindianahome.net/gen/jeff/records/cemetery/hancarm.html:

CARMEL CEMETERY

United Presbyterian Church
Section 15, Town 3 North, Range 9 East.
Hanover Township, Jefferson County, Indiana.
June 2001 Survey - compiled by Vivian L. Shatley.

LAST NAME: Anderson
FIRST: Elizabeth
MIDDLE: Beck
BORN:
DIED: 17 Nov 1821
INSCRIPTION(S): "In memory of" - "aged 58 years" - "Also"
COMMENTS: On same stone as Thomas Anderson - not included on 1941 DAR Record

(4) www.findagrave.com:

Elizabeth Beck Anderson
Birth: Jan. 5, 1763, Scotland
Death: Nov. 17, 1821, Jefferson County, Indiana, USA

Family links: Spouse: Thomas Anderson (1754 - 1822)

Burial: Carmel Associate United Presbyterian Cemetery, Hanover, Jefferson County, Indiana, USA

Created by: Bunnygirl
Record added: Aug 02, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 74304496 
BECK, Elizabeth (I27)
 
25209 (1) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of September 13, 2004:

DAVID LYNDESAY
Male
Event(s):
Christening: 02 JAN 1603 South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland
Parents:
Father: JEREMIE LYNDESAY
Mother: MARGARET COLVILL
Batch No.: C195031
Dates: 1599-1620
Source Call No.: 1067770
Type: Film
Printout Call No: 6901040
Type: Film

(2) Lindsay, Margaret Isabella, The Lindsays of America, Albany, NY: Joel Munsell's Sons, 1889, pp. 26-35, 39-40:

It is probable that our earliest forefather in this country, the Reverend David Lindsay, left the mother country during the reign of Charles the First, that is, between 1645-55. The earliest evidence I have found of his vicinity and occupation is the following, from an old book of court orders:

"Judgment is granted Mr. David Lindsay, (spelled Lyndsay) Minister, whereby he recovers 50 pounds Tobacco from Edward Coles." Northumberland County Court March 20, 1655.

From this evidence we can infer, I think, that he must have been located for some years in the colony. On the death of James, Charles the First's father, in 1625, the Reverend David was in his twenty-third year; he may then have been married or he may not, but, judging of the early marriages of his time, the former is extremely likely. We can give him a few years in Scotland, with the troubled and revolutionary period he lived in, and come to the conclusion he emigrated to Virginia about 1645, and thus entered upon his pastorate in the prime of life.

As appertaining to this pastorate I set down these other three items, also taken from old books of court orders of that time:

"21st of September 1657, Mr David Lindsay recovers of Thomas Lamkin 3775 pounds of Tobacco.

October 1657, Mr David Lindsay, Minister, being behind 700 pounds of Tobacco of his last years salary in Wicomico parish, the Court orders that the said sum of 700 pounds Tobacco be levied out of the said parish (from every Titheable) by the Sheriff, &. &c.

October 1662, Mr. David Lindsay was relieved of a fine imposed for performing marriage between two servants contrary to law. Northumberland County Court House.

The tumultuous times in Scotland and England during the reign of Charles the First, beginning with the religious wars, the Presbyterians in the former country and the Round-heads or Puritans in the latter country, the final execution of the king with many of his followers, including the banishment of others of note who had served him, among whom were not a few Lindsays, and the rising power of the Cromwellites, must have made great changes in many families and caused hundreds to seek peace, safety and comfort in expatriation, as history shows as they did.

The death in Scotland in 1642 of his father, Sir Jerome or Hierome Lindsay of The Mount, Lord Lion King at Arms, and this troubled state of his native country must have led our early forefather to seek a home in the new world. In 1642, as history says, "England fairly begins to get on fire with her great civil war. The dispute between arbitrary power and the rights of freeborn men grew so fierce and high that pike and bullet alone could settle it." Husbandry, industries, and all peace was at an end. To worship God in that form most suited to each man's conscience was denied. Our forefather not being a warrior, but a minister of the gospel, gladly turned his course westward, as that small band upon the Mayflower did about 1620, and sought to preach the gospel and to keep the gospel before the young colonists.

It may be interesting at this point to mention a few things concerning the ministers in the colony. The salary of a minister in the colonies, as fixed by law, was sixteen thousand pounds of tobacco per annum, that is eighty pounds current money; besides this, he is given, if he desires it, a dwelling-house and glebe, together with certain perquisites, as marriages, and funeral sermons. The fee for the first was twenty shillings, or two hundred pounds tobacco, for the second, forty shillings, or four hundred pounds tobacco.

Frequent acts were passed for the payment of ministers until the sessions of 1657-58, when church and state seem to have been radically divorced, and all matters relating to the church left to the control of the people. Prior to 1633 all dealing was paid for in tobacco. A curious style of currency? What a difference from those early days to these - then money as a mode of mutual interchange of barter was nothing; to-day, the breast of all America, young and old, throbs with a keen ambition to have and to make it.

In some parishes there were donations of flocks and negroes, which the minister returned when he died, or gave the value to the donators. By examination of the ancient records of St. Andrew's (Scotland's famous university) I believe that our early ancestor, the Reverend David Lindsay, was a student there. There is a signature thereon of a David Lindsay as being a student of St. Salvatore College of this University, January, 1618, and again, as having graduated M. A., July, 1621, which would make him at that time in his nineteenth year. Combined with the fact that his uncle-in-law, Archbishop Spotswood, was at the head of the university about this period, one can have but little doubt that the above record points to him, and that the influence of this talented uncle, historian of Scotland, as well as the king's primate, induced him finally to settle in Virginia, or at any rate, directed his attention to Virginia.

The London ministry, and, in particular, the Bishop of London, at one time instituted a movement to procure suitable clergymen to settle in the colony, as they were scarce. In 1620, history tells as there were but eleven parishes and five ministers in the whole colony, but this was, no doubt, some years previous to our forefather's arrival. The church in which the Reverend David Lindsay preached was the early Yeocomico or Wicomico church (spelled in both ways), situated near the Wicomico river, in Northumberland county, one of the earliest churches in the Virginian colony.

It was twice destroyed; first during the Revolution, and later again, through neglect, war, and age; but to show the reverence and love the people of this vicinity have for their ancient places of worship, peace once more reigning in our land, a subscription was raised not over five or six years since and a little wooden chapel near the site of the old Wicomico church built, and to-day people gather here to attend divine service.

Bishop Meade, in his history of "Old Churches and Old Families of Virginia," makes no mention whatever of our early forefather's services in Northumberland county; in fact there are several of the oldest families of this county and other counties omitted in this work, but doubtless the omissions were chiefly for lack of the proper source to gain the necessary information from.

For several years the old parish registry of Wicomico church was lost, but it finally turned up in another parish in Lancaster county, in Christ Church of that county, of which the Reverend Edmond Withers was pastor, who called the bishop's attention to it, and who copied some names from it for this book, but whether or not the Reverend David Lindsay was spoken of there as the early minister of Wicomico church, remains hidden to us, for I have made repeated inquiries and search for the ancient register, but can get no trace of it; certainly it was not restored, as it should have been, to the church to which it belonged, for naught is known about it by the present minister of this vicinity in Northumberland county.

Two names copied by Bishop Meade from the ancient register point conclusively to the Reverend David Lindsay's posterity. They were copied because the holders of the names were cited as vestrymen of St. Stephen's parish of this (Wicomico) church. The first was John Opie, date 1754; the second, Lindsay Opie, 1781; both descendants, through his daughter, of the Reverend David Lindsay. As Northumberland county was not incorporated or formed until 1648, our early forefather was among its first inhabitants.

As can be easily understood, the ministers at this early period of the colony were the better learned and polished men belonging to it. Our early forefather's father, Sir Hierome Lindsay, was also possessed of besides "The Mount" of "Annatland," a seat in Scotland, where he resided ere his second union to his cousin, Agnes Lindsay of "The Mount" This former estate was by law, on the death of his father, the property of the Reverend David Lindsay, as the eldest son, but whether he came into possession of it or sold it ere coming to the colony, is a matter of doubt. Here probably he was born. "Duninno" is the name of another place occupied by Sir Jerome or Hierome Lindsay.

I believe both these estates were in Forforshire [sic; should be Forfarshire, now Angus]; Duninno, however, 'tis recorded, passed out of his hands when he possessed Annatland. He was evidently knighted by his king, for he is styled Sir Hierome or Jerome Lindsay of Annatland, before his marriage to his second wife, when he came into possession of The Mount.

Therefore, it can be seen that the Reverend David Lindsay, by the Scottish law of knighthood, on the death of his father, became Sir David Lindsay, and all heirs male of his body in the direct line forever afterward could be styled knights-baronet.

Northumberland must have been one of the best counties in colonial days, for James Waddell, the blind preacher of Virginia, remarked that "he found so much hospitality, intelligence, and polish, amongst the old Virginia gentry here, that he would cheerfully have passed his life among them." History asserts that about 1762, there was a brisk trade with Great Britain from the mouths of the rivers, and much generous piety amongst the merchants and planters of this region.

Westmoreland county, which was the native county of our illustrious Washington, adjoined Northumberland, in fact it was formed from the elder county, Northumberland, in consequence of which the latter is now one of the smallest counties in Virginia. This part of Virginia was called, in the past, the "Athens" of Virginia; for, in Westmoreland, some of the most renowned men of this country have been born, not only Washington, but some of the distinguished Lees, James Monroe, and others of note.

Colonial life is a subject very often written upon now by our best magazine writers, and forms most interesting matter to many, especially the genealogist and modern antiquarian. The habits, the manners and pastimes of our forefathers in early America were, of course, the prevailing habits, manners and pastimes of the mother country. The Cavaliers and the Puritans brought these things with them, as they did their love for freedom and liberty.

The minister of a parish was quite a small potentate. He not only preached the gospel on the Sabbath and other fixed days, married, christened, and read the burial service, but he heard the grievances of his different parishioners, and in some instances even administered the laws, which were those fixed by the London Company for Virginia. He might be given the position of what was then termed ecclesiastical commissioner, who was one appointed by the authority of the English Crown, through the Bishop of London. He kept an account of the clergy and all ministerial movements, as well as watched over the moral conduct of his flock. The old histories of Virginia give a curious account to us of the strict laws in force among the early colonists; it is here worthy of comment that although the desire for religious freedom and liberty was the elementary feeling that brought them to America, yet they were not slow in exacting and keeping up very stiff religious laws, and, to our modern eyes, unreasonable and unjust fines, sometimes the forfeiture of life.

For instance, here is an extract from Hawk's History of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Virginia:

"Rule 6. Religious services by the inhabitants of Virginia during 1611. Sir Thos. Dale, Governor. "Every man and woman duly twice a day upon the first tolling of the bell shall upon working days repair unto the Church to hear divine service, upon pain of losing his or her days allowance for the first omission; for the second omission to be whipt; and for the third to he condemned to the galleys for six months; likewise no man or woman shall dare to violate or break the Sabbath by any gaming publique or private, abroad or at home, but duly sanctifie and observe the same both himself and his family, preparing themselves at home by private prayer, that they may be the better fitted for the publique according to the commandments of God and the orders of our Church; as also every man and woman shall repair in the morning to divine service and sermons preached upon the Sabbath day, and in the afternoon to divine service and catechising; upon pain of the first fault to lose their provision and allowance for the whole week following, for the second to lose said allowance and also to be whipt, and for the third to suffer death."

God be praised that we live in this nineteenth century. Such strict and appalling laws seemed almost the quintessence to our eyes, of intolerant tyranny, yet they may have been necessary at that day, and for the control of rougher and hardier natures than existed as our country grew in intelligence and power. How the charming transparency of our climate must have delighted the colonist, after the denser, gloomier air of his native land; almost every object in nature must have been a source of delight, such abundant, picturesque and grand scenes as met his eye, must, indeed, have made him feel fully compensated for that tedious sea voyage.

There was no need of a scramble for any thing, the woods and the rivers and morasses yielded enough for all: for all, with strong and willing hands, to hunt for what they wished. As the red man gave way to his smarter brother with the pale face, and moved to other hunting grounds far away in the west, Virginia became, in truth, a garden of luxury and abundance to all who came from afar. But plenty encouraged indolence; there were no domestic manufactories beyond that which necessity required; every thing called comfort was imported from England. Tobacco planting was the only pursuit, and this, unfortunately, enfeebled the spirit of invention to a great extent.

Yet we know, when the occasion demanded it later on, this apparent indolence vanished as if by magic; when the hand of tyranny rose to destroy this peaceful method of living, and tried to intimate to this colony of self-exiled English, Scotch and Irish men, because they had exiled themselves they had no longer the rights of men, and must he treated as slaves, and were slaves, then the same spirit that rebelled against such action in the mother country rose with a redoubled fervor in this beautiful wild western home beyond the sea.

But all this was not in the life-time of our reverend forefather, he lived and passed away peacefully amongst the little settlement he had come to, in the capacity of their pastor and divine instructor, and was laid to rest by them on his plantation, "The Mount," and above his ashes was erected a tombstone, which, curious to relate, is to-day in existence.

In 1849 my father commissioned a relative to visit the old homestead and burying-place on it, and he took from the stone the following inscription, although it even then was difficult to decipher; it was surmounted by the engraved coat of arms of the family:

"Here lyeth interred ye body of That Holy and Reverant Devine Mr David Lindsay, late Minister of Yeocomico, born in ye Kingdom of Scotland, ye first and lawful sonne of ye Rt Honerable Sir Hierome Lindsay. Knt of ye Mount. Lord-Lyon-King at-Arms. who departed this life in ye 64th year of his age ye 3d April. anno Dom 1667."

The most glowing eulogy that might have been written by man could not transmit to the Reverend David's posterity a better panegyric than those simple straightforward words engraved above his ashes. Holy and good, and an accomplished divine, he doubtless was, and we may accept this tribute to his memory, as from the vox populi of his day. It may be that his character closely resembled his noted grandfather, David Lindsay, Bishop of Ross; that he was also a man of peaceful nature, wise and moderate, and esteemed by all wise men, and that he did much to cast a refining influence around the rude homes of the colonists, sowing the simple words of the gospel in his vocation, and acting not only as a teacher and exponent of Christ, but as a teacher of all things good, and noble, and elevating in life.

Such an accomplished, learned, and wise grandsire, not to speak of his advantages of birth, education, and superior associates in Scotland, must have made him no ordinary man; and could we draw away the veil hiding the past from us, and look upon the people of his vicinity and parish, with himself moving in their midst, I venture to take upon me to say that I have not overestimated him in my suppositions. Some authorities of the past tell us that the oldest existing tombstone and inscription in this country was on the banks of the Neabsco creek, in Fairfax county, Virginia, the date upon it going back to 1668, but present authorities of the locality assert that the date, although much obliterated by age, can only be traced to 1678. If this is truly the correct date, then the tombstone of the Reverend David Lindsay can carry off the honors of antiquity.

The Lindsay burying ground, a picture of which I have given my readers, is on the original homestead of the family, on Cherry Point Neck, Yiocomico or Wicomico river, Northumberland county, now owned by Mr. William Harding of Northumberland. I am sorry to say that the burying ground is sadly out of repair, overgrown with weeds and brushwood, and an altogether wild and desolate looking little spot, the tombstone of our first forefather sunken in its masonry and fast beginning to tumble into mother earth. It seems a pity that its honorable antiquity is not tended with more care and veneration, but the long absence of those of the blood and name in the old locality has doubtless much to speak for this. . . .

The first evidence I had that our early ancestor, the Reverend Sir David Lindsay, left a will, was the following court item:

"A probate of will was granted on petition of Mistress Helen Lindsay daughter to Mr. David Lindsay in April 1667."

Records of Northumberland County Court House 1667.

I was naturally anxious to obtain, if possible, a copy of such an ancient document, but my hopes seemed destined to disappointment, for examination of the ancient fragments of record revealed nothing more for me, until after several months went by, and a short time since a letter came from Mr. Crallé telling me another search had made him successful, the will was found! It is needless to say how pleased and gratified I felt. The following is a copy of it, also the legal attestation by the clerk of the court as to its discovery.

You will note that our early forefather mentions therein no wife and no son, which leads me to suppose that both were dead when he executed it; the said execution was made on the day before his demise. See date of death upon his tombstone in preceding chapter. If his wife were not dead he could not deprive her of dower, and something must have been bequeathed to his son by the law of inheritance, in those days the son usually coming in first for his father's real and personal estate, or he may have provided for him during his life-time.

The will of the Reverend David Lyndsay (copied exact):

"In the name of God amen. I, David Lyndsay, Minister of God now in Virginia, being now deseased in body, but of perfect memory doe now make my last will and testamt. Imps I bequeath my soule to the almighty, my Savior and redeemer, by whose passion I have assured hope to - Eternally wth him in happiness.

Item. I give and bequeath my body to the earth to be buried by my Exectx in decent and Xtian buriall. Item. I bequeath all my goods, lands, chattels, debts, servts, moveables, or whot else is mine unto my loving daughter Helen Lyndsay whom I constitute, appoint, and ordain my lawfull executx to this my last will and Testamt to be fulfilled. and I do hereby give and bequeath my whole estate to my loving daughter Helen Lyndsay, to her, her heirs, execr & admr, and I do grant and acknowledge this to be my last will and Testament by my subscription and seale in the 2d day of Aprill in the year of the reigne of or Soveraigne Lord Charles, King of England Scotland France and Ireland, and in the year of or Lord 1667.

DAVID LYNDSAY.

Signed sealed & ad in the presence of James Claugton (or Clayton)
The mark of Clem Arlidge.
GEORGE DEASON.

The __ of Aprill 1667 this was proved to be the last will and testament of Mr David Lyndsay decd by the oaths of James Claughton and Clem Arlidge & is recorded.

Letter certifying to the finding of the above will by the clerk of the Northumberland Court House.

State of Virginia
Northumberland County, to wit,

I Wm S. Crallé, Clerk of the County Court of said county, do certify that the writing on the opposite side of this paper (meaning his letter) is a copy of the Will of David Lyndsay as found in an old mutilated record book in Clerks Office, of said county, copied accurately as I could considering the style and legibility of the writing in said book, with the omission of one word which immediately precedes the word "eternally" as found at the beginning of 6th line, which omitted word I was unable to make out. Given under my hand this 4th day of April 1888.

Wm S. CRALLÉ Clerk of the County Court of Northumberland Va.

(3) Genealogical Records: Virginia Colonial Records, 1600s-1700s [database online], Genealogy.com:

Some Emigrants to Virginia, Surnames, K-L, p. 52:

LINDSAY, REV. DAVID (1603-1667), Northumberland county; eldest son of Sir Hierome Lindsay, of The Mount, Lord Lyon King at Arms, Scotland.
V. M., XVIII, 90-92.

LINDSAY, JOHN (in Virginia about 1675), in 1682 was of Bradwinch, Devon.
Middlesex Records.

(4) Dobson, David, Directory of Scottish Settlers in North America, 1625-1825, Baltimore, MD.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1984, reprinted 1988, vol. v., p. 87:

LINDSAY REV. DAVID

Born in Scotland in 1603, son of Sir Hierome Lindsay and Jane Ramsay [?]. Emigrated from Scotland to America. Settled in Northumberland County, Virginia c1645. Died in 1667. (VG)

(5) Dobson, David, Scots on the Chesapeake - 1607-1830, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1992, p. 84:

LINDSAY, DAVID, b. 2 Jan. 1603, s. of Sir Jeremy Lindsay and Jane Ramsay [?], res. Leith, Midlothian, clergyman, sett. Wicomico ph, Northumberland Co, Va, 1655, m. Susanna ?, fa. of Robert, d. 3 Apr. 1677. (CCVC32) (Northumberland g/s) . . .

LINDSAY, JAMES, s. of Sir Jeremy Lindsay of Annatland, sett. Gloucester Co, Va, 1635, fa. of Caleb. (WMQ.2.6.348)

(6) Dobson, David, The Original Scots Colonists of Early America: Supplement 1607-1707, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1997, p. 56:

LINDSAY, Reverend DAVID, born 1603 in Leith son of Sir Jeremy Lindsay and Jane Ramsay [?], settled in Northumberland County, Virginia, ca.1645, died 1667. [VG][OD#8]

LINDSAY, JAMES, son of Sir Jeremy Lindsay of Annatland, settled in Gloucester County, Virginia, 1635. [WMQ.2.6.348]

(7) Genealogical Records: Virginia Colonial Records, 1600s-1700s [database online], Genealogy.com:

Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 4, p. 351:

MR. HUGH LEE, 1100 acs, in Petomeck freshes above Puscatoway, on the Wwd. side of the river, bounding Sly. upon Mr. Claies land, Nly, along the river & parallel to Mr. Cley. 15 July 1657, p. 114, (170). Trans. of 22 persons: Jonathan Marrow, Mary Marrow, Dorithy Marrow, Wm. Browne, Wm. Hanniver, Geo. Wilson, Hannah Lee, Mr. David Linsey, Anne Murrall, Joshua Esto, Anne Moore, Junr., Anne Moore, Senr., Dan Lile, Jno. Carr, Eliz. Parry, Mary Harris, Eliz. Hardinge, Mary Barkinton, Anne Murrall, Joshua Estoe, Wm. May, Rob. Smart.

[Note by compiler: Thousands of Virginia's early settlers arrived in the colony as a result of the headright system. Under this system, anyone who paid for his transportation (or someone else's transportation) to Virginia was entitled to receive 50 acres of land for each immigrant transported to Virginia at his expense. In order to receive a land patent under the headright system, an individual would petition the county court for certification of these rights. The certificate was then recorded in the county court minute books. The petition for a certificate was usually filed soon after the arrival of the immigrants, while proofs of the claim where fresh. The documents certifying these rights, formally termed "transportation rights," but commonly called "headrights," were used as paper currency and freely sold, bartered or assigned to others at or near the time of certification. For that reason they could have remained in circulation for a considerable time before ultimately being "tendered" for land. Before 1705, these rights could have been claimed for multiple arrivals of the same person. Assuming that Mr. David LINSEY, who was transported to VA by Mr. Hugh LEE, was the same person as Rev. David LINDSAY, he arrived in VA no later than July 15, 1657, when Mr. Hugh LEE was granted a patent for transporting 22 persons, including David LINSEY, to Virginia. However, as shown elsewhere in these notes, the Rev. David LINDSAY was in VA before July 15, 1657.]

Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 4, pp. 374-375:

MR. DAVID LINDSEY, 236 acs. Northumberland Co. upon Perries Cr, 23 Mar. 1657, p. 207, (302). Beg. on sd. Cr., running to head of the branch parting this from land in possession of Richard White, Carpenter. 210 acs. granted unto Thomas Willford 10 Nov. 1651, assigned to Edward Henly, reassigned to sd. Wilsford, who assigned to sd. Lindsey; 26 acs. granted Thomas Wilsford 1 Aug. 1653 & assigned as above noted. Trans. of 1 pers. Renewed 18 Mar. 1662.

(8) David LINDSEY was the grantee in a land patent dated 23 March 1657 covering 236 acres of land in Northumberland County, VA. See the following information in Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants/Northern Neck Grants and Surveys :

URL: http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=302&last=&g_p=P4&co llection=LO Patent

Title: Lindsey, David.

Publication: 23 March 1657.

Gen. note: "Patt. renewed in sd. Lindseys name, Mar 18th, 1662."

Other Format: Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.

Note: Location: Northumberland County. Description: 236 acres on a creek now known and called Perries Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 4, 1655-1664, p. 302 (Reel 4). Part of the index to the recorded copies of patents for land issued by the Secretary of the Colony serving as the colonial Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia.

Subject - Personal: Lindsey, David, grantee.

Subject - Topical: Land titles - Registration and transfer - Virginia - Northumberland County.

Subject - Geographic: Northumberland (Va.) - History - 17th century.

Genre/Form: Land grants - Virginia - Northumberland County.

Added Entry: Virginia. Colonial Land Office. Patents, 1623-1774. Library of Virginia. Archives.

System Number: 000785551.

(9) Following is a transcription of David LINDSEY's land patent dated 23 March 1657 covering 236 acres of land in Northumberland County, VA:

To all &c. Whereas &c. Now Know ye That I the said Samuel Mathews Esq. &c. give and grant unto Mr. David Lindsey Two hundred & thirty six Acres of Land, lying situate, and being in The County of Northumberland upon a Creek now known & called Perries Creek bounded as followeth Viz. Two hundred and ten Acres part thereof Beginning on a point on Perries Creek so running Northeast ½ east to a Quarter marked tree at the head of a branch parting this Land from the Land now in possession of Richard White Carpenter from the said marked tree by marked trees Southeast?150 poles to Another Quarter tree on the branch from the said Tree SouthWest 210 poles by marked trees to another quarter marked tree by Marked Trees down to the head of a small branch coming Out of perries Creek aforesaid 160 poles north West & Twenty Six Acres the Other part thereof Beginning at a quarter marked Tree upon a small swamp where the aforesaid Tract Of Land ends and running East by South along the said Swamp past the head thereof 96 poles to a quarter marked Tree upon the plain from thence South ½ a point Easterly 21 [?] poles to Another quarter marked Tree being Another Corner of the aforesaid Land, thence North West 150 poles by marked Trees to the place first mentioned including in a Triangular Figure the said quantity of Land. The said Land being due unto him the said David Lindsey as followeth viz.: 210 Ten Acres the first part thereof being formerly granted unto Thomas Willford by patent dated the 10th of November 1651 and by him Assigned unto Edward Henly, and by the said Henley reassigned to the said Willford and by the said Willford Assigned unto the said David Lindsey and 26 Acres the Residue being likewise granted unto the said Thomas Willford by patent dated the first of August 1653 and assigned to the said Henley & by the said Henley reassigned unto the Said Willford and by him Assigned to the said David Lindsey & renewed by order of the Governor and Council bearing date with these presents & due by and for the Transportation of one person &c. To Have &c. yielding &c. which payment &c. provided &c. dated the 23rd of March 1657.

(10) Genealogical Records: Virginia Colonial Records, 1600s-1700s [database online], Genealogy.com:

Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume I, Northumberland County Records, 1652-1655, p. 365:

Wm Harding his Censure and Banishmt "Whereas articles were Exhibited agt Wm Herding by mr David Lindsaye upon suspicion of Witchcraft Sorcery &c And an able Jury of Twenty fower men were impannelled to try the matter by verdict of wch Jury they found part of the Articles proved by severall depositions The Court doth therefore order that the said Wm Harding shall forthwith receive ten stripes upon his bare back and forever to be Banished this County and that hee depart within the space of two moneths And alsoe to paye all the charges of Court". [Note: The Rev. David hailed from a country where witchcraft and sorcery were not unknown in song, story and whispered family tradition. He doubtless knew it when he saw it. However his name appears in the record which is more than can be said for the brave twenty-four. It is a matter of great regret that I am unable to find any trace of these interesting depositions. Weighing every word in this entry, as well as those omitted, the thought occurs that had I been a first class, proven sorcerer, I would have called upon my friend the Devil, and with his help made it quite hot for this and that person in Northumberland before I departed the county within two months. And also, although I sedulously avoid murder trials in the press, passing furnerals and other such heathenish manifestations, still I would just love to be able to step back to 1655, have been there, and been a part and parcel of this unholy adventure in the fourth dimension at the Northumberland Court. B. F.]

(11) Genealogical Records: Virginia Colonial Records, 1600s-1700s [database online], Genealogy.com:

Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Volume I, Northumbria Collectanea, 1645-1720, A-L, p. 566:

Lyndsay, David, minister. Fined 10000 lb tobo for marrying Richard Peirce, carpenter, servant to Col Richd Lee, to a woman servant belonging to Tho Brewer, without permission from Col Lee. Rev Lyndsay appeals to next Quarter Court at James City. 20 Jan 1661/2. 2.150.

Rev. David. Acquitted of 10000 lb tobo fine. 8 Oct 1662. 2.167.

Rev. David and Susanna his wife. In dif with Charles and Isabel Ashton. Very scandalous. 4 Aug 1665. 15.158-66.

David. "minister of God's word in Virginia". Will. d 2 April 1667. p 8 April 1667. All estate to daughter Helen Lyndsey, she exor. Wit: Jas Clayton, Clemt Arlidge, George Reason. 16.12.

Mr Dav. decd. Prov of will to his dau Mrs Helens Lyndsay. 8 April 1667. 3.11.

Mr David. Capt Tho Brereton atty of Wm Wathen [this name may well be Walker] Exor of Mr David Lyndsey petitions for 1178 lb tobo from Charles Ashton. 21st Jan 1668/9. 3.55.

Mr David. Joane Willioughby widow assigns her thirds in land belonging to Mr Tho Opie formerly in possession of Mr David Lyndsay. 17 Mar 1674/5. 3.224.

David. Wit deed Hobbs to Crawford. 6 Dec 1683. 17.212.

Lyndsey, Helen. P of A to Anthony Bridges of Westmorland Co. Refers to her deceased father Mr David Lyndsey. Wit: Richd Haskins, Wm Wathen. 6 Apl 1667. 16.13.

Robt. Age 24 yrs or th-abts. 4 Aug 1665. 15.162 also p 165.

Wm. His wife Diane, dau of Nath Hickman, enticed to runaway with Tho Barrett to Rappahnnock. Sam Perry says he was Informed she married him there. [She did.] - Jan 1666/7. 16. pp 10.11.

(12) Worrall, The Friendly Virginians: America's First Quakers (1994), p. 16:
Seven little circles of Virginians began meeting to worship in the manner of Friends after 1655.

One group, at Corotoman near the mouth of the Rappahannock River in Lancaster County, met from 1656 until 1659. It disrupted after the members refused court orders to pay the Reverend Mr. David Linsey of the established church "in satisfaction for his ministry among them." Most of the Corotoman Friends, including the Dickinson, Powell, Gorsuch and Clapham families, moved up Chesapeake Bay to the Patapsco River, where they were the first settlers on the site of present day Baltimore.

(13) www.findagrave.com:

Sir David Lindsay
Birth: Jan. 3, 1603, Scotland
Death: Apr. 3, 1667, Wicomico Church, Northumberland County, Virginia, USA

Lindsay was the pastor of the Wicomico Church established 1635.

Tombstone Epitaph

Lindsay "Her lyeth interred ye body of that holy and reverant devine Mr David Lindsay, late minister of Yeocomico, born in ye kingdom of Scotland, ye first and lawful sonne of yr R'Honorable Sir Hierome Lindsay, K of the Mount. Lord Lyon King at Arms who departed this life in ye 64th year of his age ye 3rd April anno Dom 1667. . . .

Burial: The Mount, Wicomico Church, Northumberland County, Virginia, USA

Created by: Don Giddens
Record added: Jan 07, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 46431000 
LINDSAY, Rev. David (I9043)
 
25210 (1) The compiler believes that Eleanor (FROST) and Helena (FROST) were the same person. Such belief is based upon the following facts:

• The names Eleanor and Helena sound alike.

• Both Eleanor and Helena were married to a Thomas FROST.

• Both Eleanor and Helena had children who were christened in St. Botolph, Colchester, England.

• Helena's child, William, was born in 1703, in a gap in time between the births of two of Eleanor's children.

There can be no assurance that the compiler's belief is correct. 
(FROST), Eleanor (I39033)
 
25211 (1) The compiler believes that Nancy HALE was closely related to Mary "Polly" HALE, the wife of John L. MISER. It is possible that these two women were sisters or first cousins of each other.

(2) A household headed by Nancy MISER is listed in the 1860 census of Union Township, Laclede County, MO. Nancy's husband, Michael MIZER, Sr., is not listed with her in this household. [Note by compiler: The image of the census page is very faint, and the compiler is not certain that he has read it correctly.]

Nancy is listed in the 1860 census as a person who was then 43 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1817. According to the 1860 census, she was born in TN.

Listed with Nancy is her son, Wm. H., a day laborer who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1843. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Nancy is her son, Elijah H., a day laborer who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1845. According to the 1860 census, he was born in MO.

Also listed with Nancy is her son, Wesley W., who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1847. According to the 1860 census, he was born in MO.

Also listed with Nancy is her son, Albert B., who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1849. According to the 1860 census, he was born in MO.

Also listed with Nancy is her daughter, Nancy, who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1851. According to the 1860 census, she was born in MO.

(3) Nancy MIZER is listed in a household headed by Carrol BOWLES in the 1870 census of Lebanon Township, Laclede County, MO.

Nancy is listed in the 1870 census as a person who was then 54 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1816. According to the 1870 census, she was born in TN. 
HALE, Nancy (I30372)
 
25212 (1) The compiler believes that the maiden name of Moses FRENCH's wife may have been CONGLETON, based primarily on the fact that Moses' son, John Congleton FRENCH, had an usual middle name, Congleton. The compiler has never seen the name Congleton as a given name of anyone other than John Congleton FRENCH. The compiler cannot prove that the maiden name of Moses FRENCH's wife was CONGLETON; her maiden name is listed here as CONGLETON? primarily to stimulate further research. CONGLETON?, --- (I1926)
 
25213 (1) The compiler believes that William George PARKS was the same person as William C. PARKS, whose burial information is set forth in Note (2) below.

(1) Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records, 1683-1993 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015:

Name: William G Parks
Probate Date: 16 Feb 1893 [4 Jan 1894]
Probate Place: Armstrong, Pennsylvania, USA
Inferred Death Year: Abt 1893
Inferred Death Place: Pennsylvania, USA
Item Description: Will Books, Vol 5-6, 1891-1904

(2) www.findagrave.com:

William C. Parks
Birth: 1813
Death: 1893

Burial: Leechburg Cemetery, Leechburg, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, USA

Created by: Karen Freilino
Record added: Jun 05, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 27341263 
PARKS, William George (I42261)
 
25214 (1) The compiler does not know whether all of the references to William FROST in notes (2), (3) and (4) below are references to the same person.

(2) Hamlin, Charles Hughes, Virginia Ancestors and Adventurers, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1975, p. 62-63:

CHARLES CITY COUNTY, VA. - ORDER BOOK - (1676-1679) . . . Page 335-

3 October 1678 - Complaint of William Frost, apprentice of John Harrison, taylor, that he was beaten by his fellow "prentices" and not taught the trade by his master and also that he has been sent for by his mother in Ireland and wishes to be released. The neighbors, denying any ill-treatment, the Court calls it a childish complaint; redraws his indenture; and charges that the art of tailor be carefully taught and at the end of his indenture, his master to give said Frost one good gun, two suits of apparel, linen and woolen from top to toe and one cow and calf.

(3) Bockstruck, Lloyd DeWitt, Virginia's Colonial Soldiers, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1988, pp. 215-16:

The following are taken from records relating to Virginia in the Public Record office, London, C.O.5/1312.

THE FOLLOWING ARE MILITIA LISTS FOR THE COUNTIES AND DATES INDICATED. . . .

Charles City County, ca 1701/2:

. . . William Frost. . . .

(4) Virginia Quit Rent Rolls, 1704 :

This is an abstract of rolls listing land owners who paid quit rents to the Crown in Virginia in 1704.

Name: Frost, Wm.
Title:
Acres: 50
County: Prince George
Comments:

[Note by compiler: Prince George County, VA was formed from that part of Charles City County, VA that lay on the south side of James River. The Virginia General Assembly authorized the formation of the county in 1702, but it was not finally organized until July 1703.]

See also Duvall, Lindsay O., Prince George County, Vol. 1, Land Patents 1666-1719, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Series 2, Vol. 6, Irvington, VA: 1962; Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia Records, 1733-1792, Richmond, VA: 1975, p. 42.

(5) Thousands of Virginia's early settlers arrived in the colony as a result of the headright system. Under this system, anyone who paid for his transportation (or someone else's transportation) to Virginia was entitled to receive 50 acres of land for each immigrant transported to Virginia at his expense. In order to receive a land patent under the headright system, an individual would petition the county court for certification of these rights. The certificate was then recorded in the county court minute books. The petition for a certificate was usually filed soon after the arrival of the immigrants, while proofs of the claim where fresh. The documents certifying these rights, formally termed "transportation rights," but commonly called "headrights," were used as paper currency and freely sold, bartered or assigned to others at or near the time of certification. For that reason they could have remained in circulation for a considerable time before ultimately being "tendered" for land. Before 1705, these rights could have been claimed for multiple arrivals of the same person.

The references in notes (6) and (7) below describe patents which were granted for transporting persons, including persons named William FROST, to VA. The compiler does not know which, if any, of such William FROSTs are the same person as any of the William FROSTs mentioned in notes (2), (3) and (4) above.

In analyzing each of these patents, the following facts should be borne in mind:

• The patentee was not necessarily the importer.

• The importation did not necessarily take place at about the same time as the grant of the patent.

• The imported persons were not necessarily imported into the same county in which the patented land was located.

• The imported persons were not necessarily transported together.

• The same person may have been claimed to have been imported more than once.

(6) Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers - Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants - 1623-1666, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1963, vol. 1:

P. 180:

STEPHEN GILL, 1150 Acs., Yorke Co. 30 Apr. 1649, p. 163. Lyeing on N. side of Yorke River up Rosewell Cr., part being a neck of land within the main branches of said Cr. & the rest S. E. upon a pocoson, S. upon land of Mr. Gouch & W. upon a former devident of sd. Gills. Due for trans. of 23 pers: Francis James, Wm. Thomas, John Hart, THO. HOLLOWELL, Richd. Smith, Sarah Smith, Robert Cartar, Andrew Cobb, James Hunt, Edwd. Harvey, Wm. Roberts, Fra. Smith, Ja: Winchett, Edward Parr, Robt. Pinn, Tho. Hackery, Edwd. Nessum, James Wilson, WM. FROST, Wm. Wright, Ralph Jarret, Alex. Downes, Peter Sterkey. [Capitalization of THO. HOLLOWELL and WM. FROST added by compiler.]

[Note by compiler: Some HOLLOWELLs were prominent Quakers. Also, as of 23 October 1695, a John FROST and a John HOLLOWELL were neighbors in Norfolk County, VA.]

* * *

P. 302:

CHRISTOPHER REGAULT, 600 acs. Glouster Co., 6 Mar. 1654, p. 318. Upon Ewd. side of a main swamp of Crany Cr., upon the head of Breemans Neck & adj. devdt. of Mr. Breeman, etc. Trans. of 12 pers: Christopher Regault, WILLIAM FROST, Symon Parrett, Joan Bugg, Wm. Woodars, JOHN BRASHERE, Thomas Studdell, his wife & child, William Risbixt & his wife, William Todd. [Capitalization of WILLIAM FROST and JOHN BRASHERE added by compiler.]

[Note by compiler: A Thomas FROST of Calvert County, MD was a beneficiary under the will of Robert BRASHIEUR, Sr. dated December 4, 1665 and probated on December 16, 1665. The other beneficiaries under the will were Mary BRASHIEUR, John COBRETH, Robert JARVIS, Thomas SMITH and Thomas TOVEY. Cotton, Jane Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, Baltimore, MD: 1904, v. 1, p. 33. The John BRASHERE mentioned in Cavaliers and Pioneers may be related to John BRASSEUR, the son of Robert BRASSEUR, Sr., a Hugenot minister who died in Calvert County, MD in 1665.]

* * *

P. 378:

THOMAS WILKINSON, 6000 acs. above the head of Patomeck Cr., beg. at westermost comer of land of Mr. Merriweather now in the tenure of Nicholas Russell. 10 June 1658, p. 222, (320). Trans. of 120 pers: Robert Dennett, Thomas Lyne, Susan Symson, Richard Jones, Sam. Jones, Jeffery Steele, Hum. London, Retrun Garrett, Sara Hanker (or Hauker), Easter Hauker (?), Prudence Moone, Frances Moone, 10 Negroes from Mr. Bennett, 6 Negroes in the Roe Bucke, Henrick Denton, James Roe, Joane Roe, Wm. Roe, Damascene Roe, Guy White, Peter Gambore, Henry Parson, Wm. Willblood, John Duffie, Wm. Collman (or Coleman), Mr. Geo Miniefie, Mrs. Mary Minifie, Mrs. Eliza. Minifie, Mrs. Eliza Booker, Mrs. Eliz. Dolivell, Mr. John James, Nicholas Martiaw, Capt. Henry Perry, Silvester Stokes, Wm. Smith, Mich. Waller, Sam. Banier (?), Ann Taylor, John Williams, David Goodaile, Robert Breswell, Sara Mackore, John Madory, Ann Roe, Jno. Motis, Lucy White, Mary White, Jno. Muckully, Wm. Plumtree, Michaell Batts, Tho. Hindes, Terin. Hely, Jno. Davenant (?), Robt. Wegans, WM. FROST, Thomas Page, Henry Roult, Wm. Eyres, John Murton, Rich. White, John Lee, Jno. Polson, Richd. Plaine, Richard Vennalls, John Williams, Sam. Hocksteed, John Osman, Sarah Dowdin, Jno. Lewis, Ralph Blessinge, Basill Alcocke, THO. WILKINSON, Mary Willson, John Ralph, Wm. Horsley, John Sparrowe, Daniell Herriman, Francis Wheler, 11 times, Huntington Ayres, Henry Boulton, Richard Dolle, John Scott, John Carter, John Gault, Andrewes Smith, John Turke, Robt. Haynott, Rich. Shepard, Bernard Tynns (?), Stephen Hall, Robt. Sanders, Wm. Morris. Renewed 18 Mar. 1662. [Capitalization of WM. FROST and THO. WILKINSON added by compiler.]

[Note by compiler: The patent issued to Thomas WILKINSON does not specify the VA county in which the patented land was located.

A John WILKINSON was a witness to the will of George CLARKE of Charles County, MD, dated July 30, 1683 and probated on November 22, 1684. The other witnesses were Cleborne LOMAX and Joseph WOLPH. The beneficiaries under the will were Francis ADAMS, William FROST, John GODSHALL and Richard HALL (the testator?s godson and son of Richard and Mary HALL). The compiler does not know whether John WILKINSON was related to the Thomas WILKINSON mentioned in Cavaliers and Pioneers.]

(7) Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers - Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants?1666-1695, Richmond, VA: Virginia State Library, 1977, vol. 2:

P. 287:

MR. ROBERT RUFFIN, 2250 acs. Surry Co., in Lawnes Cr. Par., 20 Apr. 1685, p. 439. About ¼ mi. S of road from Augustine Huniccutt?s to Sunken Marsh Mill, cor. of Joseph Rogers? 500 acs.; by Mr. William Newsome; to sd. Rogers? Pokatinck land, by Bowling Green Sw; & Holly Bush Sw; to 917 ac. patt. of Mr. Georg Watkins, dated 1 Mar 1666, now in possession of sd. Ruffin; &c. Trans of 55 pers: Jno. Waddy, Tho. Carrill, Jane Bell, Wm. Butler, Walter Handam, EIIin Jones, Ed. Millington, Wm. Davis, Isabell Jones, Ed. Moss, James Collier, Owen Evans, Jno. Murry, Xpher. Anderson, Joseph Kelley, Jno. Treby (?), Terry Carter, Ed. Fen (?), Ed. Dyer, James Tayler, Charles Dyas, Jeremy Jones, John Debue, WM. FROST, Adam Caster (or Carter), John Bush, Robt. Minor, Abraham Willis, Ellin Adams, Robt. Elliot, Ed. Fen, Joseph Jones, Wm. Hunter, Gesper Kelly, Fra. Ellis, Paul Peters, Wm. Evans, Ellin Carter, Edwin Kerby, Geo. Foster, Fra. Collins, Eliza. Jenkins, Edwd. Baptist, 1 Negro. [Capitalization of WM. FROST added by compiler.] 
FROST, William (I14795)
 
25215 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or chrisening of Ann TURNEY. However, according to the 1841 census, she was 36 years of age as of 6 June 1841, the enumeration date of the 1841 census. TURNEY, Ann (I35973)
 
25216 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Isaac WOODFORD.

(2) Keith, Charles Penrose, The Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison: President of the United States of America, 1889-1893, Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1893, p. 25:

Isaack [WOODWARD] dyed young. 
WOODWARD, Isaac (I40032)
 
25217 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of John SADLER.

(2) John SADLER is mentioned in the will of his father, Peter SADLER, dated 14 September 1722. 
SADLER, John (I38697)
 
25218 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of John SADLER. SADLER, John (I38704)
 
25219 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Judith HUNT. However, the compiler assumes that Judith was born after her parents were married to each other on 28 March 1643.
 
HUNT, Judith (I42830)
 
25220 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Mary WOODFORD.

(2) Keith, Charles Penrose, The Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison: President of the United States of America, 1889-1893, Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1893, p. 25:

Mary [WOODWARD] mar. to Thomas Eccleston of Winchelsey. 
WOODWARD, Mary (I40033)
 
25221 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Rachel WOODFORD.

(2) Keith, Charles Penrose, The Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison: President of the United States of America, 1889-1893, Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1893, p. 25:

Rachell Mar. to Giles Poulton of Lond. Mrchant. . . .

The will of Elizabeth Woodward . . . is dated August 3, 1631, and mentions her daughters . . . Poulton . . . and her "son Poulton". . . . 
WOODWARD, Rachel (I40037)
 
25222 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Sarah TURNEY. However, according to Sarah's marriage record, she was 21 years of age on 22 May 1834, when she married William DAVIS. TURNEY, Sarah (I35969)
 
25223 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Thamar SADLER.

(2) Thamar SADLER is mentioned in the will of her father, Peter SADLER, dated 14 September 1722. 
SADLER, Thamar (I38696)
 
25224 (1) The compiler has not found a record of the birth or christening of Thomas WOODWARD.

(2) Keith, Charles Penrose, The Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison: President of the United States of America, 1889-1893, Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1893, p. 25:

Thomas Wodward of Lincolns Inne dyed sans issue. 
WOODWARD, Thomas (I40059)
 
25225 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Abraham LINDSEY. Abraham LINDSEY is placed here as a son of Edmund LINDSEY and Elizabeth BEASLEY in order to stimulate further research.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Abraham Lindsey was born circa 1723, probably in Cecil County, Maryland. At this time, the parents of Abraham Lindsey are not known. Abraham may have been a son of Edmund Lindsey, Sr. Because Abraham Lindsey was born before Edmond Lindsey married Elizabeth Beasley, he may have been Edmond's son from a prior marriage. At this time, there is no evidence of a prior marriage for Edmond Lindsey, so Abraham's father could have been a different Lindsey male.

Abraham Lindsey owned land on Goose Creek in present day Loudoun County, Virginia for which he received a grant in 1745. He was a member of the Frederick County militia during the French and Indian War. Abraham left the Long Marsh area for South Carolina about 1762. That same year, Abraham obtained a grant for land along the Enoree River in present day Newberry County. Abraham Lindsey sold his Newberry County land in 1783, and he moved to Wilkes County, Georgia. Abraham Lindsey died in Wilkes County about 1824. . . .

Abraham had a son named John (b. abt. 1749), who lived in Laurens Co. SC, then Jackson Co, GA, and who died in Maury Co., TN in 1810. . . .

Another man believed to have been a son of Abraham Lindsey was Isaac Lindsey (b. ca. 1745), who owned land adjacent to Abraham in Newberry County. Isaac Lindsey sold his Newberry County land in 1784, and he moved to York County, South Carolina.

Ezekiel Lindsey, who died in Laurens Co., SC ca. 1784 is also believed to have been a son of Abraham Lindsey. . . . 
LINDSEY, Abraham (I18302)
 
25226 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Abraham LINDSEY. Abraham LINDSEY is placed here as a son of Jacob LINDSEY, Sr. and Elizabeth ABRELL in order to stimulate further research.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Abraham Lindsey . . . lived in the same tax district in Wilkes Co. as Jacob Lindsey, Sr. Abraham first paid a poll tax there in 1804, indicating that he was born ca. 1783. Abraham later lived near Jacob Lindsey, Jr. in Jones Co., GA, where Jacob Jr. paid Abraham's property taxes in 1811. Abraham Lindsey and Jacob A. Lindsey were listed together on the 1828 tax list of Monroe Co., GA. Abraham was last on the census in Monroe Co. in 1830. On that census he was listed as between the age of 50-60. 
LINDSEY, Abraham (I39858)
 
25227 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Benjamin F. LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Benjamin F. Lindsey, Jr., b. 1824 Monroe County, Georgia, d. December 8, 1856 Dale County, Clopton, Alabama, m. Mary E Jordan, May 11, 1851, Crawford County, Georgia.

Benjamin may have been a brother to Jacob Abrell Lindsey, . . . whose father is believed to have been Abraham Lindsey of Wilkes Co., GA, b. ca. 1783. Abraham died sometime after 1830, probably in Monroe Co., GA. 
LINDSEY, Benjamin F. (I39863)
 
25228 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of David LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

David Lindsey b. ca. 1750, d. ca. 1836 in Shelby County, Alabama. David Lindsey married Mary Casey. David and Mary Casey Lindsey had the following children: Thomas, Rachel, Huldah, John, Lydia, Elizabeth, Elijah, David, Mary, Joseph, James, and Rebecca.

(3) Susan Grabek : See Note 2, above. 
LINDSEY, David (I39872)
 
25229 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of David LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

David Lindsey, born by 1728, was . . . an enigmatic figure in the area. He appeared in court on numerous occasions, almost always in litigation. David was in the Frederick Co. militia. He had a wife named Catherine. David may have leased land in the area because he did no citizen duties in Frederick Co. David appeared in a court record with Isaac Lindsey in 1770, indicating that they may have been related. By 1773, David had moved to the area that is now Greenbriar Co., WV. . . . Known children of David Lindsey are Robert, John Valentine, Sarah, Jane, and Rebecca. 
LINDSEY, David (I18304)
 
25230 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Elijah LINDSEY. Elijah LINDSEY is placed here as a son of Jacob LINDSEY, Sr. and Elizabeth ABRELL in order to stimulate further research.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Elijah Lindsey, b. by 1766, probably in Frederick Co., VA. Elijah first appeared in Wilkes Co., GA records in 1787. Elijah died ca. 1815 in Wilkes Co., leaving a widow, Dicey, and sons named John, Jacob, James, and Archibald. Elijah also had a daughter who married William Andres. . . .

Elijah Lindsey's father is believed to have been Jacob Lindsey Sr. of Frederick Co., VA and Wilkes Co., GA. . . .However, this relationship between Elijah Lindsey and Jacob Lindsey Sr. has not been proved.

(3) Susan Grabek :

Elijah Lindsey . . . died in Wilkes Co., GA ca. 1815, leaving a widow, Dicey, and sons named John, James, Jacob, and Archibald. . . . 
LINDSEY, Elijah (I39859)
 
25231 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Hezekiah LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Hezekiah Lindsay b. 1747 Pennsylvania, d. February 16, 1826 Clermont County, New Richmond, Ohio. Hezekiah Lindsay married Eliza Fisher d. ? Clermont County, New Richmond, Ohio.

Hezekiah Lindsey's name appeared on a 1770 deed in Frederick Co., VA. He was named as a co-owner of a tract of land along with Edmund Lindsey, Jr. Hezekiah lived in the Fort Pitt area during the Revolutionary War, where he served as a soldier in both the Virginia and Pennsylvania regiments. Hezekiah's marriage to Eliza Fisher is a speculation that has never been proved. 
LINDSEY, Hezekiah (I39868)
 
25232 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Isaac LINDSEY.

According to Susan Grabek :

We now have proof that Isaac Lindsey of York County, South Carolina was the father of Jacob Lindsey of Cobb County, Georgia. Jacob's wife, Elizabeth, applied for a widow's pension for Jacob's military service. In her application Elizabeth stated that she and Jacob were married in York County, South Carolina in 1813 by John Lindsey, a minister of the Gospel. Now we need to find proof that Isaac Lindsey was a son of Abraham Lindsey of Newberry County.

(3) Susan Grabek :

Isaac Lindsey [ca. 1745 - 183?] may . . . have been the father of Elisha Lindsey (ca. 1772-1820) of Spartanburg County, and the grandfather of Jacob Lindsey (ca. 1812-1880) of Spartanburg County. . . .

Isaac Lindsey received a grant for land in York County in 1784. He may have been the same man who had lived in Newberry County previously. An Isaac Lindsey received a grant for land in Newberry County in 1768 on Foster's Creek, a tributary of the Enoree River. Isaac Lindsey sold this land in Newberry County in 1785, so the timing is right for him to have been the same man who began to appear in York County records in 1785.

Abraham Lindsey of Newberry County owned land adjoining Isaac's land on Foster's Creek. Abraham Lindsey sold his land in Newberry County in 1783 and moved to Wilkes County, Georgia, where he died ca. 1824. Because Abraham and Isaac Lindsey lived next to each other in Newberry County, it would seem that they were close relatives, possibly father and son as I have hypothesized.

The names of Isaac Lindsey's wife and children are known from the 1817 York County will of Isaac's son, John Lindsey. . . . Isaac Lindsey of York County was married to Rachel. Isaac and Rachel had children named John (ca. 1772-1817), Elisha (ca. 1772-1820), Jacob (ca. 1788-1838), David (ca. 1790-1815), Druscilla (ca. 1780-?), Edy (ca. 1785-1853), and Fanna (ca. 1785-184?). Other Lindsey's who lived in York County who appear to have been closely related to Isaac Lindsey were Archibald Lindsey (ca. 1788 - 1860) and Ellender Lindsey (ca. 1790-?). Archibald Lindsey may have been a nephew of Isaac and Rachel Lindsey. Ellender may have been the widow of David Lindsey, a son of Isaac and Rachel Lindsey who died in 1815 while on military duty, or she may have been Archibald Lindsey's sister.

From John Lindsey's 1817 will and his probate record, it is known that Edy Lindsey married William Parker, Druscilla Lindsey married Thomas Wilson, and Fanna Lindsey married Thomas Putman. John Lindsey is buried in the Martin family burial ground in Cherokee County, as is his wife, Mary Lindsey, who died in 1816. Jacob Lindsey married Elizabeth Allen ca. 1812-1813 (per Elizabeth Lindsey's widow's pension file). Elisha Lindsey's wife was named Susannah.

Isaac Lindsey appeared in York County records from 1785-1820. He may have moved to Hall County, Georgia sometime after the 1820 census. An Isaac Lindsey of Hall County, Revolutionary War veteran, won land in the 1832 lottery. Jacob Lindsey, who lived in the same militia district in Hall County as Isaac Lindsey, also won land in the 1832 lottery. My guess is that Isaac and Jacob Lindsey were the father and son who had earlier lived in York Co., South Carolina. Isaac's lottery land reverted back to the state, so he must not have completed the paperwork to finalize his ownership. Perhaps Isaac died at about the time of the lottery. To date, no probate records have been found for Isaac Lindsey. There is a Revolutionary War file for Isaac Lindsey at the South Carolina Archives, but the file is empty. Bobby Gilmer Moss's book on South Carolina patriots does not list an Isaac Lindsey, so it seems that no record of Isaac Lindsey's Revolutionary War service exists, although he most certainly would have served as a soldier during the war. Isaac Lindsey has been a difficult man to pin down in records after 1820.

Elisha Lindsey, b. ca. 1772, a probable son of Isaac Lindsey, purchased land in Spartanburg County in 1794. He lived in Spartanburg County until 1819, when he died. Elisha Lindsey's probate record showed that he had a wife named Susannah and sons named Isaac, John, Jacob, and Elisha. Elisha Lindsey had daughters named Susannah, Elizabeth, Sarah, and El. Information from Lee family researcher, Margaret Beheler Jay, states that three of Elisha Lindsey's children married three of the children of John Watts Lee (b. ca. 1765 -1770) and his wife, Elizabeth Lands: Richard Lee married Sarah/Sally Lindsey, and Jeremiah Lee married Elizabeth Lindsey. Ms. Beheler's work also states that Susan Lee married a Lindsey. Researcher Scott Jones has determined that Susan Lee married Elisha Lindsey's son, John Lindsey.

(4) Susan Grabek :

Jacob Lindsey b. April 8, 1812 Spartanburg Co., SC, d. aft. 1860 Athens, Clarke Co., Georgia. It is believed, but not proved, that Jacob Lindsey was the son of Elisha Lindsey, b. ca. 1772 SC, d. 1819 Spartanburg Co., SC. Elisha Lindsey's probate record listed a wife, Susannah, and children named Isaac, John, Jacob, Elisha, Elizabeth, Susannah, Sally, and El. Jacob Lindsey married Nancy Hart. Jacob and Nancy Hart Lindsey had children named Susan, Elisha, Joseph S., Martha Ann, James K., William, Commodore R., John, Benjamin, Mary, George Wilson, Morgan M., and Elvira. L0018 descends from Commodore Lindsey.

The 1860 census for Spartanburg Co., SC listed Jacob Lindsey as J. L. Lindsey, age 47. Living with Jacob were his wife, Nancy (b. ca. 1819), and children named Susan (b. ca. 1836), Martha (b. ca. 1841 ), James (b. ca. 1843 ), William (b. ca. 1845), Commander (b. ca. 1847), John (b. ca. 1849), Benjamin (b. ca. 1852), Wilson (b. ca. 1853), and Mary (b. ca. 1855). Additional children of Jacob Lindsey from family tree information at Rootsweb (database penny0608) are sons named Elisha b. ca. 1838, Joseph S. b. ca. 1839, George W. b. 1860, and Morgan M. b. 1862. An additional daughter from family tree information is Elvira b. ca. 1857.

In 1965, Martin Van Buren Lindsey (b. 1879, a grandson of Jacob Lindsey) made a complete listing of Jacob Lindsey's family record. Martin listed Jacob Lindsey, borned April 8th, 1812, and wife Nancy Hart, borned Nov. 6th, 1819. Martin gave their marriage date as about 1834. Then he listed their children and their birthdates: Susan Lindsey - 12 Mar 1836, Elisha Lindsey - 7 Apr 1838, Joseph S. Lindsey - 7 Mar 1839, Martha Lindsey - 8 Jun 1841, James K Lindsey - 8 Apr 1843, Wm. K. Lindsey - 1 Dec 1844, C. R. Lindsey - 8 Sep 1846, Jno. H. Lindsey - 15 Jan 1848, Ben. J. P. Lindsey - 8 Feb 1850, A. W. Lindsey - 12 Mar 1852, Mary Lindsey - 22 Jan 1854, Elvira Lindsey - 21 Feb 1857, G. W. Lindsey - 20 Jul 1860, M. M. Lindsey - 22 Jun 1862. 
LINDSEY, Isaac (I39884)
 
25233 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Jacob LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Jacob Lindsey, b. ca. 1780-1790 South Carolina, d. ca. 1838 Cobb Co., GA. Jacob married Elizabeth, b. ca. 1798 in SC. Children of Jacob and Elizabeth Lindsey included David, b. 1815 SC; Lawson H., b. ca. 1820 SC; Jackson J., b. ca. 1831 GA; Green Augustus, b. ca. 1838 GA; and a daughter Lucinda, b. ca. 1827, who married Lawson Kiser. . . .

Jacob Lindsey may have been a son of Isaac Lindsey of York Co., SC. Jacob was named as a brother of John Lindsey in his 1817 York Co. will. In the will, John also named Elisha as a brother, and he named Isaac and Rachel as his parents. 
LINDSEY, Jacob (I39871)
 
25234 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of John LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

John Lindsey b. 1847 Texas, d. ca 1906 Lincoln Parish, Vienna, Louisiana.

John Lindsey may have been a son of Thomas Lindsey, b. ca. 1826. Thomas Lindsey was enumerated on the 1860 census for Cass Co., TX. Among the children of Thomas on the census was a son listed as J. Lindsey, age 9. Thomas Lindsey died in 1862 near Bastrop Parish, LA. Thomas was a son of John Lindsey, b. ca. 1777. . . . 
LINDSEY, John (I39882)
 
25235 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Joshua LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Joshua Lindsey b. 1799 Kentucky, d. bef. 1855 White County, Indiana, married Sarah (Sally) Johnson, March 8, 1823 in Lawrence Illinois. The children of Joshua Lindsey & Sarah Johnson were Sally, Martha, Mary, John, Elizabeth, Louisa, Joshua, George M., Samuel and William Tipton Lindsey.

The parents of Joshua Lindsey are believed to have been Joshua Lindsey Sr. (b. about 1770) and Elizabeth Findley (b. 1773). Elizabeth's father was John Findley, a Revolutionary War soldier who lived in the Fort Pitt area of present day Pittsburgh. It is thought that Joshua Sr. must have met and married Elizabeth in the Fort Pitt area before migrating to Kentucky about 1791. The family moved to Indiana about 1800, where Joshua died in Jackson County ca. 1818. 
LINDSEY, Joshua Sr (I39870)
 
25236 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Stephen LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Stephen Lindsey b. ca 1775 Virginia, d. Sept. 7, 1864 Fulton County, Illinois, married Rachel Reynolds Dec. 1798 in Campbell County, Kentucky. The children of Stephen Lindsey & Rachel Reynolds were, Nathan (b. circa 1802 KY), James (died circa age 18), Jonah (b. Ohio), Jacob, Phoebe (m. Mr. Lovell), Reuben, Stephen, Hannah (m. Mr. Stoops) & Hezekiah. The migration path for Stephen Lindsey (1775 VA - 1864 IL) was his marriage and time in Campbell County, Kentucky to Clermont County, Ohio to Fulton County, Illinois. In an October 17, 1843 deposition by Stephen Lindsey (1775 VA - 1864 IL), he states, in 1782, he went to live, at age 7 or 8, with his maternal aunt, Ruth Beasley Dollar & her husband William Dollar, in Berkeley County, Virginia. Inferring the maiden name of Beasley, for the mother of Stephen Lindsey, provides a possibly connection to Edmond Lindsey (Long Marsh-now Clarke County, Virginia Lindseys), b. 1697 who married Elizabeth Beasley in Baltimore Co. MD in 1724. This could imply that Edmond Lindsey & Elizabeth Beasley were the grandparents or great-uncle/aunt of Stephen Lindsey.

(3) Susan Grabek : See Note 2, above. 
LINDSEY, Stephen (I39865)
 
25237 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Thomas Jefferson LINDSEY. Thomas Jefferson LINDSEY is placed here as a son of Jacob LINDSEY, Sr. and Elizabeth ABRELL in order to stimulate further research.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Thomas Jefferson Lindsey b. Jan. 21, 1791 Wilkes County, Georgia, d. Oct. 2, 1861 Brownsboro, Texas, m. Bathsheba Sudduth. It is believed that the father of Thomas Jefferson Lindsey was Jacob Lindsey (1740-1818) who married Elizabeth Abrell.

Thomas Lindsey moved from Wilkes Co., GA to Tuscaloosa Co., Alabama in the early 1820's, before moving on to Mississippi and later to Texas, where he died.

It is possible that Thomas Lindsey was the son of Thomas Lindsey Sr., born circa 1766, a Revolutionary War soldier from South Carolina who died in Wilkes Co., GA before 1820 leaving a widow Mary, and children named Thomas, Abraham, William, Phoebe, Elizabeth, Charlotte, Rhoda, and Mary. Several of the children of Thomas Lindsey Sr. moved to Tuscaloosa Co., Alabama, including Abraham, Phoebe, Rhoda, and Mary, who all married in Tuscaloosa Co. Abraham Lindsey married Mary Traweek in 1829, Phoebe Lindsey married James Suddeth in 1847, Rhoda Lindsey married Cornelius Roberts in 1828, and Mary Lindsey married Richard Files in Tuscaloosa Co. in 1828. In 1830, the heirs of Thomas Lindsey Sr., asked Thomas Lindsey of Tuscaloosa Co. to act as their agent to sell lottery land in Troup Co., GA for them. Thomas might have been one of the heirs, himself.

(3) www.findagrave.com:

Thomas Jefferson Lindsey
Birth: Jan. 21, 1791, Wilkes County, Georgia, USA
Death: Oct. 2, 1861, Homer, Angelina County, Texas, USA

Family links: Spouse: Bethshebe Suddith Lindsey (1791 - 1865); Children: James Sudduth Lindsey (1811 - 1852)

Inscription: War of 1812 Veteran

Burial: Old Rock Hill Cemetery, Henderson County, Texas, USA

Maintained by: SWF
Originally Created by: Wayne Smith
Record added: Oct 25, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 60617450 
LINDSEY, Thomas Jefferson (I39857)
 
25238 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Thomas LINDSEY, Sr.

(2) Susan Grabek :

There is speculation that Thomas [Lindsey] may have been the son of Edmund Lindsey Sr. (b. 1697). Because Thomas sometimes signed his name Thomas Jr. there is also speculation that he was the son of a man named Thomas Lindsey who lived in Cecil Co., MD.

(3) Susan Grabek :

Thomas Lindsey may have been a son of Edmond Lindsey, Sr. He was a constable, juryman, and road overseer in Frederick Co. Thomas married first Mary, and second, Elizabeth. Thomas Lindsey sometimes signed his name Thomas Jr. despite being the oldest known Thomas Lindsey in the county. Thomas died in 1769. His will named his wife, Elizabeth, and children John, Thomas, Abraham, James, and Mary Turner. Thomas' will also named his sons-in-law Nathaniel Barrett (married to Abigail Lindsey), and Richard Allen (married to Nancy Lindsey). A book about Thomas Lindsey was written by Ferrell A. Brown. . . .

Thomas Lindsey's son, John (b. 1746), married Sarah Abrell, the sister of Elizabeth Abrell (married to Jacob Lindsey Sr.). John and Sarah Lindsey moved to Pickaway Co., Ohio about 1811. Some of their sons migrated to Pickaway Co. with them. . . .

(4) Lindsay, Margaret Isabella, The Lindsays of America, Albany, NY: Joel Munsell's Sons, 1889, p. 229:

BERRYVILLE.

(Clark[e] County, formerly Frederick County.)

From the tradition in this family of its ancestry, I am strongly led to believe that it is connected in a collateral way with the Northumberland and Fairfax Lindsays. The tradition is that in 1740, two brothers, Thomas and John Lindsay, removed from some part of the lower Potomac, possibly Northumberland, and bought and settled here an immense tract of land known then, as now, as Longmarsh, and were called wealthy farmers of the Shenandoah valley, and that they had a sister who married a Hierome Lindsay Opie, an ancestor, probably, of the Hierome Lindsay Opie who owned a large and elegant farm near Berryville in 1850.

These said two brothers were contemporary with Robert Lindsay of Northumberland, who removed from there and settled in Fairfax county about 1743, and it is barely possible that the three were brothers, sons of the one father, Opie Lindsay of Northumberland.

(5) O'Dell, Cecil, Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia, Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing Company, 1995, pp. 215-216:

Thomas Lindsay (b. 1720 c., probably a son of Edmond) had purchased 300 acres from [Nathaniel] Daugherty by 1748. On 16 April 1751, he acquired 345 acres from his attorney John Lindsay. He received a Fairfax grant for 255 acres on 22 November 1754. He willed this land (located on Little Cacapon in Hampshire County) to his son James, who was under 20 years of age. He received one other Fairfax grant on 27 July 1761 for 318 acres located on Long Marsh Run, adjacent north of the 860-acre survey. . . . This land is located on Clarke County Highway 611 and 639. Thomas and his wife Elizabeth sold 89 acres of the 318 acres to Edmond Lindsay Jr. on 1 November 1765 for 20 pounds. He willed the remaining 574 acres from his Long Marsh Run land to his sons John, Thomas Jr. and Abraham Lindsay.

Thomas Sr. was deceased by 6 August 1769 when his will (written 1 May 1769) was proved in Frederick County Court. He left horses to his son-in-law Nathaniel Barrett and son-in-law Richard Allen.

He also left 20 pounds to his daughter Mary Turner living in Carolina. His wife Elizabeth and son John Lindsay were named executors. The witnesses to the will were George Hampton, Jacob Larew, Thomas Blakemore and Jacob Lindsey.

Thomas Lindsay Jr. received two Fairfax grants on 30/31 March 1761. One was for 399 acres on Opequon Creek in present-day Jefferson County, and the other for 405 acres across the Opequon and west in Berkeley County, West Virginia. . . . The Berkeley County tract is on Silver Springs Run and Speck's Run. . . . In 1763 and 1764, Thomas and his wife Mary sold this land in four 200-acre parcels to Mercer Babb, Thomas Green, Isaac Lindsay and Benjamin Blackburn for 100 pounds each. The four men each received land on both sides of Opequon Creek.

(6) Brown, Ferrell A., The Lindseys: A Genealogy of Thomas and Mary Lindsey and Their Descendants, Point Lookout, MO: School of Ozarks Press, 1970, pp. xii-xiii, 1-3:

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THOMAS LINDSEY, 1769

IN THE NAME of God Amen The Twenty First day of May One thousand seven hundred and sixty Nine I Thomas Lindsey Frederick County in the Colony of Virginia, makes [sic] this Last Will and Testament I Humbly Resign my soul to God my Creator in Hopes through the merits of Jesus Christ my Saviour to Receive Pardon of my sins and Everlasting Life and Leave my Body to be Buried in Christian manner at the Discreation [sic] of my Executors Imprimis I give to my son John Lindsey the upper Part of my Land where I now live on Joining to Edmund Lindsey extending one Hundred Poles down the marsh and the same at each end Item I Give to my son Thomas Lindsey the Plantation where I now live on Extending one Hundred Poles down the marsh and the same at each end Item I Give to my son Abraham Lindsey the lower Part of my Land where I now live on extending one hundred Poles to Isaac Larews [sic] Line Item I give to my son James Lindsey my Tract of Land in Hampshire County on Little Capecapon Item I Give to my son in law Nathaniel Baret three Breeding Mares such as my Executors shall choose Also I Give to Nathaniel Baret the Bay horse he now has and three Cows such as my Executors shall choose Item I Give to my son in law Richard Allen the Mares he now has in Possession and three more Breeding Mares such as my Executors shall choose also I Give to Richard Allen four young Cows also I Give to Richard Allen Seven Pounds to Buy a Feather Bed Item I Give to my Daughter Mary Turner Living in Carolina Twenty Pounds to be Raised out of my Estate Item I Give to my Wife Elizabeth Lindsey the use of my Negroman Fortune and my Negro wench Rachiel until my son James Lindsey arrives to the age of Twenty Years and During that time my three youngest sons to be supported out of the Profits of the Negros [sic] at the Discretion of my Executors it is my Will that my three sons John Lindsey Abraham Lindsey and Thomas Lindsey each of them shall give my son James Lindsey fifteen pounds apiece as they Can agree with him when he Comes of age Item Give all my horse Kind Cattle and Hogs to be equally Divided Between my Four sons John Lindsey Abraham Lindsey Thomas Lindsey and James Lindsey It is my Will that when my son James Lindsey arrives at the age of Twenty Years that my Negros [sic] to be sold to anyone or Two of my sons and divide the money equally among It is my Will that my Waggon [sic] and Team to be kept for the use of my Family. I give my Household furniture to be Divided amongst all my Children Share and Share alike. I make my Wife Elizabeth Lindsey and my son John Lindsey Executors of this my Last Will and Testament. Whereof I Have Hereunto Subscribed my Name.

THOMAS LINDSEY

Signed and Published by the above named Thomas Lindsey as his Last Will and Testament

George Hamson
Jacob Lerew
Thomas Blakemore
Jacob Lindsey

At a Court Held for Frederick County August 1st 1769 This Last Will and Testament of Thomas Lindsey Deceased was Proved by the oaths of the Witnesses thereto and ordered to be Recorded and upon the motion of John Lindsey one of the Executors therein named who made oath thereto Certificate is granted him for obtaining a Probate thereof in due form whereupon he Together with Edward Snickers and Humphrey Wells his securities entered into and Acknowledged a Bond in the Penalty of One thousand Pounds conditioned for their faithful Administration of the said Decedents Estate Elizabeth the Widow came into Court and Refused to Accept the Provision made for Her by the same which is ordered to be Recorded.

By the Court

J. A. Keith, Clerk

Leslie Anders, Frederick County, Virginia, Will Book, No. 3, p. 502.

THE LINDSEYS . . .

THOMAS LINDSEY. It is thought that he was born a. 1721 in Virginia. His will was dated 21 May, 1769 and probated 1 August, 1769 in Frederick County, Virginia. He m. (1) a. 1743 to Mary Frost, b. 1723 in Clarke Co., Va., d. 28 May, 17___ in Frederick Co., Va., m. (2) to Elizabeth _____ a. 1765. He died __ July, 1769.

Children of Thomas and Mary, surname LINDSEY: . . .

i. Mary . . .

ii. John, b. 6 August, 1716 . . .

iii. A daughter . . .

iv. A daughter . . .

v. Abraham, b. 25 May, 1750 . . .

vi. Thomas . . .

vii. James, b. 20 April, 1759

Thomas Lindsey lived in that part of Frederick County (now Clarke County) Virginia on Longmarsh, a branch of the Shenandoah River where his children were born.

The Longmarsh Section is in the northwest corner of Clarke County near the West Virginia line. There is at this time a voting precinct called Longmarsh.

There is nothing in the records of Frederick County, Virginia, to show where Thomas Lindsey lived prior to coming to Frederick County.

Our family history says, "Our older Lindseys lived on the Rappahannock, near the Potomac, in Northumberland County, Virginia."

From the Frederick County records, we find the first mention of Thomas Lindsey was where he was made constable in 1744.

There is is a Presbyterian church near the headwater of Bull Skin that is near Summit, West Virginia, and Thomas Lindsey was once appointed overseer of the road from the head of Bull Skin to Pennington Marsh.

We know nothing of the appearance or characteristics of Thomas Lindsey, but a description of his first wife, Mary Frost, has come down to us.

"She was remarkable for her beauty, her heavy suite of raven black hair which came to the calves of her legs, her very white complexion and wondrous dark eyes. She was of Welsh descent."

It has been said that the dark eyes of our branch of Lindseys came down from the Frosts. Lindseys are usually blue or gray eyed.

DEEDS

Deed Book 2, Frederick Co., Va., April 16,1751.

John Lindsey to Thomas Lindsey, tract of certain parcel of land being part of a tract of land patent bearing date 2 day April, 1751.

Granted to John Lindsey, adjoining Edmund Lindsey on north side of Long Marsh, containing 345 acres.

Deed Book 8, p. 231. Feb. 27,1763.

Land: Lease on both sides of Opeckon Creek, part of Thornas Lindsey grant.

Thomas Lindsey to Mercer Babbs, signed by Thomas Lindsey, Jr., and Mary his wife. Witnesses none. Release not signed Jr.

Deed Book 8, p. 235. Feb. 27,1763.

Land: Lease on both sides of Opeckon Creek, part of Thomas Lindsey grant.

Thomas Lindsey to Thomas Green, signed by Thomas Lindsey and Mary his wife.

Deed Book 8, p. 239. Feb. 27, 1763.

Land: Lease on both sides of Opeckon Creek, part of Thomas Lindsey grant.

Thomas Lindsey to Isaac Lindsey, signed by Thomas Lindsey and Mary his wife.

Deed Book 9, p. 340. June 8, 1764.

Land: Lease on both sides of Opeckon Creek, part of Thomas Lindsey grant.

Thomas Lindsey to Benjamin Blackburn, signed by Thomas Lindsey, Jr., and Mary his wife. Witnesses: John McMackin, Joseph Edwards, Jr., Henry Heth, and Geo. Myles. Release also signed Thomas Lindsey, Jr.

Deed Book 11, p. 69. Nov. 1, 1765.

Land: Lease 89 acres (part of 318 acre grant to Thomas Lindsey).

Thomas Lindsey, Sr., to Edmund Lindsey, Jr., signed by Thomas Lindsey and Elizabeth, his wife. Witnesses: Thos. Speake, Jas. Lindsey, and Wm. Bennet.

It proved by the these deeds that Thomas Lindsey had two wives. He was married to Mary Frost, a. 1743. Mary wife of Thomas, was alive June 8, 1764, but died before November 1, 1765 as Thomas had wife Elizabeth at that time.

He signed his name Lindsey at all times. He signed his name Thomas Lindsey, Jr., in two deeds by which it might be inferred his father's name was also Thomas. In that day and time, however, this was not necessarily so.

Two hundred years ago, the term Senior and Junior did not as a rule imply the relationship of father and son. The men had as a rule only one given name and there were often several men in a town with exactly the same name.

In order to distinguish one from another the another in the group assumed the title Senior, the others Junior, 3rd, 4th etc.

When Senior died, Junior changed his name to Senior. In this mix-up George Clarke. Jr., might have a son Henry Clarke, Sr.

So it seems, Thomas, even though he signed Junior after his name may not have the same given name as his father.

However I have wondered if Thomas Edmund Lindsey (usually written Edmund) first found in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1733 may not have been our Thomas' father.

There is nothing in the Frederick County records, to prove relationship of the Lindseys first found in Frederick County: Edmond or Edmund, John, James, Thomas, Isaac or Abraham.

LAND GRANTS

1754 - Book "H", p. 583. Frederick Co., Va., Nov. 28, 1754.

To Thomas Lindsey, land in Hampshire Co., on both sides of Little Cacapehon, 255 acres.

1761 - Book "K", P. 262. Frederick Co., Va., March 30, 1761.

To Thomas Lindsey of Frederick County, 399 acres in Hampshire Co., on west side of Opeckon Creek.

1761 - Frederick Co., Va., July 27, 1761.

To Thomas Lindsey of Frederick County, 318 acres on Long Marsh, a branch of the Shenandoah River.

GRANTS

Part of a survey of land containing more than a thousand acres granted by Fairfax to John Lindsey in April, 1751 and conveyed by Lindsey to his eldest son Thomas in the same month and year.

The part conveyed to Thomas Lindsey contained 345 acres. Other parts of the whole survey were conveyed by John Lindsey in the same year to James and Edmund Lindsey, brothers of Thomas, to Isaac Larue and in 1756 to Speake.

A smaller tract of 245 acres granted by Lord Fairfax to John Lindsey in 1762 was also conveyed to his son Thomas. This smaller tract adjoined the 345 acre tract on the South and adjoined George William Fairfax's land.

Thomas Lindsey died in July, 1769. In December, 1784 the eldest son John Lindsey and Abraham his brother sold to Albion Throckmorton of Berkeley Co., W. Va., 294 acres described as adjoining Isaac Larue and Warner Washington.

Albion Throckmorton was a son-in-law of Warner Washington, Sr., having married Mildred Washington.

Since it has been proved by records that the same John Lindsey, Gent. moved to Berkeley County, South Carolina, and left his will there dated August 9, 1783, proved September 6, 1787 and left a living son, Thomas, it would appear that Mr. Curtis Chappelear was in error in stating Thomas who died in July, 1769, was the son of John Lindsey.

It seems almost certain that John was a brother of Thomas although there is a possibility John may have been Thomas' uncle. John and Abraham, brothers mentioned in the Historical Society of Clark County, Virginia, Vol. viiii were sons of Thomas, will of 1769.

Among those giving military and material aid to the Frederick Co., Va. Militia (French-Indian War 1759-1763) were Thomas Lindsey 4 S; Isaac Lindsey 39 S; and Thomas Lindsey and Isaac Lindsey 9 S each.

In the Colonial Wars in Frederick Co., Va. "were Thomas Lindsey, Capt. John Lindsey, John Lindsey, Abraham Lindsey, James Lindsey, Edmund (also Edmond or Edward) Lindsey and Isaac Lindsey."

In the militia records for September 2, 1755, Isaac Lindsey was listed in Capt. Thomas Speake's Co., Thomas Lindsey, Jr., Abraham Lindsey, John Lindsey, Jr., and Edmund Lindsey, Jr., were in Capt. John Hardin's Co., and David Lindsey in Marquis Calmes [sic] Company.

In the Virginia Colonial Militia lists Edward Linsey, Frederick Co. Va., Sept. 1758, Isaac Linsey, Frederick Co., Va., Sept. 1758 and Thomas Linsey, Frederick Co., Va., Sept 1758.

In Cartmell's History of Old Frederick County lists as 'minute men' of Frederick Co., Va., 1758 Edward Linsey, Isaac Linsey and Thomas Linsey.

The Allens, Barretts and Turners were all found in the James City Co., section during he time of John Lindsey of James City County (1660's); also the Alexanders, Byrans, Martins and Rosses were in Frederick Co., Virginia during John and Thomas Lindsey's time of residence there, which may indicate the Lindseys came from this section.

(7) Brown, Stuart E., Annals of Clarke County, Virginia, Berryville, VA: Virginia Book Co., 1983, vol. I, pp. 363-378:

SOME DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS LINDSEY (CA. 1721/1769) AND HIS WIFE, THE FORMER MARY FROST

Lindsey-Lindsay

NOTE: Emily Lindsay (Mrs. James Beemer Lindsay) tells me that her husband and his two brothers, and their families used the "ay" spelling as did George Winston Lindsay (grandson of Dr. James and Sarah Berry Lindsey) and his family.

She further tells me that these early users of the "ay" spelling were advised that it was the proper Scottish spelling (as opposed to the English "ey" spelling), and it was their understanding that their Lindsey-Lindsay forbears came from Scotland.

Thomas Lindsey (ca. 1721-1769) (Fdk. Co. WB 3/502). It is believed that he was of the second generation of Lindseys to live in Frederick County, and that the Lindseys either came from Northumberland County, Virginia, or from Pennsylvania. He m. (1st.) (ca. 1740-45) Mary Frost of Frederick County. (Fdk. Co. DB 8/235 - Deed made by Thomas and wife Mary. It is tradition that she was a Frost, this information being handed down in the family of his and her son Abraham), m. (2nd.) (ca. 1765) Elizabeth _____, (Fdk. Co. DB 11/69 - Deed made by Thomas and wife Elizabeth). Thomas served in the Frederick County Militia in 1758, (See Hening's STATUTES, Soldiers from Frederick County, 1758), Thomas (1) had a son Thomas, who m. Mary Reagan.

[Children:] . . .

[i] John Lindsey, b. 8/6/1746 (Chalkley's Augusta County Records, Vol. II, P. 34), "Longmarsh", Frederick County, d. 1835, Pickaway County, Ohio, m. (8/9/1772) Sarah Abrell, dau. of John and Elizabeth Abrell (Will of John Abrell, WB 1/3, Berkeley County, W. Va.). They sold their land on Longmarsh, Frederick County, to Clarice Larue in 1811 (Fdk. Co. D.B. 33/345, Deed dated 8/7/1811), and moved to Ross County, Ohio. All of their children b. "Longmarsh". . . .

[ii] Abraham Lindsey, b. ca. 1750, Frederick County, d. 1837, Kentucky. Entered the Revolutionary War from Frederick County as an ensign in Lt. Col. Marquis Calmes' Company, later as Lieutenant, serving 4 years, 6 months in the 2nd Va. Regiment. M. (in Va.) Elizabeth Frost, and they went to Kentucky ca. 1791. She d. 1820-30, Butler County, Ky. . . .

[iii] Thomas Lindsey, b. ca. 1752-1758, d. ca. 1807 in Frederick County, m. (8/14/1786, Frederick County), Mary Reagan. . . .

[iv] Mary Lindsey, b. Frederick County, m. _____ Turner. They lived in South Carolina . . . .

[v] _____ Lindsey (dau.) m. Nathaniel Barret. (He may be the one mentioned on old Size Roll 1756 in Northumberland County, Va., age 20.) . . .

[vi] Nancy Lindsey, m. Richard Allen. (He may be the one on personal tax list 1782, King William County. Also tax list 1817-18. Same county tax list 1822-29, shows a Richard M. Allen, and 1832-50 a Lindsey Allen - might be grandsons of Thomas.) From the pension papers of Richard Allen of North Carolina - Richard Allen m. Nancy Lindsay in Frederick County, between 1763-1770. Had a son Thomas Allen and seven other children not named in this pension application. He was 90 years old on 9/4/1832, when one of the papers was written. He was b. 11/26/1741, in Baltimore County, Md., and was 21 years old when he moved to Frederick County. From another source, probably Wheeler's HISTORICAL SKETCH (N.C.), the names of Richard Allen's children are given as follows: John (not mentioned in will); Thomas; James; Jesse, b. 1771, N.C.; William, b. 1773, N.C.; Mary; Elizabeth, b. 1781; Sarah; and Richard, b. 1786, N.C. Three Hampton females m. into this family. . . .

[vii] James Lindsey (1759-2/4/1824) bur. Centerville, Ohio, m. (1st.) Eleanor _____, (2nd.) (12/20/1812) Priscilla Stubblefield, widow of Beverly W. Stubblefield (and mother of Susannah Stubblefield, who m. Thomas Lindsey, son of Thomas Lindsey and Mary Reagan). Served as Lieut. in Revolution (from SOLDIERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION WHO LIVED IN THE STATE OF OHIO - Official DAR Roster 1938 - Vol. 2 - "James Lindsey - Champaign Co. - Ent. 1775 in eng. Regt. Va. Line, Capt. Alexander; pensr. 9/9/1819 Champaign Co. About 60 yrs. old. Mar. Priscilla Stubblefield 1/1812, he d. 2/4/1824. Ref W254476 B.L.Wt. 44933-160-55 Va. Widow m. John Thomas 5/10/1826; he d. 2/19/1846, and she applied for pens. in Champaign Co., O. 1856").

(8) Thomas LINDSAY was the grantee in a land patent dated 22 November 1754 covering 195 acres of land in Hampshire County, VA [now WV]. See the following information in Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants/Northern Neck Grants and Surveys :

URL: http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=583&last=&g_p=GH&co llection=NN Grant

Title: Lindsay, Thomas.

Publication: 22 November 1754.

Other Format: Available on microfilm. Northern Neck Grants, reels 288-311.

Note: Location: Hampshire County. Description: 255 acres on both sides of Little Cacapehon adjoining John Parker. Source: Northern Neck Grants H, p. 583 (Reel 293). Original survey exists. Part of the index to recorded copies of land grants issued by the agents of the Fairfax Proprietary between 1690 and 1781 and by the Commonwealth between 1786 and 1874. Original and recorded surveys are also indexed when available. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia.

Subject - Personal: Lindsay, Thomas, grantee. Parker, John.

Subject - Topical: Land titles - Registration and transfer - West Virginia - Hampshire County.

Subject - Geographic: Hampshire County (W. Va.) - History - 18th century.

Genre/Form: Land grants - West Virginia - Hampshire County. Surveys (land) - West Virginia - Hampshire County.

Added Entry: Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck grants, 1690-1874. Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck surveys, 1697, 1722-1781. Library of Virginia. Archives.

System Number: 000856807.

(9) Thomas LINDSEY was the grantee in a land patent dated 30 March 1761 covering 399 acres of land in Frederick County, VA. See the following information in Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants/Northern Neck Grants and Surveys :

URL: http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=262&last=&g_p=GK&co llection=NN Grant

Title: Lindsey, Thomas.

Publication: 30 March 1761.

Gen. note: (This deed was first issued in the name of Richard Fowler and is ent[e]red in Book H, folio 612 and cancelled &c.).

Other Format: Available on microfilm. Northern Neck Grants, reels 288-311.

Note: Location: Frederick County. Description: 399 acres on the west side of Opeckon. A note at the foot of the record in these words. Source: Northern Neck Grants K, 1757-1762, p. 262 (Reel 294). Original survey exists. (Filed under Richard Fowler) Part of the index to recorded copies of land grants issued by the agents of the Fairfax Proprietary between 1690 and 1781 and by the Commonwealth between 1786 and 1874. Original and recorded surveys are also indexed when available. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia.

Subject - Personal: Lindsey, Thomas, grantee. Fowler, Richard.

Subject - Topical: Land titles - Registration and transfer - Virginia - Frederick County.

Subject - Geographic: Frederick County (Va.) - History - 18th century.

Genre/Form: Land grants?Virginia?Frederick County. Surveys (land)?Virginia?Frederick County.

Added Entry: Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck grants, 1690-1874. Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck surveys, 1697, 1722-1781. Library of Virginia. Archives.

System Number: 000856824.

(10) Thomas LINDSEY was the grantee in a land patent dated 31 March 1761 covering 405 acres of land in Frederick County, VA. See the following information in Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants/Northern Neck Grants and Surveys :

URL: http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=263&last=&g_p=GK&co llection=NN Grant

Title: Lindsey, Thomas.

Publication: 31 March 1761.

Gen. note: (This deed was first drawn in the name of Richard Fowler and recorded Book H, folio 624 and cancelled &c.).

Other Format: Available on microfilm. Northern Neck Grants, reels 288-311.

Note: Location: Frederick County. Description: 405 acres on the east side of Opeckon, a note at the foot of the record in these words. Source: Northern Neck Grants K, 1757-1762, p. 263 (Reel 294). Original survey exists. (Filed under Richard Fowler) Part of the index to recorded copies of land grants issued by the agents of the Fairfax Proprietary between 1690 and 1781 and by the Commonwealth between 1786 and 1874. Original and recorded surveys are also indexed when available. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia.

Subject - Personal: Lindsey, Thomas, grantee. Fowler, Richard.

Subject - Topical: Land titles - Registration and transfer - Virginia - Frederick County.

Subject - Geographic: Frederick County (Va.) - History - 18th century.

Genre/Form: Land grants - Virginia - Frederick County. Surveys (land) - Virginia?Frederick County.

Added Entry: Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck grants, 1690-1874. Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck surveys, 1697, 1722-1781. Library of Virginia. Archives.

System Number: 000856825.

(11) Thomas LINDSEY was the grantee in a land patent dated 27 July 1761 covering 318 acres of land in Frederick County, VA. See the following information in Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants/Northern Neck Grants and Surveys :

URL: http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=307&last=&g_p=GK&co llection=NN Grant

Title: Lindsey, Thomas.

Publication: 27 July 1761.

Other Format: Available on microfilm. Northern Neck Grants, reels 288-311.

Note: Location: Frederick County. Description: 318 acres on the No side of Long Marsh. Source: Northern Neck Grants K, 1757-1762, p. 307 (Reel 294). Part of the index to recorded copies of land grants issued by the agents of the Fairfax Proprietary between 1690 and 1781 and by the Commonwealth between 1786 and 1874. Original and recorded surveys are also indexed when available. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia.

Subject - Personal: Lindsey, Thomas, grantee.

Subject - Topical: Land titles - Registration and transfer - Virginia - Frederick County.

Subject - Geographic: Frederick County (Va.) - History - 18th century.

Genre/Form: Land grants - Virginia - Frederick County.

Added Entry: Northern Neck Land Office. Northern Neck grants, 1690-1874. Library of Virginia. Archives.

System Number: 000856826.
 
LINDSEY, Thomas Sr. (I9241)
 
25239 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of the parents of Thomas LINDSEY.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Thomas Lindsey b. 1768 Montgomery County, Georgia, d. 1816 Kennaesaw, Georgia, buried Cook County, Georgia; married 1794, Hester Ann Clark (April 13, 1774 GA - July 4, 1874 Cook County, GA).

Thomas Lindsey may have been the son of Thomas Lindsey Senior, who petitioned for land in present day Burke County, Georgia in 1767. Thomas Lindsey Sr. died by 1784. His widow, Elizabeth, continued to live in Burke County, and received a grant for land there in 1794. Other Lindsey's found in Burke County in the 1790's were Thomas, Benjamin, and Kier. Thomas and Benjamin Lindsey of Burke County both won land in the the 1807 lottery, along with Martha Lindsey, who may have been the widow of Kier Lindsey.

Kier Lindsey might actually have been named Kiah (nickname for Hezekiah). It is possible that Thomas, Benjamin, and Kier Lindsey of Burke County may also have been Thomas, Benjamin and Hezekiah Lindsey, sons of Thomas Lindsey, who owned land in Wilkes County, Georgia in 1777. Thomas Lindsey died, and his heirs, Thomas, Benjamin, and Hezekiah Lindsey, and Elizabeth Lindsey Jenkins, brought a lawsuit in 1792 to recover the land that their father had owned in Wilkes County. 
LINDSEY, Thomas (I39883)
 
25240 (1) The compiler has not found satisfactory proof of the identity of this Mr. LINDSEY or his parents. LINDSEY, --- (I39869)
 
25241 (1) The compiler has not found, in the database "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," a record of the birth or christening of Daniel FROST. However, according to Beers, Josephine W. Beers and Prindle, Paul W., "Early Frost, Gray and Hobby Connections of England, Connecticut and Long Island," The American Genealogist, Vol. 64 (July 1989), p. 162:

DANIEL [FROST], bp. St Mary's, Nottingham, 17 Jan. 1612/3. . . .

(2) Wilson, Lynn Winfield, History of Fairfield County, Connecticut, Vol. I, Chicago, IL and Hartford, CT: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1929, pp. 62-63:

The first settlers who came with [Roger] Ludlow [to Fairfield, CT] were Thomas Staples, Thomas Newton, Edward Jessop, and Edmund Strickland. In September of this year, 1639, came William Frost, Daniel, his son, and John Gray, his son-in-law, who had come from Lynn, Mass., John Nichols of Stratford, John Foster, Francis Purdie, Henry Whelpley and Richard Wescott. This was the beginning of the settlement which for many years would be the chief town of Fairfield County.

(3) Jacobus, Donald Lines, History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Vol. I [reprint], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, pp. 211-212:

Frost, Daniel, s. of William.

He m. (1) _____; m. (2) Elisabeth Barlow, dau. of John, whose will 1674 called her Elizabeth Frost.

Will 23 Feb. 1682; wife Elizabeth; sons Daniel, Joseph, Isaac; daus. Rebecca Booth, Sarah Smith, Rachel Rumsey, Hannah Thorp, Hester Frost.

Inv. 15 Dec. 1684. Controversy 10 Mar. 1684/5 between Daniel Frost [Jr.] and Robert Rumsey, John Thorp and Samuel Smith, in right of their wives.

Inv. of Est. of Elizabeth Frost, 13 Aug. 1686; Robert Rumsey made oath. Agreement of heirs; two sons, Daniel and Joseph Frost; four sons-in-law Samuel Smith, Robert Rumsey, John Thorp, and Samuel Coley, who married four of her daus.

In 1663, Sarah Frost signed release to father Daniel for legacy from her gr. father William Frost; acknowledged 1682 as Sarah Smith. Simon Booth and Rebecca his wife of York County, Mass., released father Daniel Frost from paying a legacy from gr. father William Frost, received through Mr. James Hill of Boston.

Child [by first wife]:

[i] Rebecca, m. [5 Jan. 1663/4], Simon Booth, of York County, Me., and Enfield, Conn.

Children [by second wife] :

[ii] Sarah, m. in 1665, Samuel Smith.

[iii] Daniel.

[iv] Joseph.

[v] Rachel, m. Robert Rumsey.

[vi] Hannah, m. John Thorp.

[vii] Isaac, d. in 1684, unm. Will 23 Dec. 1684, proved 10 Mar. 1684/5; three sisters, Sarah Smith, Rachel Rumsey, Hannah Thorp; bro, Daniel and sister Esther Frost; cousin John, son of bro.-in-Iaw Samuel Smith, my sword; cousin Elizabeth Smith, dau. of same; residue to bro. Joseph. Inv. 26 Feb. 1684 [1684/5].

[viii] Esther, m. abt. 1685, Samuel Coley.

(4) Schenck, Elizabeth Hubbell, The History of Fairfield: Fairfield County, Connecticut, Vol. I, New York, NY: 1889, p. 368:

DANIEL I. s. of William Frost I. who settled near his father in the Frost Square, sold his house & home-lot of 31 acres to John Banks in 1648, & became one of the five Bankside farmers. His home-lot of ten acres at Bankside, was situated on Long Island Sound on the east side of Frost Point, & commanded one of the finest prospects of that beautiful region of country. He m. Elizabeth d. of John Barlow. Their children were Rebecca b. 1640, who m. 5 Jan. 1664 Simeon Booth; Daniel; Joseph; Isaac; Sarah who m. Samuel Smith; Rachel who m. Robert Rumsey; Hannah who m. John Thorp & Esther who m. _____.

(6) Beers, Josephine W. Beers and Prindle, Paul W., "Early Frost, Gray and Hobby Connections of England, Connecticut and Long Island," The American Genealogist, Vol. 64 (July 1989), p. 162:

DANIEL [FROST], bp. St Mary's, Nottingham, 17 Jan. 1612/3; mentioned in his father's will (1645); d. Fairfield bet. 23 Feb. 1682 and 15 Dec. 1684 (date of will and inventory): m. (1) _____, (2) ELIZABETH BARLOW (Fairfield Fams. 1:211). At the second marriage of his father, and at the marriage of his sister Mary, "Daniel Frost of Nottingham, cordwayner," served as bondsman.
 
FROST, Daniel I (I5408)
 
25242 (1) The compiler has not found, in the database "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," a record of the birth or christening of Samuel FROST. However, according to Beers, Josephine W. Beers and Prindle, Paul W., "Early Frost, Gray and Hobby Connections of England, Connecticut and Long Island," The American Genealogist, Vol. 64 (July 1989), p. 162:

SAMUEL [FROST] bp. 3 Oct. 1624; bur. St. Peter's 2 June 1631.
 
FROST, Samuel (I29171)
 
25243 (1) The compiler has not found, in the database "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," a record of the birth or christening of Susanna FROST. However, according to Beers, Josephine W. Beers and Prindle, Paul W., "Early Frost, Gray and Hobby Connections of England, Connecticut and Long Island," The American Genealogist, Vol. 64 (July 1989), p. 162:

SUSANNA [FROST] bp 4 June 1626; bur. St. Peter's 10 June 1626.
 
FROST, Susanna (I29172)
 
25244 (1) The compiler is not certain that Cynthia JENNINGS' husband was the Andrew HALES who was a son of Thomas HAIL of Newton County, GA. Cynthia is shown here as a wife of that Andrew HALES in order to stimulate further research. JENNINGS, Cynthia (I28925)
 
25245 (1) The compiler is not certain that Milley RHODES' husband was the John HAIL who was a son of Thomas HAIL of Newton County, GA. Milley is shown here as a wife of that John HAIL in order to stimulate further research. RHODES, Milley (I28924)
 
25246 (1) The compiler is not certain that the following information relates to the John MARCHANT who was buried in Hawkhurst, Kent, England on 12 December 1738:

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975:

Name: John Merchant
Gender: Male
Christening Date: 24 Mar 1677
Christening Place: Lamberhurst, Kent, England
Father's Name: William Merchant
Mother's Name: Mary
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C13153-1
System Origin: England-ODM
GS Film number: 992526

[Note by compiler: The information set forth above is placed here to stimulate further research. Lamberhurst is about 7 miles from Cranbrook, about 8 miles from Staplehurst, and about 7 miles from Hawkhurst.]

(2) England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991:

name: John Marchant
gender: Male
burial date: 12 Dec 1738
burial place: Parish Church of Hawkhurst, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
death date:
death place:
age:
birth date:
birthplace:
occupation:
race:
marital status:
spouse's name:
father's name:
father's birthplace:
mother's name:
mother's birthplace:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I01572-8
system origin: England-EASy
source film number: 1736725
reference number: item 3 p 98 
MARCHANT, John Sr. (I21780)
 
25247 (1) The compiler is not convinced that Anne PECK's husband was the Abraham FROST who was a son of William FROST. The latter Abraham FROST was in America no later than 1639, when he accompanied his father, William FROST, to Uncoway (Fairfield, CT). If the latter Abraham FROST married Anne PECK on 29 May 1651 at St. Peter's, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, he would have to have gone from America to England for the marriage, and thereafter returned from England to America.

(2) If Anne PECK's husband was the Abraham FROST who was a son of William FROST, she probably died before June 30, 1684, when Abraham FROST and his wife Susan were witnesses to the sale of land. See Frost, Josephine C., The Frost Genealogy, New York, NY: F. H. Hitchcock, 1912, pp. 335-336:

ABRAHAM FROST, figures in lawsuit in Hempstead, L. I., May 3, 1674. May 24, 1682, gives 10 shillings toward support of minister in same place. Oct. 17, 1681, buys woodland of Harmon Jonson, in Hempstead. April 9, 1685, sells the same, and wife Susan signs. March 9, 1693-4, Susan Frost, Isaac Frost, and John Hendricke sell to John Foster part of fifty acres purchased by "her husband Abraham Frost" of William Thickston, located in Foster's meadows. June 30, 1684, Abraham and Susan witness to sale of land.

[Note by compiler: As of 30 June 1684, this Abraham FROST's wife was named Susan, not Anne.]
 
PECK, Anne (I34187)
 
25248 (1) The compiler is uncertain as to the order of Ella Minnie STARNES' first and middle names; i.e., whether her name was Ella Minnie or Minnie Ella. In any event, she went by the name Ella.

(2) California, Death Index, 1940-1997 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000:

Name: Ella M Testerman
Birth Year: abt 1892
Death Date: 10 Dec 1937
Age at Death: 45
Death Place: San Luis Obispo, California, USA

(3) www.findagrave.com:

Ella M Testerman
Birth: 1892
Death: 1937

Burial: Paso Robles District Cemetery, Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County, California, USA
Plot: 44 14

Created by: Ron West
Record added: Aug 18, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 95539604 
STARNES, Ella Minnie (I40313)
 
25249 (1) The compiler knows of no direct evidence that Charles Claiborne STARNES was a son of Peter STARNES, Sr. However, the compiler's working hypothesis is that Charles Claiborne STARNES was a son of Peter STARNES, Sr. See also Note (10), below. It is not clear whether Claiborne was C. C.'s first name or his middle name. Since C. C. is listed as Charles STARNES in the 1870 census of the 7th District of Coffee County, TN, and since other members of C. C.'s family went by their middle names, the compiler has chosen to list C. C. as Charles Claiborne STARNES.

(2) Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas, Chicago, IL: F. A. Battey & Co., 1889, p. 786:

Clayborn C. [STARNES] was born June 22, 1810, in Tennessee, where he has resided all his life, now living near Hillsboro, and following farming. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and a man beloved by all who know him. He was well off when the [Civil] war broke out, but suffered heavy losses during those troublous times. He served a short time in the Confederate army. His wife, Elizabeth Douglas, was born in Tennessee and died there, the mother of eleven children.

(3) A household headed by Claburn STARNES is listed in the 1840 census of Coffee County, TN. [The compiler believes that Claburn was Charles Claiborne STARNES.]

Listed in Claburn's household are 1 free white male under 5 years of age; 1 free white male between 5 and 10 years of age; 1 free white male between 30 and 40 years of age; 2 free white females under 5 years of age; 1 free white female between 15 and 20 years of age; and 1 free white female between 20 and 30 years of age.

Assuming that Claburn is the free white male listed in the 1840 census as then being between 30 and 40 years of age, he would have been born sometime between 1800 and 1810, according to the 1840 census.

Assuming that Claburn's wife is the free white female listed in the 1840 census as then being between 20 and 30 years of age in 1840, she would have been born between 1810 and 1820, according to the 1840 census. According to Starnes, H. Gerald & Starnes, Herman, Of Them That Left a Name Behind - A History of the Starnes Family, Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1983, p. 694, this person was Elizabeth STARNES.

The free white female who is listed in the 1840 census as then being between 15 and 20 years of age might have then been too old to have been a daughter of Claburn and/or his wife. According to Starnes, H. Gerald & Starnes, Herman, Of Them That Left a Name Behind - A History of the Starnes Family, Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1983, p. 694, this female was Martha Ann STARNES.

Assuming that the other persons in Claburn's household are children of Claburn and/or his wife, those children would have consisted of 2 sons (1 of which sons would have been born between 1835 and 1840, and 1 of which sons would have been born between 1830 and 1835, according to the 1840 census) and 2 daughters (which daughters would have been born between 1835 and 1840, according to the 1840 census).

According to Starnes, H. Gerald & Starnes, Herman, Of Them That Left a Name Behind - A History of the Starnes Family, Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1983, p. 694, the son who was born between 1835 and 1840 was James STARNES.

According to Starnes, H. Gerald & Starnes, Herman, Of Them That Left a Name Behind - A History of the Starnes Family, Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1983, p. 694, the son who was born between 1830 and 1825 was Thomas STARNES.

According to Starnes, H. Gerald & Starnes, Herman, Of Them That Left a Name Behind - A History of the Starnes Family, Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1983, p. 694, the 2 daughters who were born between 1835 and 1840 were Edith and Mary STARNES.

(4) A household headed by C. C. STARNES is listed in the 1850 census of the First District of Coffee County, TN. According to Starnes, H. Gerald & Starnes, Herman, Of Them That Left a Name Behind - A History of the Starnes Family, Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1983, p. 694, this person was Claborn C. STARNES. [The compiler believes that C. C. was Charles Claiborne STARNES.]

C. C. is listed in the 1850 census as a farmer who was then 39 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1811. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Listed with C. C. is his wife, Elizabeth, who was then 36 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1814. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his son, Thomas, a farmer who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1835. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his daughter, Edith, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his daughter, Mary, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1838. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his son, James, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1840. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his daughter, Susan, who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1844. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his daughter, Sarah, who was then 4 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1846. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his son, Claborn, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1848. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN. [The compiler believes that Claborn was Claiborne Jefferson STARNES.]

Also listed with C. C. is Martha Ann STARNES, who was then 24 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1826. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN. [The compiler believes that Martha Ann may have then been too old to have been C. C.'s daughter; and this belief is strengthened by the fact that Martha Ann is listed out of the regular age order of C. C.'s children in the 1850 census.]

(5) A household headed by C. C. STARNES is listed in the 1860 census of Cannon County, TN, next to a household headed by his son-in-law, W. R. WHITTEMORE. [The compiler believes that C. C. STARNES, whose surname is listed as STARNER in the index to the 1860 census, was Charles Claiborne STARNES.]

C. C. is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1811. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Listed with C. C. is his wife, Elizabeth, who was then 40 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1820. According to the 1860 census, she was born in VA.

Also listed with C. C. is his daughter, Susan, who was then 16 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1844. According to the 1860 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his daughter, Sarah, who was then 14 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1846. According to the 1860 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his son, Jefferson, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1848. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN. [The compiler believes that Jefferson was Claiborne Jefferson STARNES.]

Also listed with C. C. is his son, William, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1850. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with C. C. is his son, John, who was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1853. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

[Note by compiler: C. C.'s children, Thomas, Edith, Mary and James, as well as Martha Ann STARNES, all of whom are listed in C. C.'s household in the 1850 census, are not listed in C. C.'s household in the 1860 census.]

(6) A household headed by Charles STARNES is listed in the 1870 census of the 7th District of Coffee County, TN, next to a household headed by his daughter, Margaret WHITEMORE. [The compiler believes that Charles was Charles Claiborne STARNES.]

Charles is listed in the 1870 census as a farmer who was then 60 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1810. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

Listed with Charles is his wife, Elisabeth, who was then 50 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1820. According to the 1870 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with Charles is his son, Jeferson, who was then 20 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1850. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN. [The compiler believes that Jeferson was Claiborne Jefferson STARNES.]

Also listed with Charles is his son, William, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1853. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Charles is his son, John, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1855. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

(7) A household headed by Claiborne STARNS is listed in the 1880 census of Hillsboro, 7th District, Coffee County, TN. [The compiler believes that Claiborne was Charles Claiborne STARNES.]

Claiborne is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer who was then 69 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1811. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN. The places of birth of his parents are not listed in the 1880 census.

Listed with Claiborne is his wife, Mary, who was then 44 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1856. According to the 1880 census, she was born in TN, and her mother was also born in TN. The place of birth of her father is not listed in the 1880 census.

Also listed with Claiborne is his grandson, Newton Whittamore, who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1862. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were also born in TN.

Also listed with Claiborne is his granddaughter, Mary B. Whittamore, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1867. According to the 1880 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were also born in TN.

(8) C. C. STARNES is listed in an 1891 list of male voters in the 7th District, Coffee County, TN.

(9) Clabourn STEARNS is listed in the household of his son, William STEARNS, in the 1900 census of Precinct 2, Kaufman County, TX. [The compiler believes that Clabourn, whose first name is listed as Claleourn in the index to the 1900 census, was Charles Claiborne STARNES.]

Clabourn is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer who was born in June 1810 and was then 89 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in SC. The places of birth of his parents are listed in the 1900 census as being unknown. According to the 1900 census, he was then a widower.

(10) www.findagrave.com:

Charles "C." Claiborne "C." Starnes
Birth: Jun. 22, 1810, Tennessee, USA
Death: 1900, Kaufman County, Texas, USA

Charles Claiborne (called C. C.) Starnes is the son of Peter Starnes Sr. & Barbara Jane _____. He lived in Coffee County, Tennessee, but I do not know if he was born there.

He is the grandfather of Mary Belle Cavis who is also buried here. (She has stone that gives her last name as Covis.)

I would like an update for his full death date as all I have is the year.

C. C. was well off before serving a short time in the Civil War. He suffered heavy losses during those times. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Burial: Hillcrest Cemetery, Forney, Kaufman County, Texas, USA

Created by: Cindy Elschide
Record added: Sep 08, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 41715177 
STARNES, Charles Claiborne (I114)
 
25250 (1) The compiler's family has an old KIRKENDALL family Bible.

The KIRKENDALL information in the Bible relates to the family of Moses KIRKENDALL, Sr., who was born on 5 January 1798 in Mifflin Township, Allegheny County, PA, and died in 1853 in Appanoose County, IA.

Moses KIRKENDALL, Sr. had a sister, Margaret (KIRKENDALL) (BURK/BURKE) BARKES.

Margaret (KIRKENDALL) (BURK/BURKE) BARKES was the mother of Bethsheba (BARKES) FROST.

Bethsheba (BARKES) FROST was the first wife of the compiler's great-grandfather, James Ross FROST.

When Moses KIRKENDALL, Sr. died in Appanoose County, IA in about 1853, his family Bible came into the possession of his sister, Margaret (KIRKENDALL) (BURK/BURKE) BARKES, and through her and her daughter, Bethsheba (BARKES) FROST, the Bible came into the possession of the FROST family.

Following are some of the entries in the Bible:

Moses KIRKENDALL Sen, b. 01/05/1798
Christeny KIRKENDALL, b. 01/27/1794
Phebe M. KIRKENDALL, b. 05/02/1819
Margaret KIRKENDALL, b 07/11/1820
Daniel KIRKENDALL, b. 10/14/1821
Katharine KIRKENDALL, b. 05/02/1823

Ann KIRKENDALL, b. 07/11/1801
Evan L. KIRKENDALL, b. 08/08/1826
Rebecca Ann KIRKENDALL, b. 01/27/1828
Samuel KIRKENDALL, b. 08/29/1829
Sarah Ellen KIRKENDALL, b. 08/07/1834

Katharine KIRKENDALL, b. 07/16
James A. KIRKENDALL, b. 06/23
Nathaniel KIRKENDALL, b. 03/10
Moses KIRKENDALL, b. 09/27
Louisa Jane KIRKENDALL, b. 06/15

There are some other names in the Bible that are hard to read. One is Sarah LANE. The compiler doesn't know who Sarah was. There are several names below hers that the compiler can't read. Then there is a Mary Eleanor B___, who was born on January 30, 1841. The compiler believes that Mary Eleanor B___ was Mary Eleanor BARKES, a daughter of William BARKES and his wife, Margaret (KIRKENDALL) (BURK/BURKE) BARKES. [Mary Eleanor BARKES was a sister of Bethsheba (BARKES) FROST.

On another page of the Bible, there are names of persons who are apparently Biblical characters (Adam, Seth and Methuselah).

The Bible in question is in very poor condition. The front and back covers are off the Bible, and the front and back pages are powdery. The pages of the Bible are approximately ledger size. The compiler has found one page of the Bible that appears to indicate that the Bible was printed in the 1880's. Also, the compiler has found another page that has recorded on it the names and dates of birth of children of the compiler's great-grandfather, James Ross FROST, and James' first and second wives, Bethsheba (BARKES) FROST and Ellen (VROMAN) FROST.

Unfortunately, the information in the Bible is incomplete. No places of birth, and no marriages, are mentioned in the Bible.

The KIRKENDALL information is written in ink, and the FROST information is written in pencil. If the Bible was printed in the 1880's, the information about the KIRKENDALLs was obviously entered after the fact.

The Bible lists three wives of Moses KIRKENDALL, Sr. - Christeny, Ann and Katharine. The other KIRKENDALLs listed in the Bible are Moses' children by these three wives.

(2) Kuykendall, George Benson, History of the Kuykendall Family, Portland, OR: Kilham Stationery & Printing Co., 1919, pp. 275-276:

The following communication from James Allen Kirkendall, of Camas Valley, Douglas county, Oregon, shows how families wander from the land of their nativity and settle down in some little out of the way nook, and lose trace of their forefathers. He wrote:

"I cannot give you much information in regard to my father's family. My grandfather died when my father was 14 years of age, and I have never seen any of my uncles or aunts, so all I can tell you is what I have heard my father say. My grandfather's name was Samuel, my father's name was Moses. He had three brothers, Ira, James, and Allen. My father was born near Pittsburg [sic], Pa. My grandfather moved to Ohio, near Cincinnati, and from there to McClain county, Illinois; from there to Grundy county, Missouri, and from there to Appanoosa [sic; should be Appanoose] county, Iowa, where he died in the year 1853, aged 53 years.

"My father had seven sons, four of whom were older than myself and two younger. I am the only one of my father's family living, and I will be 73 years old next June. My wife is still living and is 64 years old. We have four sons and one daughter living. We have twelve grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Four of the grandchildren are Kirkendalls. This is about all I can tell you about my father's family."

Mr. Kirkendall died May 20, 1916, and a notice of his death appeared in one of the Oregon state papers, reading as follows:

"JAMES ALLEN KIRKENDALL, PIONEER OF 1859, DIES AT CAMAS VALLEY."

"Another Oregon pioneer passed away May 9. James Allen Kirkendall was born in Grundy County, Missouri, June 23, 1839, where he lived until he was 20. Seized with the wanderlust prevalent in that day, he crossed the plains to California in 1859. There he enlisted as a volunteer in the Pitt River Indian War. In 1862 he was at the Florence City mines, from whence he went to Walla Walla, Wash.

"The next year he married Miss Missouri Belieu. The Kirkendalls removed to Camas Valley in 1865, which has since been their home.

"Mr. Kirkendall was the father of 16 children, 11 of whom are living. He had 65 grandchildren, 46 of whom are living, and 11 great grandchildren, nine of whom are living."

In the letter of Mrs. P. B. Kirkendall, of Shavertown, later quoted, she says her sister-in-law, Mrs. Shaver, is the oldest Kirkendall she knows of; that Mrs. Shaver's father, Samuel Kirkendall, came from New Jersey and settled in Carverton; Isaac Kirkendall was his oldest son, and Isaac's daughter married William Berlew. In the letter of J. A. Kirkendall, of Camas Valley, Oregon, quoted above, he says his grandfather's name was Samuel, and his father's name was Moses. His father was born near Pittsburg, Pa. The writer of the letter, James Allen Kirkendall, married a Miss Missouri Belieu. Here we have families in Pennsylvania and in Southern Oregon in which the same given names are common and in which we find intermarriages with the Belieus. If these clues were followed out, there would most surely be very interesting facts developed, showing relationships that would help to clear up difficulties that cling to these branches.

(3) A household headed by Moses KERKENDALL is listed in the 1820 census of Wayne Township, Adams County, OH.

Listed in Moses' household are 1 free white male between 16 and 26 years of age; 2 free white females under 10 years of age; and 1 free white female between 16 and 26 years of age.

Since only one male is listed in Moses' household in the 1820 census, Moses must be the free white male listed in the 1820 census as then being between 16 and 26 years of age. He would have been born between 1794 and 1804, according to the 1820 census.

Assuming that Moses' wife is the free white female listed in the 1820 census as then being between 16 and 26 years of age, she would have been born between 1794 and 1804, according to the 1820 census.

Assuming that the rest of the persons in Moses' household are children of Moses or his wife, those children would have consisted of two daughters (both of which daughters would have been born between 1810 and 1820, according to the 1820 census).

(4) A household headed by Moses KIRKENDALL is listed in the 1830 census of Union Township, Ralls County, MO.

Listed in Moses' household is 1 free white male between 20 and 30 years of age.

Since only one person is listed in Moses' household in the 1830 census, Moses must be the free white male listed in the 1830 census as then being between 20 and 30 years of age. He would have been born between 1800 and 1810, according to the 1830 census.

(5) A household headed by Moses KIRKENDALL is listed in the 1840 census of Jackson Township, Livingston County, MO.

Listed in Moses' household are 1 free white male under 5 years of age; 3 free white males between 5 and 10 years of age; 1 free white male between 10 and 15 years of age; 1 free white male between 15 and 20 years of age; 1 free white male between 40 and 50 years of age; 1 free white female between 5 and 10 years of age; 2 free white females between 10 and 15 years of age; and 1 free white female between 30 and 40 years of age.

Assuming that Moses is the free white male listed in the 1840 census as then being between 40 and 50 years of age, he would have been born between 1790 and 1800, according to the 1840 census.

Assuming tha Moses' wife is the free white female listed in the 1840 census as then being between 30 and 40 years of age, she would have been born between 1800 and 1810, according to the 1840 census.

Assuming that the rest of the persons in Moses' household are children of Moses or his wife, those children would have consisted of six sons (one of which sons would have been born between 1820 and 1825, one of which sons would have been born between 1825 and 1830, three of which sons would have been born between 1830 and 1835, and one of which sons would have been born between 1835 and 1840, according to the 1840 census) and three daughters (two of which daughers would have been born between 1825 and 1830, and one of which daughters would have been born between 1830 and 1835, according to the 1840 census).

Living near Moses at the time of the 1840 census was a household headed by Jacob THRAILKILL.

(6) Bureau of Land Management - General Land Office Records :

Patent Description
Names
Patentee: MOSES KIRKENDALL
Survey
State: MISSOURI
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Title Transfer
Issue Date: 5/1/1843
Land Office: Lexington
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 16597
Accession/Serial Nr.: MO1370__.323
BLM Serial Nr.: MO NO S/N
Legal Land Description
Aliquot Parts
SE
Sec./Block
27/
Township
62-N
Range
24-W
Fract. Section
No
Meridian
5th PM
State
MO
Counties
Grundy
Survey Nr.

* * *

Patent Description
Names
Patentee: MOSES KIRKENDALL
Survey
State: MISSOURI
Acres: 160
Metes/Bounds: No
Title Transfer
Issue Date: 5/1/1843
Land Office: Lexington
Cancelled: No
U.S. Reservations: No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
Document Numbers
Document Nr.: 16995
Accession/Serial Nr.: MO1380__.198
BLM Serial Nr.: MO NO S/N
Legal Land Description
Aliquot Parts
SW
Sec./Block
26/
Township
62-N
Range
24-W
Fract. Section
No
Meridian
5th PM
State
MO
Counties
Grundy
Survey Nr.

(7) A household headed by Moses KIRKENDALL is listed in the 1850 census of Shoal Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses is listed in the 1850 census as a farmer who was then 51 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1799. According to the 1850 census, he was born in PA.

Listed with Moses is his son, Daniel, a farmer who was then 28 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1822. According to the 1850 census, he was born in OH.

Also listed with Moses is his son, James, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1838. According to the 1850 census, he was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his son, Nathan, who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1841. According to the 1850 census, he was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his son, Moses, who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1842. According to the 1850 census, he was born in MO.

(8) Iowa Census, 1838-70 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1999-:

Name: MOSES KIRKENDALL
State: IA
County: Appanoose County
Township: No Township Listed
Year: 1852
Page: 011
Database: IA 1852 State Census Index
 
KIRKENDALL, Moses Sr. (I2568)
 

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