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25201 (1) The New York Times, July 30, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

Army of Children Claim Villa's Estate; 7,000,000 Pesos in Buried Treasure Sought
-
MEXICO CITY, July 29 (Associated Press.) - The fight of his numerous widows and children for the estate of Francisco Villa, slain bandit chieftain, promises to become as exciting as the search for the 7,000,000 pesos which "Pancho" is popularly reported to have buried in the vicinity of Parral.

Reports from Chihuahua state that Villa had a presentiment of death several weeks before his assassination, and wrote to several of his wives, promising them shares of his estate. Thus far five wives and a small army of children have filed claims, in addition to his brother Hipolito and his sister Mariana.

The wives who have filed claims are as follows:

Esther Cardona of Chihuahua, who has two children; Paula Alamillo of Torreon, no children; Soledad R. De Villa of Canutillo, one son; Petra Espinosa of Santa Barbara, one son; and Austreberta Renteria, Canutillo, one son.

Claims also have been filed by:

A daughter, Maria, of Canutillo, mother unknown; a son by Juana Torres, who died recently in Los Angeles; a son by the late Guadalupe Coss, whose father Villa slew; a son by the late Asuncion R. De Villa, Canutillo.

More than a dozen other children in Parral and Canutillo claim the bandit chieftain as their father, alleging that their mothers were kidnapped by him and never reappeared.

Reports of the buried treasure are believed by the authorities to be without foundation.

(2) The New York Times, March 27, 1930, Copyright © The New York Times:

CHIHUAHUA, Mexico, March 26 (Associated Press) - Señora Luz Corral de Villa is the rightful widow and heiress of the famous outlaw leader Pancho Villa, a court here has held. The court awarded the former bandit chief's estate to her against the claims of Señora Austreberta Renteria de Villa, who maintained she was Villa's widow. The bandit was reported to have had several wives.

(3) Newport Mercury, Newport, RI, September 15, 1923, p. 6:

WIVES OF VILLA TELL ROMANCES
-
Women in Various Parts of Mexico to Claim Estate Worth Millions.
-
Torreon, Mexico. - Just how many wives did Francisco Villa have?

The question, for years a subject for speculation as one Mrs. Villa after another was heard of, suddenly ceased to be academic when the former bandit leader was killed on his ranch in Durango recently.

From an outlaw with no estate save the price on his head, Villa had become a large landholder, and his legal wife and children presumably can claim a large inheritance.

Several alleged wives have already emerged from obscurity, and inquiries In Chihuahua, Durango and along the Mexican border indicate that several more will probably will do so. He is generally credited there with ten of them.

Separated on Nuptial Day.

A few days after the bandit chief's death a correspondent visited Mrs. Luz Corral Villa at Chihuahua City. Mrs. Luz Villa is of a type rare among Mexicans, a blue-eyed, golden-haired, magnificently built woman, with poise and personality. She is about thirty-six years old, and well educated. After her marriage she added to her education the accomplishments of painting and the piano.

She was married to "General" Villa, as she always calls him, in 1908, in the Catholic church at San Andres, Mexico, she told the correspondent. They then went to Chihuahua to be married by the court, but before the ceremony could be performed Villa was captured and taken to Mexico City. Upon his return to Chihuahua several months later they were married by the court.

Villa built a beautiful quinta for her on Tenth street in Chihuahua, of which the furnishings alone cost 60,000 pesos or more, she said, and lavished gorgeous jewelry and luxuries upon her. She claims he always spoke of her to his friends as his "only love."

In 1910, during the trouble over the shooting of Americans, Villa sent Dona Luz to the United States for safety, where she remained until 1920.

Villa and Dona Luz had no children, she says, but during most of the time she was in the United States she took care of and educated three of his children, whose mothers were unknown to her.

In 1920 she returned to Mexico, and lived with Villa at Canutillo, his immense ranch. A few days after she arrived there, she declares, Villa brought another wife, Esther Cradone [sic; should be Cardona], into the house.

Sent Mistress to Another Town.

Nominally however, the large fair Dona Luz triumphed. She told Villa she would leave him if he did not send Esther away, and he yielded. But he sent her only as far as Chihuahua.

The correspondent saw her there a few days ago, at Avenue Penitenciaria, No. 817. "Every time Villa came to Chihuahua he visited me," she declared: "and every time I received money from him."

With Esther gone, peace returned to the ranch at Canutillo: but not for long. One day a letter came addressed to Villa in a woman's hand. It read: The lawyer that you sent was here to see my father, but my father is against our marriage because he believes you are already married. If you can prove the contrary, speak with my uncle, who lives in Parrel [sic; should be Parral]." It was signed, "Austaberta [sic; should be Austreberta] Renteria."

Dona Luz knew the girl, she says. Austaberta [sic] had once told her that Villa had tortured her father by burning his feet off. Villa never got that letter, Dona Luz admits frankly.

New Favorite Ousts Wife.

But neither her influence nor suppression of the letter which had come into her hands could keep Villa from acquiring the new wife on whom he had his eyes. However he managed it, he presently brought Austaberta [sic] to Canutillo. Dona Luz protested in vain; they quarreled; he told her to leave, and she left penniless, according to her story.

Villa, it is said, had a son by Austaberta [sic], who is still Iiving with his mother at Canutillo. She is believed to be the last wife with whom Villa lived.

Both Esther and Dona Luz say their husband was always good to them in his way, never unkind, and that he always provided well for them. They say, too, that his main thought was the education of his children.

Still another wife was found at Torreon, Coahuila. She is Paula Alamillo de Villa, young still, dark and slender, with magnificent eyes.

She married Villa in 1914, when she was only fourteen years old. Her little girl, Evangeline, is now eight years old. She told a simple and straightforward story.

Dreaded by Girl's Parents.

"When Pancho Villa took possession of Torreon with his rebel horde," she said, "he saw me, in spite of the fact that wherever he went, all girls were immediately hidden from sight on account of the extreme dread with which all parents beheld him. Shortly afterward he secured my address. Although at that time I was only fourteen years old, Villa came to see my father and asked him for my hand in formal marriage, as is customary in this country, and offered my father $30,000, United States money, to assure his future from want.

"In spite of this offer my father, knowing Villa's reputation, did not hesitate to turn the offer down. Villa's answer was that be always got what he wanted, and since he had the power necessary in this case, he would take me by force. This threat was immediately carried out, and Villa, with pistol in hand, forcibly married me. Just before the ceremony, probably as a sort of bribe to make me more friendly toward him, he gave me $5,000 American money to buy suitable clothes with.

Says Villa Was Generous.

"As long as Villa stayed in Torreon and lived with me, which was about a year, he treated me with every consideration, and gave me 500 pesos a month for expenses. It was toward the end of this year that our little daughter was born. Villa showed great love for her, and named her Evangeline.

"The end of our short romance came when the federal troops drove Villa to the mountains in 1915, and I and my baby were left in Torreon with no means of support. I had to go to work as a seamstress, although I had never done such work before.

"In 1921, when Villa surrendered to General Martinez, I hurried to Tiahualilo to see him, and he gave me some money and assured me my troubles were all over. He promised he would send some one to Torreon to arrange for a residence for me, but this promise was never kept.

Expects to Be Left Out.

"In spite of all that has happened I must say that throughout our relationship Villa was always very kind to me and seemed to want me to love him, or at least return in part his own love for me.

"At present I do not know what arrangements he has made for me and the little girl, but I do not think we will get anything from his very rich estate."

The story of Juana Torres de Villa has been told in several ways. She was a beautiful girl of pure Spanish stock, educated in the North. Her family became impoverished and she took a position in a store at Torreon, where Villa saw her in 1913. He seized her. She told him she would kill herself unless he married her, and he willingly went through the ceremony. According to most of the stories, she grew to love her captor. A baby girl was born, and Villa sent mother and child to Los Angeles.

Death Reported in Los Angeles.

It was reported in 1917 that she had gone to Chihuahua in the hope of rejoining him, and had been captured by the Carranzistas when they took the city, sent to Mexico City, and there shot by Villa's enemies.

Later reports, however, told of her death in Los Angeles. The child has lived at the Canutillo ranch since then.

Four other children of Villa are said to be known, with their mothers, all of whom are living in Canutillo. Several more women who have lived with Villa at various times now live in El Paso, and have signified their intention of asking for a share of the estate. - New York World.

(4) Katz, Friedrich, The Life and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, © 1998 by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 908, footnote 102:

The legality of Luz Corral's marriage to Villa was twice challenged in and twice upheld by the courts. In 1925, Austreberta [Renteria] challenged the validity of Luz Corral's marriage to Villa, stating that since the marriage certificate between Luz Corral and Villa was dated Dec. 16, 1915, it was invalid, because Chihuahua had then still been under Conventionist administration and the subsequent Carrancista administration had declared all the decisions of the Conventionist government to be illegal. Apart from the fact that neither the Carranza administration nor its successors ever revoked marriage licenses or other civil measures taken during the Conventionist period, it was at the very least very strange for the widow of Pancho Villa to base her claims on the theory that her husband's administration of Chihuahua had been illegal. . . .

The more serious challenge to the legality of Luz Corral's marriage to Villa was submitted to the Mexican courts nine years later in 1934 by a lawyer representing Villa's daughter by Juana Torres. The accusation stated that the marriage license between Villa and Luz Corral was dated Dec. 16, 1915, but that Villa had married Juana Torres on Oct. 7, 1913, and since the latter died only in 1916, Villa had committed bigamy by marrying Luz Corral while his legal wife was still alive, and that his marriage to Luz Corral was thus invalid. The lawyer demanded that Juana Torres's daughter be declared Villa's sole heir. Somewhat strangely, this petition was supported by another widow of Villa's, Soledad Sea??ez, who declared that since Luz Corral's marriage to Villa was invalid and Juana Torres had died in 1916, her [Soldedad Sea??ez's] marriage to Villa, which had taken place on May 1, 1919, established her as Villa's sole legal widow. She was nevertheless ready to recognize Juana Torres's daughter as the only legal heir to Villa's properties.

Luz Corral rejected these claims by stating that she had married Villa in 1911, but that the original marriage license had been lost, and the certificate of 1915 did not constitute a new marriage license but simply a ratification of a wedding that had already taken place in 1911. This was in fact stated in the marriage license of 1915, and the judge decided in favor of Luz Corral. 
RENTARÍA, Austreberta (I19271)
 
25202 (1) The New York Times, July 30, 1923, Copyright © The New York Times:

Army of Children Claim Villa's Estate; 7,000,000 Pesos in Buried Treasure Sought
-
MEXICO CITY, July 29 (Associated Press.) - The fight of his numerous widows and children for the estate of Francisco Villa, slain bandit chieftain, promises to become as exciting as the search for the 7,000,000 pesos which "Pancho" is popularly reported to have buried in the vicinity of Parral.

Reports from Chihuahua state that Villa had a presentiment of death several weeks before his assassination, and wrote to several of his wives, promising them shares of his estate. Thus far five wives and a small army of children have filed claims, in addition to his brother Hipolito and his sister Mariana.

The wives who have filed claims are as follows:

Esther Cardona of Chihuahua, who has two children; Paula Alamillo of Torreon, no children; Soledad R. De Villa of Canutillo, one son; Petra Espinosa of Santa Barbara, one son; and Austreberta Renteria, Canutillo, one son.

Claims also have been filed by:

A daughter, Maria, of Canutillo, mother unknown; a son by Juana Torres, who died recently in Los Angeles; a son by the late Guadalupe Coss, whose father Villa slew; a son by the late Asuncion R. De Villa, Canutillo.

More than a dozen other children in Parral and Canutillo claim the bandit chieftain as their father, alleging that their mothers were kidnapped by him and never reappeared.

Reports of the buried treasure are believed by the authorities to be without foundation.

(2) Newport Mercury, Newport, RI, September 15, 1923, p. 6:

WIVES OF VILLA TELL ROMANCES
-
Women in Various Parts of Mexico to Claim Estate Worth Millions.
-
Torreon, Mexico. - Just how many wives did Francisco Villa have?

The question, for years a subject for speculation as one Mrs. Villa after another was heard of, suddenly ceased to be academic when the former bandit leader was killed on his ranch in Durango recently.

From an outlaw with no estate save the price on his head, Villa had become a large landholder, and his legal wife and children presumably can claim a large inheritance.

Several alleged wives have already emerged from obscurity, and inquiries In Chihuahua, Durango and along the Mexican border indicate that several more will probably will do so. He is generally credited there with ten of them.

Separated on Nuptial Day.

A few days after the bandit chief's death a correspondent visited Mrs. Luz Corral Villa at Chihuahua City. Mrs. Luz Villa is of a type rare among Mexicans, a blue-eyed, golden-haired, magnificently built woman, with poise and personality. She is about thirty-six years old, and well educated. After her marriage she added to her education the accomplishments of painting and the piano.

She was married to "General" Villa, as she always calls him, in 1908, in the Catholic church at San Andres, Mexico, she told the correspondent. They then went to Chihuahua to be married by the court, but before the ceremony could be performed Villa was captured and taken to Mexico City. Upon his return to Chihuahua several months later they were married by the court.

Villa built a beautiful quinta for her on Tenth street in Chihuahua, of which the furnishings alone cost 60,000 pesos or more, she said, and lavished gorgeous jewelry and luxuries upon her. She claims he always spoke of her to his friends as his "only love."

In 1910, during the trouble over the shooting of Americans, Villa sent Dona Luz to the United States for safety, where she remained until 1920.

Villa and Dona Luz had no children, she says, but during most of the time she was in the United States she took care of and educated three of his children, whose mothers were unknown to her.

In 1920 she returned to Mexico, and lived with Villa at Canutillo, his immense ranch. A few days after she arrived there, she declares, Villa brought another wife, Esther Cradone [sic; should be Cardona], into the house.

Sent Mistress to Another Town.

Nominally however, the large fair Dona Luz triumphed. She told Villa she would leave him if he did not send Esther away, and he yielded. But he sent her only as far as Chihuahua.

The correspondent saw her there a few days ago, at Avenue Penitenciaria, No. 817. "Every time Villa came to Chihuahua he visited me," she declared: "and every time I received money from him."

With Esther gone, peace returned to the ranch at Canutillo: but not for long. One day a letter came addressed to Villa in a woman's hand. It read: The lawyer that you sent was here to see my father, but my father is against our marriage because he believes you are already married. If you can prove the contrary, speak with my uncle, who lives in Parrel [sic; should be Parral]." It was signed, "Austaberta [sic; should be Austreberta] Renteria."

Dona Luz knew the girl, she says. Austaberta [sic] had once told her that Villa had tortured her father by burning his feet off. Villa never got that letter, Dona Luz admits frankly.

New Favorite Ousts Wife.

But neither her influence nor suppression of the letter which had come into her hands could keep Villa from acquiring the new wife on whom he had his eyes. However he managed it, he presently brought Austaberta [sic] to Canutillo. Dona Luz protested in vain; they quarreled; he told her to leave, and she left penniless, according to her story.

Villa, it is said, had a son by Austaberta [sic], who is still Iiving with his mother at Canutillo. She is believed to be the last wife with whom Villa lived.

Both Esther and Dona Luz say their husband was always good to them in his way, never unkind, and that he always provided well for them. They say, too, that his main thought was the education of his children.

Still another wife was found at Torreon, Coahuila. She is Paula Alamillo de Villa, young still, dark and slender, with magnificent eyes.

She married Villa in 1914, when she was only fourteen years old. Her little girl, Evangeline, is now eight years old. She told a simple and straightforward story.

Dreaded by Girl's Parents.

"When Pancho Villa took possession of Torreon with his rebel horde," she said, "he saw me, in spite of the fact that wherever he went, all girls were immediately hidden from sight on account of the extreme dread with which all parents beheld him. Shortly afterward he secured my address. Although at that time I was only fourteen years old, Villa came to see my father and asked him for my hand in formal marriage, as is customary in this country, and offered my father $30,000, United States money, to assure his future from want.

"In spite of this offer my father, knowing Villa's reputation, did not hesitate to turn the offer down. Villa's answer was that be always got what he wanted, and since he had the power necessary in this case, he would take me by force. This threat was immediately carried out, and Villa, with pistol in hand, forcibly married me. Just before the ceremony, probably as a sort of bribe to make me more friendly toward him, he gave me $5,000 American money to buy suitable clothes with.

Says Villa Was Generous.

"As long as Villa stayed in Torreon and lived with me, which was about a year, he treated me with every consideration, and gave me 500 pesos a month for expenses. It was toward the end of this year that our little daughter was born. Villa showed great love for her, and named her Evangeline.

"The end of our short romance came when the federal troops drove Villa to the mountains in 1915, and I and my baby were left in Torreon with no means of support. I had to go to work as a seamstress, although I had never done such work before.

"In 1921, when Villa surrendered to General Martinez, I hurried to Tiahualilo to see him, and he gave me some money and assured me my troubles were all over. He promised he would send some one to Torreon to arrange for a residence for me, but this promise was never kept.

Expects to Be Left Out.

"In spite of all that has happened I must say that throughout our relationship Villa was always very kind to me and seemed to want me to love him, or at least return in part his own love for me.

"At present I do not know what arrangements he has made for me and the little girl, but I do not think we will get anything from his very rich estate."

The story of Juana Torres de Villa has been told in several ways. She was a beautiful girl of pure Spanish stock, educated in the North. Her family became impoverished and she took a position in a store at Torreon, where Villa saw her in 1913. He seized her. She told him she would kill herself unless he married her, and he willingly went through the ceremony. According to most of the stories, she grew to love her captor. A baby girl was born, and Villa sent mother and child to Los Angeles.

Death Reported in Los Angeles.

It was reported in 1917 that she had gone to Chihuahua in the hope of rejoining him, and had been captured by the Carranzistas when they took the city, sent to Mexico City, and there shot by Villa's enemies.

Later reports, however, told of her death in Los Angeles. The child has lived at the Canutillo ranch since then.

Four other children of Villa are said to be known, with their mothers, all of whom are living in Canutillo. Several more women who have lived with Villa at various times now live in El Paso, and have signified their intention of asking for a share of the estate. - New York World.

(3) Katz, Friedrich, The Life and Times of Pancho Villa, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998, © 1998 by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, p. 908, footnote 102:

The legality of Luz Corral's marriage to Villa was twice challenged in and twice upheld by the courts. In 1925, Austreberta [Renteria] challenged the validity of Luz Corral's marriage to Villa, stating that since the marriage certificate between Luz Corral and Villa was dated Dec. 16, 1915, it was invalid, because Chihuahua had then still been under Conventionist administration and the subsequent Carrancista administration had declared all the decisions of the Conventionist government to be illegal. Apart from the fact that neither the Carranza administration nor its successors ever revoked marriage licenses or other civil measures taken during the Conventionist period, it was at the very least very strange for the widow of Pancho Villa to base her claims on the theory that her husband's administration of Chihuahua had been illegal. . . .

The more serious challenge to the legality of Luz Corral's marriage to Villa was submitted to the Mexican courts nine years later in 1934 by a lawyer representing Villa's daughter by Juana Torres. The accusation stated that the marriage license between Villa and Luz Corral was dated Dec. 16, 1915, but that Villa had married Juana Torres on Oct. 7, 1913, and since the latter died only in 1916, Villa had committed bigamy by marrying Luz Corral while his legal wife was still alive, and that his marriage to Luz Corral was thus invalid. The lawyer demanded that Juana Torres's daughter be declared Villa's sole heir. Somewhat strangely, this petition was supported by another widow of Villa's, Soledad Seañez, who declared that since Luz Corral's marriage to Villa was invalid and Juana Torres had died in 1916, her [Soldedad Seañez's] marriage to Villa, which had taken place on May 1, 1919, established her as Villa's sole legal widow. She was nevertheless ready to recognize Juana Torres's daughter as the only legal heir to Villa's properties.

Luz Corral rejected these claims by stating that she had married Villa in 1911, but that the original marriage license had been lost, and the certificate of 1915 did not constitute a new marriage license but simply a ratification of a wedding that had already taken place in 1911. This was in fact stated in the marriage license of 1915, and the judge decided in favor of Luz Corral. 
TORRES, Juana (I19273)
 
25203 (1) The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, OK, January 3, 1934, p. 11:

CLEANER GIVEN BOARD'S EDICT

Norman Man Says He Will Continue With Prices.

Charge of violating the NRA price code will be lanched against Lawrence Starns, manager and owner of the Varsity Cleaners, Norman, Wednesday [January 3, 1934] if he refuses to raise his price to the code level, Jack Hicks, state administrator of the cleansers' code, said Tuesday night [January 2, 1934].

Starns, cited to appear before a special committee here Tuesday, failed to show up. He said that he didn't received the committee's notice until 11 a.m. Tuesday and the meeting was at noon. A committee of three, headed by Hicks, visited Starns Tuesday afternoon and informed him that if his prices didn't conform Wednesday morning, the charge would be filed with the price and fair practices code division in Dallas.

Declaring that he would be glad to meet with the committee at any time and give his reasons for his present prices, Starns added that he had no intention of changing his prices at present.

"I'm trying to run my business in the best manner possible and will continue as I'm doing until I'm convinced that other methods are better," he said. Starns charged the regular code price of 65 cents on credit work, but cleans and presses a suit for 50 cents if paid in cash.

(2) The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, OK, May 5, 1947, p. 25:

Altus Man Living in Alaska Helps Kill Giant Bear

ALTUS, May 4 [1934]--(Special)--Lawrence Starns, Altusan now living in Anchorage, Alaska, was a co-partner in the recent killing of a Brownie bear that ranks as one of the largest ever killed in Alaska.

Home to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanton Starns, in Altus, Starns brought an April 12 issue of the Anchorage News back to back up his bear-hunt story.

The News said the big Brownie shot by Starns and Jimmy Sumpter on April 6 is one of the largest ever brought down in Alaska because the wildlife service records verify that fact. The bear, which was estimated to be 30 years old, measured 10 feet, 5 inches from paw to paw, and 9 feet, 6 inches from nose to tail for an average of nearly 10 feet. The largest Brownie recorded in Alaska was taken at Kodiac and measured 11 feet, 8 inches.

Starns and Sumpter, the News related, had guides on the hunt, but actually felled the bear themselves.

(3) The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, OK, December 26, 1953, p. 25:

LAURENCE S. STARNS

ALTUS--Funeral services will be at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Tims chapel in Altus for Laurence S. Starns, former Altusan who died Saturday of a heart attack in Anchorage, Alaska. [Note by compiler: This obituary was printed on December 26, 1953, which was a Saturday. It is difficult to understand from this obituary which Saturday was the date of his death, and which Saturday was the date of his funeral. They probably could not have been the same Saturday, because of the time involved in sending his body from Anchorage, AK, where he died, to Altus, OK, where he was buried.]

Burial will be in Altus.

Born in Altus Oct. 5, 1910, Starns had his early education in Altus, graduating in 1932 from the University of Oklahoma where he was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.

After operating a business in Norman for a few years he moved to Anchorage 12 years ago [in about 1941].

Survivors are his wife and three daughters from Anchorage; his mother, Mrs. Stanton Starns of Altus; two sisters, Mrs. Lowell Austin of Denver and Mrs. Stanley Tilley, 4743 NW 16, Oklahoma City; and a brother, Bill Starns of Altus.

(4) City of Altus Cemetery Burial Database :

Deceased: STARNS, LAWERENCE
Buried:
Addition: 4TH
Section: 1
Space: E
Plot: FULL
Birthdate: 1910
Deathdate: 1953 
STARNS, Laurence Stanton (I2771)
 
25204 (1) The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, OK, May 28, 1971, p. 58:

ALTUS . . .

STARNS, C. W. "Bill", 54, owner and operator of Bill Dunnit Sign Co. Services Friday [May 28, 1971] (Tims).

(2) Social Security Death Index:

Name: Clarence Starns
SSN: 446-12-9581
Born: 7 Apr 1917
Died: May 1971
State (Year) SSN issued: Oklahoma (Before 1951)

(3) City of Altus Cemetery Burial Database :

Deceased: STARNS, CLARENCE
Buried: 05-28-1971
Addition: 4TH
Section: 1
Space: C
Plot: FULL
Birthdate: 1917
Deathdate: 1971 
STARNS, Clarence William (I2919)
 
25205 (1) The Pampa News, Pampa, TX, March 20, 2005:

DATELINE: Pampa, Texas

NAME: Dick L. Hale AGE: 75

DIED: March 18, 2005, in Amarillo, Texas

SERVICES: Memorial services will be announced at a later date. Cremation and arrangements are under the direction of Carmichael-Whatley Funeral Directors.

BIOGRAPHY: Mr. Hale was born September 6, 1929 on a farm near Marshall, Oklahoma. He had been a resident of Pampa since 1974. He retired from Atlantic Richfield in the late 1970's. He was manager for the City of Pampa Recreational Park for a number of years. He attended the Highland Baptist Church and was a 32nd degree Mason.

SURVIVORS: Wife: Joy F. Schulz-Hale of the home. 3 Daughters: Darla J. Terry of Enid, Oklahoma, Tammy S. Meyers of Lubbock, and Teresa J. "Joni" Morris of Shelbyville. 1 Son: Dick L. Hale, Jr., of Enid, Oklahoma. 2 Brothers: Joe Hale of Enid, Oklahoma, and Dick's twin brother Bob Hale, of Sand Springs, Oklahoma. 11 Grandchildren and 6 Great-Grandchildren

(2) The Enid News & Eagle, Enid, OK, March 23, 2005:

DICKEY LAWRENCE HALE

A celebration memorial service for Dick L. Hale, 75, formerly of Covington, will be 2 p.m. Saturday, March 26, at the Covington Christian Church. The Rev. Harold A. Honnold will be officiating. Afterwards a private family burial service will be held at the North I.O.O.F. Cemetery near Marshall, Oklahoma.

Dick was born to Don Ecily and Edna Lee (DeBell) Hale on September 6, 1929 on a farm in Garfield County, Reed Township, five miles northeast of Marshall, Oklahoma and died Friday, March 18, 2005, at Northwest Texas Hospital in Amarillo, Texas.

Dick and his twin brother Bob were the youngest of eleven children. He was raised in the Marshall-Covington area and was a 1947 graduate of Covington High School.

On June 7, 1948, he married Joan McInturff. Dick raised his family of four children in the Covington area. He was a man of service to the Covington community. While in Covington he served on the town board of trustees. He was a volunteer for the fire department and served several terms as mayor. Dick was a member of the Covington Christian Church.

On March 5, 1957, Dick joined the Masonic Lodge in Covington, Oklahoma. He was always proud to have been a Mason for 48 years, having obtained the level of Worshipful Master in 1961. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge 80 in Enid and was a 32nd degree Mason.

Dick worked in the Covington-Garber oilfields for Sinclair Oil Company, which later became Atlantic Richfield in 1969. In 1974, the company transferred Dick and his family to Pampa, Texas, and there he raised his two youngest children.

On December 23, 1979, he married Elna Louine (Kitchens) Edwards. She died on May 19, 1999. Dick retired as the production supervisor for Arco Oil and Gas in the late 1970?s.

Dick was very active in the Pampa community. He ran for Precinct 1, Gray County Commissioner in 1988. In 2003, he became a member of the Moose Lodge #1385.

Dick was the Recreational Park RV Park Attendant for the City of Pampa during the summers from 1994 to 2004. He truly enjoyed meeting people and welcoming them to Pampa. Dick?s children were told by many that visitors to Pampa from other areas and states would make return stops to stay in Pampa just because of his friendliness and quality of devotion in caring for the park.

On May 14, 2004 he married Joy Fay (Williams) Schulz. Together they attended Highland Baptist Church. Although they were married a short time, they were always supportive of each other and enjoyed being together.

Dick loved to hunt and fish. He enjoyed finding a bargain at garage or estate sales. His children remember that Dick was always helping someone and would give away items to others. He was kind, generous and often used the phrase, ?You want it, take it, and get it out of here!?

Survivors include his wife, Joy F. Schulz-Hale, of the home; one son, Dick L. Hale, Jr., of Enid; three daughters: Darla J. Terry of Enid, Tammy S. Meyers of Lubbock, Texas and Teresa J. ?Joni? Morris of Shelbyville, Texas; three step-sons: Barry and Ronald Schulz of Amarillo, Texas and Greg Schulz of Cincinnati, Ohio; mother of his children, Joan Hale of Enid; two brothers, Joe Hale of Enid and Dick?s twin brother, Bob Hale of Sand Springs, Oklahoma.

He was known as grandpa and pepaw to Chandra (Hale) Holly, Jamie (Hale) Davis, Lacie Hale, Dickie Hale III, John Hastings, Dustin Meyers, Jarrod Meyers, Kelsey Meyers, Kortney Meyers, Cari Morris, Brandon Morris and six great-grandchildren: Kara, Hayden, Madison, Elizabeth, Christopher and Jaycee.

He was preceded in death by his parents; four brothers: John, Harry, Don, and Billy; four sisters: Evelyn, Elfa, Vergie, and Lois; second wife, Louine.

Memorials may be made to the Don and Sybil Harrington Cancer Center, 1500 Wallace Blvd., Amarillo, Texas, 79106 or the Dexeus Clinic Relay for Life, 825 East Owen K. Garriott Rd., Enid, Oklahoma, 73701. (Paid Obit 3-23-2)

(3) www.findagrave.com:

Dickey Lawrence Hale
Birth: Sep. 6, 1929
Death: Mar. 18, 2005

Family links: Parents: Don Ecily Hale (1888 - 1965), Edna Lee Debell Hale (1890 - 1985); Spouses: Elna Louine Kitchens Hale (1938 - 1999), Joan Mildred McInturff Hale (1932 - 2015); Siblings: Evelyn Irene Hale Frederick (1910 - 1996), Harry Richard Hale (1912 - 1913), Elfa Hale Lang (1913 - 1996), Vergie Lucille Hale Brown (1916 - 1997), Joseph Cecil Hale (1918 - 2011), Don Marchant Hale (1920 - 1946), Billy Lee Hale (1922 - 2004), Lois Gene Hale Norris (1925 - 2002), Bobby Wayne Hale (1929 - 2014), Bobby Wayne Hale (1929 - 2014), Dickey Lawrence Hale (1929 - 2005)

Inscription:

HALE
DICKEY LAWRENCE
SEPT. 6, 1929
MARCH 18, 2005
BELOVED FATHER

[Back of Stone]

HALE
CHILDREN
DICK L., JR.
DARLA
TAMMY
JONI

Burial: North IOOF Cemetery, Garfield County, Oklahoma, USA

Created by: Darla Terry
Record added: Aug 12, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 20916018 
HALE, Dickey Lawrence (I790)
 
25206 (1) The preferred spelling of this family's surname is shown here as Sarjant, primarily because that is the way Cornelius Sarjant, Sr. spelled his surname on his marriage certificate dated 12 April 1704. However, this surname has been spelled in various ways, including Sargaint, Sargan, Sargant, Sargantt, Sargeant, Sargeante, Sargeaunt, Sargen, Sargent, Sargente, Sargentt, Sargian, Sargiaunt, Sargina, Sargon, Sarguant, Sargyant, Sargyeant, Sarjant, Sarjeant, Sarjent, Sarjiaunt, Seargeaunt, Searjeant, Searjeaunt, Sergante, Sergeant, Sergeante, Sergeaunt, Sergent, Sergiant, Sergint, Seriant, Seriante, Serient, Serjant, Serjante, Serjaunt, Serjeant, Serjeaunt, Serjent, Serjiant, Serjient, Serjint, and Serviens. The most common modern spelling of this surname appears to be Sargent.

(2) Mortimer, Russell, ed., Minute Book of the Men's Meeting of the Society of Friends in Bristol, 1667-1686, Bristol, England: Bristol Record Society, 1971, pp. 214-215:

SARJEANT, Cornelius (d. 1726), soapmaker, soapboiler; of Wine Street, Christchurch p.; son of William Sarjeant, of Bathford; m. (1) Rebecca (sufferer 1683; d. 1702) dau. of William Ball, of Downend, 9 Apr. 1671; 6 s. 5 dau. 1672-86; m. (2) Sarah Fisher, widow of Francis Fisher (d. 1702), mariner, of Redcliffe p., 12 Apr. 1704; apprenticed to Charles Harford; freeman, 1677; sided with William Rogers; sufferer, 1682-3; signed the Bristol Friends' letter to Reading Friends asking them to heal their division, 1687; active on disciplinary appointments, from 1671; member of the Corporation of the Poor, Trinity ward; member of the Society for the Reformation of Manners, 1700; Peter's p. inhabitants, 1696, Cornelius Serjeant, Rebecca wf., William, Cornelius & Sarah, children (B.R.S. xxv. 159).

(3) England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013

Name: Cornelius Sarjant Senior
Event Type: Burial
Death Date: abt 1726
Burial Date: 7 Sep 1726
Burial Place: Christ Ch, England
Meeting: Monthly Meeting of Bristol
Piece Description: Piece 0666: Monthly Meeting of Bristol: Burials (1655-1780) 
SARJANT, Cornelius Sr. (I38947)
 
25207 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Alice [BALLARD], married (1) John Noel and (2) John Stanley (born 11 October 1691, died 17 July 1783) in New Kent county, Virginia. Their children were: 1. John Stanley (born 1725, died 1795, Surry county, North Carolina); 2. Shadrack Stanley (born 25 June 1736, died April 1792); 3. Elizabeth Stanley (born c. 1737); 4. Ann Stanley (born c. 1740, married _____ Strong; 5. Mary Stanley (born c. 1740); 6. Alice Stanley (born 1742, died between 1784-90, Yadkin county, North Carolina. 
BALLARD, Alice (I37502)
 
25208 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Ankey Ballard [BALLARD] (married James Keaton c. 1767, left issue). 
BALLARD, Ankey (I37490)
 
25209 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Ann [BALLARD] (married William Vawter). 
BALLARD, Ann (I37492)
 
25210 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Curtis [BALLARD] (married 23 April 1781 Esther Gaines, left issue). 
BALLARD, Curtis (I37495)
 
25211 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Delphia [BALLARD] (married a Mr Cummins). 
BALLARD, Delphia (I37500)
 
25212 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Elijah [BALLARD] (married Milly Dohaney). 
BALLARD, Elijah (I37501)
 
25213 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Johnson [BALLARD] (married 22 December 1791 Betty Eastham). 
BALLARD, Johnson (I37498)
 
25214 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Larkin [BALLARD] (married 19 January 1786 Elizabeth Gaines, left issue). 
BALLARD, Larkin (I37496)
 
25215 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Lucy [BALLARD] (married Joseph Harvey). 
BALLARD, Lucy (I37497)
 
25216 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Milly [BALLARD] (married (1) Jesse Watson and (2) John Boling). 
BALLARD, Milly (I37499)
 
25217 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Moorman [BALLARD] (married Minerva Bullock, left issue). 
BALLARD, Moorman (I37493)
 
25218 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Philip [BALLARD] (born 12 March 1757, served in the Revolutionary War, married Mary Dingess, died 13 April 1833 without issue). 
BALLARD, Philip Jr. (I37494)
 
25219 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

Thomas [BALLARD] (married Elizabeth Smith). 
BALLARD, Thomas (I37491)
 
25220 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

We have concluded that Bland Ballard of Spotsylvania County, John and Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Richard Ballard of Essex and Bedford Counties and William Ballard of Caroline County are the sons of an as yet unidentified progenitor of this line. As time allows, the narrative will be updated. Use the conclusions below with caution. . . .

The progenitor of this line of the Ballard family probably married a relation of the Bland family, which provided that name and others that recur repeatedly among these descendants. We do know that branches of the Bland family resided in that part of the Northern Neck of Virginia where William may have had property, and a branch resided along the James River in Charles City County. Forenames popular among the Northern Neck Blands appear in later generations of the Ballard family - namely George, James and Benjamin - among descendants of Bland Ballard.

These sons could have received their bequests from their father's estate as they came of age, at the discretion of their guardian, which could explain their sons' cash purchase of land - Bland Ballard in 1734, Thomas Ballard in 1738, and William Ballard in 1743.

Many include the little known Philip Ballard and sometimes Ambrose Bullard as part of this family, but there seem to have been no connection between these lines. Also, the author is of the opinion that the descendants of the Quaker branches may be related, but are more distant cousins. This suspicion that is strengthened by the results of genetic testing that place several descendants in Lineage Group III of the Ballard DNA Project. For this reason possible descendants are not carried further down in this work, at least for now. We do believe Richard, Bland, Thomas and John had a brother named William, but had difficulty distinguishing him from the other William Ballards then living in Caroline County.

Recent writings on the genealogy of William Ballard of Essex county and his descendants place him, without concrete proof, in Essex or King and Queen counties, Virginia. The number of William Ballards appearing in the records defy accurate accounting. A William Ballard is named in an action for debt brought by James Booth and Thomas Davis against Stephen Chenault and William Ballord on 15 September 1724. (Stephen Chenault was the father of Howlett Chenault, whose widow Mary Byum married another William Ballard and removed to Bedford County, Virginia). This William Ballard is believed to have died between 1741, when he last appeared in a court record, and 1753, when his widow, Philadelphia, conveyed her dower interest in a tract of land in Essex county.

He is believed to have married Philadelphia _____, who was living about 1751 and as late as 2 October 1754 in St. Anne's Parish, Essex county, Virginia, when an indenture was recorded on 2 October 1754 conveying Philadelphia's dower interest in land to John Lee of Essex county, her son John Ballard having sold the land to John Noell on 19 January 1747, who had in turn sold the land to John Lee. . . .

So here we have simply a release of dower interest in property that once belonged to her husband, inherited by the son, and sold by him to John Noell, who in turn sold it to John Lee. This does not prove - or even suggest - a connection between the Ballard and Lee families. There is an earlier deed dated 19 January 1747 that referenced "the line of old William Ballard," which likely refers to the property then owned by Philadelphia's husband, William. The John who conveyed the property to John Noell would have inherited it from his father William by right of primogeniture. In 1752 the John listed below was of age and living in Louisa County, so it is possible that this William is the progenitor of this line, but we are not yet convinced. Perhaps studying the background of Philadelphia's witnesses might provide a clue.

The children of _____ Ballard and _____ Bland were:

[i] RICHARD, who married Mary _____.

[ii] WILLIAM, of Essex and Caroline counties, Virginia.

[iii] BLAND, married Mary Deering.

[iv] THOMAS, married Susannah Hesson. . . .

[v] JOHN, married _____.

[vi] Alice, married (1) John Noel and (2) John Stanley (born 11 October 1691, died 17 July 1783) in New Kent county, Virginia. 
BALLARD, --- (I37421)
 
25221 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

We have concluded that Bland Ballard of Spotsylvania County, John and Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Richard Ballard of Essex and Bedford Counties and William Ballard of Caroline County are the sons of an as yet unidentified progenitor of this line. As time allows, the narrative will be updated. Use the conclusions below with caution. . . .

Many include the little known Philip Ballard and sometimes Ambrose Bullard as part of this family, but there seem to have been no connection between these lines. Also, the author is of the opinion that the descendants of the Quaker branches may be related, but are more distant cousins. This suspicion that is strengthened by the results of genetic testing that place several descendants in Lineage Group III of the Ballard DNA Project. For this reason possible descendants are not carried further down in this work, at least for now. We do believe Richard, Bland, Thomas and John had a brother named William, but had difficulty distinguishing him from the other William Ballards then living in Caroline County. . . .

Some researchers name a Philip, who married Ann Johnson, as a likely son, but individuals participating in the Ballard DNA Project who claim descent from him are in Lineage Group III - a different family. On 4 May 1746 he witnessed a deed from George Musick, Sr & Ann, his wife to Robert Beadles in Spotsylvania county. He owned land in Spotsylvania, having acquired 352 acres in Spotsylvania county on 30 October 1747 from Edmund Waller. He removed to Orange County; many of his descendants removed to what is now West Virginia and Kentucky. Their children were: 1. William (married Elizabeth Step; left issue); 2. Ankey Ballard (married James Keaton c. 1767, left issue); 3. Thomas (married Elizabeth Smith); 4. Ann (married William Vawter); 5. Moorman (married Minerva Bullock, left issue); 6. Philip (born 12 March 1757, served in the Revolutionary War, married Mary Dingess, died 13 April 1833 without issue); 7. Curtis (married 23 April 1781 Esther Gaines, left issue); 8. Larkin (married 19 January 1786 Elizabeth Gaines, left issue); 9. Lucy (married Joseph Harvey); 10. Johnson (married 22 December 1791 Betty Eastham); 11. Milly (married (1) Jesse Watson and (2) John Boling); 12. Delphia (married a Mr Cummins); 13. Elijah (married Milly Dohaney).

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Philip Ballard
Birth: 1704, Essex County, Virginia, USA
Death: Mar. 8, 1778, Orange County, Virginia, USA

Family links: Parents: William Ballard (1684 - 1754), Philadelphia Ludwell Lee Ballard (1682 - ____); Spouse: Ann Johnson Ballard (1720 - 1788); Children: William Ballard (1732 - 1799), Anne Ballard Vawter (1733 - 1814), Thomas Ballard (1741 - 1831), Elijah Ballard (1743 - 1829), Susannah Ballard Harvey (1753 - 1845), Anky Ballard Keaton (1760 - 1842); Siblings: Philip Ballard (1704 - 1778), William Ballard (1715 - 1794), Thomas Ballard (1716 - 1781)

Burial: Unknown

Created by: Sue Macduff
Record added: Oct 24, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 60561549 
BALLARD, Philip Sr. (I37487)
 
25222 (1) The Progenitor of the Ballards of Essex and Caroline Counties, Virginia:

William [BALLARD] (married Elizabeth Step; left issue).

(2) www.findagrave.com:

William Ballard
Birth: 1732 [?], Virginia, USA
Death: Sep. 14, 1799, Monroe County, West Virginia, USA

He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War

Family links: Parents: Philip Ballard (1704 - 1778), Ann Johnson Ballard (1720 - 1788); Spouse: Elizabeth Steppe Ballard (1752 - 1830); Children: Johnson Ballard (1775 - 1849), James Ballard (1783 - 1869), Emiley Ballard Mann (1787 - 1852), Jeremiah Ballard (1788 - 1879), Willis Ballard (1792 - 1881); Siblings: William Ballard (1732 - 1799), Anne Ballard Vawter (1733 - 1814), Thomas Ballard (1741 - 1831), Elijah Ballard (1743 - 1829), Susannah Ballard Harvey (1753 - 1845), Anky Ballard Keaton (1760 - 1842)

Burial: Cummings Cemetery, Greenville, Monroe County, West Virginia, USA

Created by: Matthew Broyles
Record added: Jul 09, 2000
Find A Grave Memorial# 5019106 
BALLARD, William (I37489)
 
25223 (1) The Sergeant surname has been spelled in various ways, including Sargaint, Sargan, Sargantt, Sargeant, Sargeante, Sargeaunt, Sargen, Sargent, Sargente, Sargentt, Sargian, Sargiaunt, Sargina, Sargon, Sarguant, Sargyant, Sargyeant, Sarjant, Sarjeant, Sarjent, Sarjiaunt, Seargeaunt, Searjeant, Searjeaunt, Sergante, Sergeant, Sergeante, Sergeaunt, Sergent, Sergiant, Sergint, Seriant, Seriante, Serient, Serjant, Serjante, Serjaunt, Serjeant, Serjeaunt, Serjent, Serjiant, Serjient, Serjint, and Serviens. The most common modern spelling of the surname appears to be Sargent. SERGEANT, Elizabeth (I38615)
 
25224 (1) The Shipley Clan of America, The Shipleys of Maryland: A Genealogical Study, Baltimore, MD: Reese Press, 1938, p. 116:

Benjamin Shipley of Richard of Richard of Adam, born August 6, 1751; died July 22, 1828; married (1) Rachel Frost, (2) Amelia Hobbs August 13, 1791. Children: (1) John, Caleb, Richard, Benjamin, Francis, and three daughters; (2) Henry, Nathan, Joshua, Elizabeth, Hamutal, Amelia, Eliza, Mary Ann, Rachel, Margaret, Lucy.
 
SHIPLEY, Benjamin (I29861)
 
25225 (1) The Shipley Clan of America, The Shipleys of Maryland: A Genealogical Study, Baltimore, MD: Reese Press, 1938, p. 202:

WILLIAM SHIPLEY

William Shipley, Sr., of Robert and Elizabeth (Stevens) Shipley, born in 1729; his will was probated in Anne Arundel County, April 1, 1794; married Rebecca Sellman. Their children: Robert Shipley, born in 1754, married February 26 (or 27), 1789, Providence Elder; Patience Shipley, born in 1757, married _____ Barnes; Rebecca Shipley, born in 1788, died in 1865, married Samuel B. Browning; Providence Shipley, born in 1772, died in 1819, married Absolom Shipley; William Shipley, born in 1755, died in 1819, married Susanna Sellman; Vachel Shipley, born in 1760, married Anne Garner; Elijah Shipley, born in 1762, married (1) Hannah Selby and (2) Milca Dean; Lloyd Shipley, born in 1758, married Margaret Frost; Levin Shipley, born in 1764; George Shipley, born in 1766, married Susanna Frost; and Jesse Shipley, born in 1768. 
SHIPLEY, William Sr. (I29890)
 
25226 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I36401)
 
25227 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I36388)
 
25228 (1) The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Inc.

First Name: Carl
Last Name: Frost
Ethnicity: Denmark, Scandinavian
Last Place of Residence: Als, Denmark
Date of Arrival: Mar 29, 1913
Age at Arrival: 22y
Gender: M
Marital Status: S
Ship of Travel: C.F. Tietgen
Port of Departure: Copenhagen
Manifest Line Number: 0008

(2) U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005:

Name: Carl Nielsen Frost
City: Racine
County: Racine
State: Wisconsin
Birthplace: Als, Denmark
Birth Date: 23 Mar 1890
Race: Caucasian (White)
Draft Board: 2
Age: 27
Occupation: Woodworker
Nearest Relative: Not specified
Height/Build: Medium/Medium
Color of Eyes/Hair: Dark Blue/Light Brown
Signature: Carl Nielsen Frost

(3) Georgia, Naturalization Records, 1793-1991 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012:

Name: Carl Nielsen Frost
Age: 28
Birthdate: 23 Mar 1890
Birth Place: Denmark
Record Date: 24 Jul 1918
Record Place: Augusta
Petition Number: 2160M
Court Location: Augusta, Georgia
Title/Description: Augusta Naturalization Petitions 7/18 - 7/18 (Box 12)
Record Type: Petitions

(4) A household headed by Carl N. FROST is listed in the 1920 census of Ward 6, Racine, Racine County, WI.

Carl N. is listed in the 1920 census as a carpenter who was then 30 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1890. According to the 1920 census, he was born in Denmark, and both of his parents were born in Denmark. According to the 1920 census, he immigrated to the United States in 1913, and became a naturalized American citizen in 1918.

Listed with Carl N. is his wife, Elsie, who was then 27 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1920 census, she was born in Denmark, and both of herparents were born in Denmark. According to the 1920 census, she immigrated to the United States in 1913, and became a naturalized American citizen in 1918.

(5) U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007:

Name: Carl Nielsen Frost
Birth Date: 23 Mar 1890
Birth Place: Denmark
Age: 31
Passport Issue Date: 25 Apr 1921
Passport Includes a Photo: Yes
Residence: Racine, Wisconsin
Father Name: Nerl Frost
Father's Birth Location: Denmark
Father's Residence: Denmark

(6) The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Inc.

First Name: Carl N.
Last Name: Frost
Ethnicity: US Citizen
Last Place of Residence: Racine, Wis.
Date of Arrival: Mar 31, 1922
Age at Arrival: 32y
Gender: M
Marital Status: M
Ship of Travel: Mauretania
Port of Departure: Southampton
Manifest Line Number: 0006

(7) A household headed by Carl N. FROST is listed in the 1930 census of Ward 13, Racine, Racine County, WI.

Carl N. is listed in the 1930 census as a carpenter who was then 40 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1890. According to the 1930 census, he was born in Denmark, and both of his parents were born in Denmark. According to the 1930 census, he was 27 years of age at his first marriage. Also, according to the 1930 census, he immigrated to the United States in 1913, and was a naturalized American citizen.

Listed with Carl N. is his wife, Elsie A. M., who was then 37 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1930 census, she was born in Denmark, and both of her parents were born in Denmark. According to the 1930 census, she was 25 years of age at her first marriage. Also, according to the 1930 census, she immigrated to the United States in 1893, and was a naturalized American citizen.

Also listed with Carl N. is his son, Richard C., who was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1923. According to the 1930 census, he was born in WI, and both of his parents were born in Denmark.

Also listed with Carl N. is his son, Donald J., who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1925. According to the 1930 census, he was born in WI, and both of his parents were born in Denmark.

(8) A household headed by Carl N. FROST is listed in the 1940 census of Ward 11, Racine, Racine County, WI.

Carl N. is listed in the 1940 census as a carpenter who was then 50 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1890. According to the 1940 census, he was born in Denmark and was a naturalized American citizen. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

Listed with Carl N. is his wife, Elsie, who was then 47 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1940 census, she was born in Denmark and was a naturalized American citizen. According to the 1940 census, her residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

Also listed with Carl N. is his son, Richard, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1923. According to the 1940 census, he was born in WI. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

Also listed with Carl N. is his son, Donald, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1925. According to the 1940 census, he was born in WI. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

(9) Wisconsin Death Index, 1959-1997 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007:

Name: Carl N Frost
Death Date: 14 Jun 1987
Location: Racine (May be abbreviated)
Certificate: 014139

(10) Social Security Death Index:

Name: Carl Frost
SSN: 391-01-0859
Last Residence: 53404 Racine, Racine, Wisconsin, USA
Born: 23 Mar 1890
Died: Jun 1987
State (Year) SSN issued: Wisconsin (Before 1951)

(11) www.findagrave.com:

Carl N Frost
Birth: 1890
Death: 1987

Family links: Spouse: Elsie A Frost (1892 - 1975)

Burial: Mound Cemetery, Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin, USA

Created by: Luanne
Record added: Jun 24, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 131838786 
FROST, Carl Nielsen (I36179)
 
25229 (1) The Usborne Family - Descendants of Thomas Usborne of Goudhurst in Kent, England who died in 1548 :

Alexander Usborne

Baptised May 9th,1681 at Marden. Marriage licence February 19th, 1715 to Mary Foster of West Tarring, Sussex. Alexander died 1737 at Lindfield, Sussex. Mary buried 1761 at Ware.

Alexander was described in parish register as a "gentleman". He inherited land in the parish of Loose in his father's will and several parcels of land by the Church Green at Marden on the death of his brother William in 1717. He probably also inherited land in East Farleigh from his brother Thomas who died young. Did he sell all his land when he moved just over the Kent border to Lindfield in Sussex (before 1715)? 
USBORNE, Alexander (I35827)
 
25230 (1) The Usborne Family - Descendants of Thomas Usborne of Goudhurst in Kent, England who died in 1548 :

Esther [Ustborne]

Born August 11th 1722 at Lindfield. Married Benjamin Merchant on August 22nd 1762 in Strood, Kent. Benjamin was a Tallow Chandler of Dartford in Kent. 
USBORNE, Esther (I35825)
 
25231 (1) The usual spelling of Nancy's maiden name appears to have been VINEYARD. VINEYARD, Nancy O. (I36979)
 
25232 (1) The Vanguard, The Newsletter of the van Aersdalen Family Association, Vol. VI, No. 1 (July 2003), pp. 3-10:

SIJMON JANSZ VAN AERSDALEN

In 1628, Flanders was besieged. The rolling hills and verdant plains of Europe's arguably wealthiest province was one of the main theaters in the Eighty Years' War, pitting Spanish, French, and Dutch troops against one another in a war of political advantage and religious freedom.

Flanders had been part of the Spanish Netherlands since 1516, when Charles V, a scion of the Habsburg Empire, ascended the throne. Charles was the son of Philip I of the Low Countries and Princess Joanna of Spain, Philip being the heir of the Habsburgs from his father Archduke Maximilian and Joanna being the heir of Castile and Aragon from her parents Ferdinand and Isabella (the noted royal financiers of Christopher Columbus). Charles V ushered in an era of prosperity for Flanders but at the expense of widening the gap between the upper and lower classes. In 1555, he abdicated the throne in favor of his son, Philip II.

Philip II had little interest in preserving the existing ruling class in the Low Countries and was particularly intolerant of the lower classes. At about this time, the fledgling spirit of Calvinism was spreading throughout the Low Countries and Philip II, a fervent Catholic, resolved himself to crush the religion before it resulted in any further subversion to his rule. Suspected Calvinist "Protestants" were arrested, interrogated, tortured, expelled, and even executed as the King sought to root out the evil influence. This tinderbox erupted into flames when, in 1566, Protestants pulled down and destroyed statues they considered idolatrous at several Catholic churches. King Philip responded by imposing martial law, sending troops under the merciless Duke of Alva to squelch the uprising. Instead of smothering the fire, the action only fanned the flames, and the
Eighty Years' War began.

In 1573, after seven of the bloodiest years in Flanders' history, the Duke of Alva was replaced by a more moderate "governor" who facilitated the signing of a peace accord for the southern provinces of the Low Countries. The diplomatic process was, nevertheless, enforced militarily. Flanders and neighboring Brabant province became effectively Catholic in 1579, but the Protestants could either worship in secret or emigrate to the northern provinces which had become officially Protestant. Many chose the latter option.

The remaining Protestant population of Flanders had been greatly diminished and over the years the Protestant-Catholic rift widened irreparably. Protestants were now being hunted down, tried as heretics and witches, and burned at the stake.

Beneath this cloud of political and religious upheaval, a child is born in Nukerke, East Flanders. He was baptized on Sunday, February 27, 1628 to Jan Pauwelsz van Aersdalen and Gerarda (Geertje) Philipse Haelters, and named Sijmon, possibly after one of the witnesses, Sijmon de Keyser. Dutch tradition - and probably Flemish as well - dictated that a mother not go out in public for six weeks after childbirth, and only then for the purpose of the child's baptism. If this custom was followed, then we can assume that Sijmon was born in the first half of January 1628.

Sijmon was the third known son of Jan Pauwelsz, a carpet or cloth-weaver, which was a popular vocation in East Flanders at that time. It is possible that another son had been born before Sijmon but baptized at a different church. Sijmon's siblings eventually included brothers Philip (Philippus, baptized June 24, 1624), possibly a Pauwel, Jan (Joannes, baptized March 22, 1626), Pieter (probably born about 1630 in Flanders), and Joost (Judocus, baptized October 2, 1638), as well as sisters Egidia (baptized April 10, 1633) and Joanna (baptized December 4, 1635). It is likely that Sijmon also had a sister named Fiermijne named for their paternal grandmother. The last known baptismal record for a child of Jan and Gerarda's was that of Joost.

However, bringing more children into a war-torn world was a logistically if not morally questionable act. Tensions escalated in the area and troops routinely ebbed and flowed through Flanders. Oudenaarde, just three miles across the Schelde River from Nukerke, was the scene of several bloody skirmishes. Around 1640, Jan decided to abandon Nukerke and seek out the relative stability of the Protestant-dominated Northern Provinces. Jan took his family to Gouda (where, it appears, his parents were married in 1588) and likewise abandoned his vocation as a carpetweaver to become a mustard-grinder. On July 20, 1642 Jan was confirmed (as "Jan van Arsdal") as a member of the Dutch Reformed Church at Gouda. He bought a house for his family on November 21 of that year and eight years later purchased the adjacent one as well.

Sijmon had an itch to strike out on his own. Barely in his twenties, he moved away from the rest of the family in Gouda to seek his fortune in the metropolis of Amsterdam. This is probably the first evidence of the drive of this young man who would dare to venture into a New World and become the patriarch of a large and successful family. In Amsterdam, he pursued a career in pottery-making, which had become so prolific an industry that several streets in the city were dedicated to the trade. Starting around 1600, many potters from the Southern Netherlands (Belgium) fled to Amsterdam to escape religious persecution and the fragmentation of the local pottery industry. Consequently, Amsterdam blossomed into a major supplier of pottery, especially fa??ence and Delftware styles. However, the proliferation of so many pottery shops resulted in widespread and occasionally devastating outbreaks of fire, and when Amsterdam expanded in 1621, all potteries were banned to the outside of the city. One important center was located along the river Amstel, just outside the St. Anthony's port city-gate. It was there that, by 1650, Sijmon had taken up residence on a street called Pottebakkerspad or "potter's path".

On March 26, 1650, Sijmon produced documentation of his father's consent in order to marry Marritje Baltusdr, an orphan two years his junior.

"Compareerden als vooren Simon Janss. van Niekerck, pottebacker, out 22 jaer, vertoon. acte van vaders consent, woonen. opt Pottebackerspadt ende Marritie Baltus van A., out 20 jaer, woon. int Lelystraetje, geen ouders hebbende (appeared as before Simon Janss from Niekerck, a potter, aged 22 years, producing a letter of consent from his father, living in potter's path and Marritie Baltus, from Amsterdam, aged 20 years, living in Leliestreet, having no parents (parents deceased)."

They were wed at the Oude Kerk, the oldest church in Amsterdam, by Rev. Borsius on April 19, 1650. Sijmon was young, had a beautiful bride and a promising, stable job; the future looked bright.

The couple's first child, daughter Sijlijntje, was born in January 1651. She was baptized at the Zuiderkerk on February 26, 1651. Sijlijntje was probably named after Marritje's mother, while Sijmon's mother served as a witness. According to Dutch tradition, the next daughter would be named for Sijmon's mother, Gerarda or Geertje, but Sijmon's mother would not live long enough to enjoy that honor. In October, she passed away and was buried on the 30th of that month at St. Jan's Kerk in Gouda. Not long thereafter, widower Jan Pauwelsz began courting widow Margarieta Philipsdr. They were married in Haastrecht near Gouda on August 20, 1652, some ten months after Geertje's passing.

Sijmon's first son, Jan Simonsz, was baptized on November 19, 1652 at Nieuwe Kerk. He was obviously named for his paternal grandfather. With his family growing, Sijmon - again seeking opportunities - began looking for a better way of life, a house inside the city walls, a better income. Opportunity soon finds him. For years, there had been a strong recruiting effort to populate New Netherland with young, energetic "fortuneseekers". In fact, the Secretary of the New Netherland colony, Cornelis van Tienhoven, wrote a pamphlet dated March 4, 1650 entitled "Information Relative to Taking Up Land in New Netherland, in the Form of Colonies or Private Bouweries". This "brochure" was an explicit enticement for would-be colonists and was circulated throughout Holland. It is possible that Sijmon, now almost 25, read some of the persuasive literature printed by the Dutch West India Company and became enamored by the lure of the New World. Family history states that Sijmon, a potter, was sent to New Netherland to study the utility of the native clays for pottery making. If so, no evidence has yet been uncovered to substantiate this assertion. No potters' guild existed in Amsterdam at that time, so if Sijmon was an apprentice to a New Netherland-looking master potter, we cannot corroborate such motivation. Further, Sijmon's name does not appear on any of the almost fifty Amsterdam notaries' records of 1653, settling any business (such as signing a contract with an employer or paying debts) prior to embarking on his journey. There is no documentation regarding who paid for Sijmon's way to New Netherland, whether by himself or by a patron. The average cost to sail to New Amsterdam at that time was about 36 florins. Whatever instigated his plan, Sijmon Jansz van Aersdalen decided to venture to New Netherland in 1653.

When did Sijmon leave? Sijmon's older brother, Philip, was married in Gouda on May 13, 1653. It is believed that the two brothers were close, and so it is likely that Sijmon wished to attend his brother's wedding. Consequently, we can assume that he left Amsterdam after May. Recently, it has become known that two ships made the journey from Amsterdam to New Netherland that year, both departing at the same time. These ships were the Coninck Salomon and the Geldersche Blom (King Solomon and the Flower of Gelderland). (Family history states that Sijmon sailed aboard the Dynasty. No vessel by that name was known to have made the journey to New Netherland.) The two ships left Amsterdam on Saturday, August 23, 1653 for the Dutch island of Texel, there to begin the trans-Atlantic voyage.

Amsterdam was not situated on a coastline of the ocean or a major sea, such as the North Sea. What today is reclaimed polderland around Amsterdam was, in the 17th century, open water - the Zuiderzee. Some 60 miles of the Zuiderzee had to be traversed before reaching Texel and the North Sea. Once at the harbor of Texel, weather conditions dictated any further sailing. Consequently, due to the capricious nature of the North Sea, many ships had to wait - sometimes for weeks - for the weather to improve satisfactorily. Additionally, Texel was a vital source of fresh water for the long journey. Many wells on the island had been dug specifically for the travelers, and the water bought from them was used to finance a local orphanage. The water in Amsterdam was notoriously foul even in those days, as effluents from tanneries and linenbleaching fields found their noxious ways into the Amstel.

The Coninck Salomon was a WIC (West India Company) ship while the Geldersche Blom was a "galjoot". A galjoot, or galliot, was a long, narrow light-draft Dutch merchant ship carrying a mainmast and a jigger with a mainsail having a long foot and short gaff. It is known that the Geldersche Blom carried passengers as well as cargo.

From Texel, the Dutch ships embarked on the journey following one of four well-established routes. Although we may never know the exact route Sijmon took, we can narrow it down to the two most likely crossings.

From Holland, the ships first sailed past the southern tip of England, on occasion stopping for supplies or repairs at Portsmouth or Plymouth. This was not the case in 1653, however, as the First English War was raging, and docking a Dutch ship at an English harbor was ill-advised. Otherwise, the ships continued on along the coasts of Spain and Portugal destined for a stopover either at the Canary or, further south, Cape Verde Islands.

If Sijmon's ship went to the Cape Verde Islands, they sailed past the west coast of Africa on their way to Brazil along the North Equatorial Current, aided by the Northeast Trade Wind. This took them to the Leeward Islands of the Caribbean (probably Cura??ao or perhaps Tobago). From that locale, they caught the Antilles Stream to the Gulf Stream along the eastern North American coast to their destination, the mouth of the Hudson River.

If Sijmon's ship instead enjoyed a stopover at the Canary Islands, they would then turn west to either the Leeward or the Windward Islands (the Netherlands Antilles) of St. Kitts, St. Eustace, St. Maarten, or St. Saba. From either archipelago, the ships would then follow the Antilles Stream north to the Gulf Stream and then on to the Hudson River.

The Geldersche Blom anchored at New Amsterdam on Sunday, November 2, 1653 with the Coninck Salomon arriving one day later. The trans-Atlantic trip had taken a little over two months, an average time in those days.

Where did Sijmon go upon his arrival? It can be assumed that employment was waiting for him; if he had been sent to New Netherland to study the native clays, he would have a potter's shop to report to and, probably, a master potter under whose wing he would be taken. Sijmon would undoubtedly live near this potter's shop, either with the potter or at a boarding house close by. Even if he had not been sent, i.e. he had gone on his own free will, he would have to work as a potter, as there is no reason to assume he could make a living doing anything else, initially. Because Sijmon intended to return to Holland, we must assume he did not buy a house during his early years in New Netherland. It is unclear whether Sijmon lived in New Amsterdam upon his arrival or moved to New Amersfoort (Flatlands) on Long Island.

Not long after his arrival, Sijmon received bad news from home. In January 1654, Sijmon's father Jan died in Gouda. He was buried in St. Jan's Kerk on January 12, 1654. Sijmon's brother Philip appeared in court on March 10, 1654 to attest that the minor children of their father would have a guardian:

"Philip Jansz Aesdael certifies he will assume guardianship of the minor children of the late Jan Poulissen van Aesdal and Geertje Philips".

Shortly thereafter, Philip again goes to court to seek permission from the Gouda town council to sell his father's houses in order to provide for the minor children. This is granted on April 24, 1654.

"Philip Jansz Aersdaalen, on behalf of himself acting as a guardian to his minor brother Pieter Jansz and as a proxy to his brother Sijmon Jansz van Aersdale who is staying abroad, being the children and heirs to Jan Pauwlesz van Aersdael sells two houses and land in Naaierstraat at Gouda to Pieter van Stompwijk at ƒ1130, - ".

Family history relates that Sijmon was about to return to Holland when he learned of the death of his wife and children. Although the timing of his intended return has not been corroborated, it is now known that his wife, Marritje, and at least one but probably both of his children were, indeed, victims of the plague. (Plague deaths in Amsterdam in 1655 were tallied at 16,727 or roughly 12.5% of the city's inhabitants). On November 18, 1655 "a child of Seymen Janssen, potter" was buried in St. Anthony's churchyard, Amsterdam, followed by its mother only eight days later. This information probably reached Sijmon by late summer/early fall 1656. In a little over a four-year period, Sijmon had lost his parents, his wife, and his children. Devastated, Sijmon had little to return to, and seeing before him his home away from home for the last three years and a land with limitless possibilities, he decided to cast his lot with the enterprising Dutch New World.

Again as a young man in another thriving community, Sijmon's prospects were propitious. He began courting Pieterje Claese van Schouw, a daughter of tobacco merchant Claes (Nicholas) Cornelissen van Schouw. Sijmon and Pieterje married about 1658, presumably in Flatlands. Their first child was born probably in the next year, and named Geertje in honor of her paternal grandmother.

In the meantime, perhaps with the help of his father-in-law, Sijmon began gaining civic prominence. On May 3, 1660 Sijmon was appointed a schepen of New Amersfoort (Flatlands). A schepen was a magistrate who presided over cases in town court and was a combination of sheriff and alderman in addition to a magistrate. One of his responsibilities was the review and passing of local laws and ordinances. In the words of Hoppin, Sijmon "seems early . . . to have possessed an ability and influence in matters political that caused him to be selected over older men of longer residence . . . to represent Amersfoort". Indeed, at the age of 35, Sijmon was chosen to represent Amersfoort in a "Convention Holden at New Amsterdam, on July 3, 1663, to engage the several Dutch towns to keep up an armed force for public protection".

But not everything is easy for Sijmon. On Tuesday, August 28, 1663, "Sijmon Janzen" appears in court against carpenter Jan Teunizen and witnesses Willem Steenhalder and wife, claiming that Teunizen wouldn't release a house to Sijmon for which he had been paid. The court requested further proof from Sijmon, and so on September 4th, "Sijmon Janzen Asdalen" produces testimonials from two witnesses (whose identities were undisclosed in the published transcription). Teunizen is still unmoved, so Sijmon challenges him to take an oath before the court regarding the terms of the sale. Teunizen refuses, but Sijmon agrees to go on record with his own oath. Finding this satisfactory, the court rules in favor of Sijmon and he takes possession of the house.

(This appears to be the same Jan Teunizen who may have accompanied Sijmon to New Netherland in 1653. If so, this would be Jan Teunizen van Duykhuis, also a resident of Flatlands. In The Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, Danckaerts held Jan Teunissen in low esteem. "He welcomed us, but somewhat coldly, and so demeaned himself all the time we were there, as to astonish my comrade at the change, but not me entirely, for I had observed this falling off while we were yet at sea. . . ." Jan Teunizen had apparently returned to Holland for some business and had come back to New Netherland on the same ship as Danckaerts in June 1679.)

In February 1664, Sijmon and his father-in-law become further involved in the building tensions with the British. On the 19th, they and three other witnesses appear before a notary at Midwout (Flatbush) to testify about a public disturbance caused by English captain John Scott. Sijmon signs his name to the document and attests to being 35. (However, if he was baptized in February 1628, he would have been 36.)

"Before me, Pelgrom Clocq . . . and the undernamed witnesses, appeared Claes Cornelissen, aged 67 years, Symon Janse, aged 35 years, both residents of the village of Amesfoort . . . who declare and testify . . . at the request of Mr. Adrian Hegeman, Sheriff, residing in the village of Midwout, by and in the presence of Pieter Claesen and Roelof Martens, Schepens of Amesfoort, that it is true and truthful that Captain John Schot, an Englishman, came into their, the deponents' village, on the 12th of January last, with a troop of horse and making a great noise. And first the abovenamed Claes Cornelissen declares that he heard John Schot declare at the time that this place, in The Bay, was a free place because it was bought and was not Company's property; also, that he, John Schot, said that he would return on the first of April, Old Style, and then open and exhibit his commission; forbidding him, the deponent, to pay the Company any Tenths, as the place belonged to the King."

Then, on the 27th, Sijmon and Claes participate in a convention in Midwout which they instigated, bringing together the Director-General and Council of New Netherland "to lay before the States General and West India Company the distressed state of the country". The tormenting by the British had accelerated, and the Dutch found themselves being surrounded.

On September 8th, 1664, the Director-General of New Netherland, Pieter Stuyvesant, relinquished the Dutch colony to the British after four British warships with over 1000 men threatened them from New York Bay. At first, the defiant Stuyvesant cursed the English when confronted with a document agreeing to surrender the colony, tearing the paper to shreds and stomping upon it with his wooden leg. However, in his attempt to muster the Dutch forces against the British, he soon found himself all alone. New Netherland had grown to a population close to 10,000 people by that date, but some 20-40% of those were non-Dutch already.

Beginning in 1665, Sijmon's attentions turned to acquiring land as evidenced by numerous entries in the Flatlands Town Records. Many lots and parcels of "land and meddow ground" were purchased by Sijmon between 1665 and 1686, thereby establishing farms to suit his likewise burgeoning family. In addition to daughter Geertje (born ca. 1659), Cornelis Sijmonsz is born about 1665 and Sijmon's only other son, Jan Sijmonsz, is born in 1676. Daughter Jannetje Simonse is born about 1668, Metje Sijmonse is born about 1670, and his last child, Maritje Simonse, is born in 1678, but is believed to have died young.

His eldest daughter, Geertje, married Cornelis Pietersz Wyckoff at the Dutch Reformed Church in New Utrecht on October 13, 1678. On December 11, 1681, Sijmon and Pieterje were present when their first grandchild, Marije, is baptised at the Dutch Reformed Church in Breuckelen. Sijmon is 54 years old at that time. Geertje and Cornelis' second son, Sijmon, named for Sijmon Jansz, is baptised in Amersfoort on November 23, 1683 as witnessed by "Simon Jansz" and "Pietertje Klaas".

On March 23, 1686, Sijmon purchases from Cornelis Willemsz (van Westervelt) "Nos. 30, 31, and 32 of the 15 acre allotments of Gravesend, with the right of commonage on the beach and on Coney Island". This appears to be Sijmon's last purchase of land. A year later, on March 16th, Sijmon's oldest son Cornelis Sijmonsz married Aeltje Willemse van Kouwenhoven at the Dutch Reformed Church of Flatbush. It would not be until October 20, 1695 before his other son, Jan Sijmonsz, would marry Lammetje Probasco.

One of the more important documents related to Sijmon was the Oath of Allegiance taken September 30th, 1687. This record indicates that Sijmon, listed as "Simon Janse Van Aerts Daalen", had been in this country for 34 years, thus establishing his time of arrival, while his son "Cornelis Simonsen Van Aerts Daalen" was recorded as a native, i.e. born here. This oath also tabulated other Dutchmen who had been in this country for 34 years, hence potential shipmates of our ancestor, these being: Reynier Aertsen of Flatbush; Ruth Joosten Van Brunt and Jan Van Cleef of New Utrecht; Jan Teunisz Van Dyckhuyse, Willem Davies, and Ruth Bruynsen of Flatlands; and Stoffel Janse Romeyn and Jochem Gulick of Gravesend. By this time, Sijmon had become prosperous and an outstanding member of the religious and civic communities.

Sijmon spent more of his latter years in church pursuits and keeping up with his family in North America - although not with the family back in Holland. In 1698, Sijmon received a letter from his brother Joost which informed Sijmon of the death of his niece Geertruyt. Geertruyt remembered her uncle Sijmon and his family in her will, and in a letter dated September 9th, Sijmon wrote back to Holland and his brother for the first time in many years, if ever before.

". . . I let you know that I, your brother, and my wife and children are in good health yet, thank God for His grace and we hope to learn the same from you in due time; I wonder you didn't write about our niece; farther I let you know all my children are married and each of them is living in a farmhouse that earns their livelihood; I sold my farm to my eldest son Cornelis, 33 years of age, has got five children, three sons, two daughters; my son Jan, 22 years of age, has got two sons; my daughter Geertje has got eight children; Janneken has got five children; Mettgen has got three children; they are comfortably off but they have to work which God commanded Adam; as for me, your brother, I stopped working since I am 71 years old now, my wife is 58 years of age and you, my brother, are, if I remember rightly, 60 years of age; God be pleased to give us a blessed end. . . ."

The same year, a census was taken for Kings County, New York and in the town of "Fflatlands" or New Amersfoort were listings for "Simon Jantz Van Aersdaelen" and "Cornelis Simontz Van Aersdaelen". Sijmon's house contained 2 men, 3 women, and 1 slave, while Cornelis's house contained 1 man, 1 woman, 6 children, and 1 slave. It can be assumed that the other man in the household was son Jan, then 22 years old.

On May 10, 1700, Sijmon sold the three 15-acre lots he'd bought from Cornelis Willemsz van Westervelt in 1686 to his eldest son Cornelis Sijmonsz. Cornelis now had a sizeable farm on which to raise his large family.

Sijmon continued to be physically active at least into his eightieth year. Riker notes:

"Mortgage dated May 11, 1699 to Simon Janse Van Aersdale of Amersfoort on a house in Broad St. given by Joost Leynsen of N.Y. baker & Elizabeth his wife. A memorandum in the margin states that Simon Jansen Van Aersdale of Amersford in Kings Co. Yeoman, personally came on Apl 2, 1707 into the office of the Town Clerk of N.Y. & cancelled the mortgage."

The last record of Sijmon's good deeds occurred around February 23, 1710. In the Deacon's Book of the Flatlands Dutch Reformed Church is a note tabulating the donations given by twenty contributors. The largest sum, 40 guldens, was donated by Sijmon.

Sijmon passed away in late October of that year. His death was recorded in the Deacon's Book as "1710, October 29. Received from Cornelus Van Arsdale for a grave and shroud for Symon Van Arsdale, 24 guldens". Hoppin further states that Sijmon's grave "was in the churchyard of the Flatlands Dutch Reformed Church, from which the gravestones of the early residents of the town have disappeared". And so our ancestor passed into history at the age of 83. 
VAN AERSDALEN, Sijmon Jansz (I21326)
 
25233 (1) The Walton Tribune, Monroe, GA, Wednesday, April 28, 1993, Page 4-B:

By Lewis Hales
Special to The Walton Tribune

WALTON COUNTY - One of the most remarkable citizens of early Walton County was Elizabeth Hales. Elizabeth moved to Walton County on March 4, 1830, after buying 80 acres of land from her son in law, Willie Cooper. As a widow at the age of 52, Elizabeth settled in the Mountain District where she raised her 10 children over the next 20 years.

Elizabeth was born in Johnston County, N.C., in 1778 and was the daughter of Joseph Spincer [sic; should be Spicer]. Joseph had migrated from Virginia and settled in Johnston County, where he served the community as a constable. The name of Joseph's wife is unknown. Elizabeth married John Hales, son of James and Elizabeth Hales, on August 13, 1795 in Johnston County. About 1796, both the Hales and Spicer families moved to Oglethorpe County, Ga. Oglethorpe deed records document that John and Elizabeth first bought land in the county on January 14, 1797.

Other documented children of Joseph Spicer were Patrick, Biddy, Mary and James. Elizabeth's brother James had served as an officer during the Revolutionary War in the Fifth North Carolina regiment.

To John and Elizabeth were born Sarah, Matilda, Biddy, Allen Jr., Henry J., James M., Jane Elizabeth, Thomas J., Joseph L., William G., and Mary Ann Hales.

On November 11, 1808, John and Elizabeth moved to Clarke County, Ga., where John died in 1822. At this time Elizabeth had been pregnant with Mary Ann for seven months. Both John and Elizabeth were devoted Baptist and were members of the Trail Creek Baptist Church when they lived in Clarke County.

Sarah, the oldest daughter, married Apple White Wright of North Carolina on February 22, 1821, and moved to Walton County and settled near Elizabeth. Some of the children of Apple and Sarah were Erasemus, Harriet, Amanda and Socrates. Apple and his family were charter members of Mount Vernon Christian Church in Walton County and on occasion Apple acted as trustee for church business transactions.

It is likely that a reason why Obediah Hales, brother-in-law to Elizabeth, moved to Walton County was to help provide support to Elizabeth and her children.

Obediah died in the county on October 20, 1873. Matilda married Matthew Hales on November 20, 1828, and both died in Walton County. Some of their children were Mary, William, John, James, Hariot and Robert. Biddy married Willis Cooper on February 17, 1828, and, according to the book Wayfarers In Walton, Willie was elected captain of the 454 Mountain District on December 18, 1849. His opponent was Alexander Winbush, who had acquired three votes, while Cooper had attained 38 votes. Allen J. Hales married Nancy Wright, suspected sister of Apple, on October 19, 1828, in Walton County and lived there about 10 years before moving to Clarke County. Thomas married Ann Waters in Walton on October 11, 1837, and their known children were Sophronica, John, James and Sarah. Thomas was still living in the county after 1860. Henry moved to Greene County, Georgia, where he died in 1859. Jane Elizabeth married James H. Nowell, son of James Nowell of North Carolina, on January 12, 1840, in Walton County. Their children were James, Elizabeth Ann, Anison, Martha, Emiline, John and Sarah.

James and Jane were charter members of the Mount Vernon Christian Church, and on occasion James was appointed trustee to conduct church transactions. Joseph was living in Walton County in 1850 with his children Ann, James, Demetrus and Sophronia. Not much information has been obtained about James and William.

Mary Ann married Thomas J. Magaughey on July 12, 1864. Thomas was the son of Dr. Thomas J. Magaughey, who was a prominent physician in Walton County. Mary Ann died on May 14, 1885, in Walton County and is buried at the Mount Vernon Christian Church.

Elizabeth lived in Walton County longer than any other place in her lifetime and resided there up until just before she died. In 1850, Elizabeth and her daughter, Mary Ann Hales, moved with the John N. Patrick family to Jackson County, Ga. The following year Elizabeth sold the last of her property to her son, Thomas, and it is believed that Elizabeth died in Jackson County about 1853.

Elizabeth was a responsible family provider and lived a simple lifestyle. She worked the fields to put food on the table and probably sought extra work doing baking or spinning whenever possible to secure additional income. She was a wise business planner and usually bought from and sold her property to her children and sons-in-law. Her strong devotion and love for her children combined with support from other family and friends helped her to make ends meet during difficult times.

Elizabeth's spiritual faith was an important resource in which she often found strength and serenity. She lived to see many grandchildren and, in her later years was taken very good care of by hewr [sic] family. She had been essential in helping her children survive through a time of loss, grief and financial insecurity created by her husband's death.

At the close of her life, Elizabeth no doubt reviewed all her efforts with a deep sense of accomplishment andf [sic] fulfillment.

If there are any readers of The Walton Tribune who would like to know more about this family - or if anyone has any more information about them - feel free to write to: Lewis Hales, 141 Evans Road, Milner 30257.

Lewis Hales is a direct descendent of the Hales family, as Elizabeth was his great-great-great-grandmother. 
SPICER, Martha Elizabeth (I28722)
 
25234 (1) The Weald :

The ancestral pedigree of Thomas Balcomb: . . .

Mary Monk
b: c 1690
d: January 1746[/7], Heathfield, Sussex
bur: 8th Jan 1746[/7], All Saints Church, Heathfield, Sussex 
MONK, Mary (I35727)
 
25235 (1) The wife of Alexander MEBANE, Sr. is mentioned in his will dated 30 April 1789, but her name is not stated in that will.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Mary Tinnin Mebane
Birth: 1716, Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Unknown

Married Alexander Mebane in 1740 in Pennsylvania.

NOTE: Burial location unknown. Some researchers claim burial was in Hawfields Presbyterian Cemetery, but Church records don't support that. The details are as follow:

Camille Aydt's research includes talking to the current pastor of the church, who reported that there is no record of an interment for either Alexander Mebane Sr. or his son, Alexander Mebane Jr. at the current [Second] Hawfields Presbyterian Church Cemetery. This church was rebuilt in 1859 and the only records of burials started in the early 1800's. The pastor also had a listing of people they believe were buried in the old [First] Hawfields Cemetery from early church records and neither Alexander was listed. The original church was built in the mid 1750's and the old cemetery has only a handful of stones, none of which are legible today and the cemetery itself is in total disrepair. Camille was also able to contact the greenskeeper for the Hawfields Presbyterian Church Cemetery, who confirmed that Alexander Mebane Sr. is not buried there. He did, however, tell her that Alexander was listed on the first church's roll in a book "Church in the Old Fields" by Herbert Turner. This source states that Alexander Mebane Sr. was too old for service during the Revolutionary War, but he used his grist mills to supply food for the war and that he was also the Sheriff in 1753. It is possible that both Alexander Sr. (died 1792) and Alexander Jr. (died 1795) are buried in the old [First] Hawfields Cemetery, but it may not be possible today to prove or disprove this theory. Diane Gravlee, who took the overview photo of the cemetery as posted for the Hawfields Presbyterian Church Cemetery on Findagrave, reports that the tall monument in the photograph is for Stephen A. White, who died in 1908 and the plot surrounded by the curbing is for the White family. Some researchers appear to be claiming the tall monument as Alexander Mebane Sr.'s grave marker and this is not correct.

Family links: Spouse: Alexander Mebane (1716 - 1792)

Burial: Unknown

Created by: RTerry
Record added: Nov 20, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 31565707 
TINNIN, Mary (I39855)
 
25236 (1) The will of Christopher RANDALL, Jr., dated 23 September 1734, and proved on or about 28 March 1735, provided in part as follows:

"To my son, Roger Randall, my dwelling plantation, containing four hundred and twenty-nine acres, called 'Stout.'"
 
RANDALL, Roger (I29929)
 
25237 (1) The will of James William LINDSEY, Sr., dated 11 May 1766 and probated on 26 September 1768, provides as follows:

I give to granddaughter Elizabeth, daughter of James Lindsey all my pewter.
 
LINDSEY, Elizabeth (I42728)
 
25238 (1) The will of James William LINDSEY, Sr., dated 11 May 1766 and probated on 26 September 1768, provides as follows:

I give to my granddaughter Susanna Lindsey, daughter of James Lindsey one cow.
 
LINDSEY, Susanna (I42727)
 
25239 (1) The year of Mattie (TRAINER) DeSHIELD's birth reported in her death and burial records is about 10 years later than the year of her birth derived from census records.

(2) Tennessee, Deaths and Burials Index, 1874-1955 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011:

Name: Mattie De Sheilds [Mattie De Trainer]
Birth Date: 11 Sep 1881
Birth Place: Tald County, KY
Age: 53
Death Date: 10 Aug 1934
Death Place: Mont County, Tennessee
Burial Date: 11 Aug 1934
Burial Place: Oakland Cem
Gender: Female
Race: White
Marital Status: Widowed
Occupation: Housekeeper
Father's Name: Ed Trainer
Mother's name: Lue French
Mother's Birth Place: Kentucky
FHL Film Number: 1876816

(3) www.findagrave.com:

Mattie DeShields
Birth: 1873
Death: 1934

Burial: Oakland Church of Christ Cemetery, Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee, USA

Created by: Gene Hill
Record added: Dec 23, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 82309850 
TRAINER, Mattie (I37128)
 
25240 (1) The year of Rhoda FROST's birth, as derived from the following censuses, was as follows: 1831 (1850 census), 1831 (1860 census), 1834 (1870 census), 1833 (1880 census) and 1836 (1900 census).

(2) A household headed by Rhoda HARTON is listed in the 1860 census of Anderson County, TN, next to a household headed by her mother, Elizabeth FROST. [The compiler believes that Rhoda's surname was really HORTON.]

Rhoda is listed in the 1860 census as a person who was then 29 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1831. According to the 1880 census, she was born in TN.

Listed with Rhoda is her son, Elijah W., who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Rhoda is her son, Benjamine, who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Rhoda is her son, George W., who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1857. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN.

(3) A household headed by Rhoda HORTON is listed in the 1870 census of District 4, Anderson County, TN.

Rhoda is listed in the 1870 census as a person who was then 36 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1834. According to the 1870 census, she was born in TN.

Listed with Rhoda is her son, Elijah W., a common laborer who was then 16 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Rhoda is her son, Benjamin W., a common laborer who was then 16 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Rhoda is her son, George W., who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1857. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Rhoda is her son, William S., who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1865. According to the 1870 census, he was born in TN.

(4) Rhoda HORTON is listed in a household headed by her son, Elijah HORTON, in the 1880 census of Civil District 5, Anderson County, TN.

Rhoda is listed in the 1880 census as a widowed tailor who was then 47 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1833. According to the 1880 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN.

(5) Rhoda HORTON is listed in a household headed by her son, Elija HORTON, in the 1900 census of Civil District 5, Anderson County, TN. [Note by compiler: The image of the 1900 census page on which this household is listed is barely legible. The information set forth below is taken largely from a transcription of that image.]

Rhoda is listed in the 1900 census as a widow who was born in March 1836 and was then 64 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in TN, and both of her parents were born in TN. According to the 1900 census, she had theretofore given birth to 6 children, 3 of whom were then living. 
FROST, Rhoda (I36733)
 
25241 (1) thePeerage.com:

Charles II Stuart, King of Great Britain was born on 29 May 1630 at St. James's Palace, St. James's, London, England. He was the son of Charles I Stuart, King of Great Britain and Henriette Marie de Bourbon, Princesse de France. He married Catarina Henriqueta de Bragança, Princeza de Portugal, daughter of João IV de Bragança, Rei de Portugal and Luiza Maria de Guzman, on 21 May 1662 at St. Thomas à Becket Church, Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. He was also reported to have been married on 3 May 1662 at Winchester, Hampshire, England. He died on 6 February 1685 at age 54 at Whitehall Palace, Whitehall, London, England, from a stroke. He was buried on 14 February 1685 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.

Charles II Stuart, King of Great Britain and Elizabeth Jones, Lady Kildare were associated. He was created 1st Duke of Rothesay [England] on 29 May 1630. He was created 1st Duke of Cornwall [England] on 29 May 1630. He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 21 May 1638. He and Elizabeth Killigrew were associated circa 1649. He and Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland were associated between 1659 and 1668. He gained the title of King Charles II of Great Britain on 8 May 1660. Charles II Stuart, King of Great Britain also went by the nick-name of 'Old Rowley'. Charles II Stuart, King of Great Britain also went by the nick-name of 'the Merry Monarch'. He was crowned King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith on 23 April 1661 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England. He and Catherine Pegge were associated. He and Lucy Walter were associated. He and Eleanor Gywnne were associated. He and Louise Ren??e de Penanco??t de K??rouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth were associated. He and Mary Davies were associated circa 1672. He and Jane Middleton were associated in 1678.

When his father's cause was lost in 1646 he went to the Isles of Scilly then Jersey and on to France. In 1650 he was crowned King of the Scots at Scone. He invaded England in 1651 and was beaten by Cromwell at the Battle of Worcester and after the battle hid in an oak tree. With difficulty he escaped to France. Returning to England in 1660 he was welcomed as King. Plague struck the country in 1665 killing over 60,000 in London alone and in the next year the Great Fire made 200,000 homeless. That was not all, the Dutch Fleet sailed up the Medway and England had to sue for peace. After the Great Fire, Sir Christopher Wren built a new and better London. Charles had St James Park re-created and built Chelsea Hospital for old soldiers. He supported the sciences, founding Greenwich Observatory and the Royal Society. Boyle Halley and Newton are illustrious names of his reign and Nell Gwynn will be remembered for other reasons. His Chief Minister was Clarendon who freed the Church of its Cromwellian past. Titus Oates raised the alarm of a Popish plot and many Catholics were executed. Charles himself was a Catholic, certainly just before his death and probably before. He had many mistresses and the future Duke of Monmouth was his illegitimate son. Of twenty-six dukes in England today, five are descendants on the wrong side of the blanket of Charles II. His neice was married to William of Orange, as a diplomatic measure. He brought much needed elegance to the land. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

(2) "Charles II," Encyclopædia Brittanica, 2010, © 2010 Encyclopædia Brittanica, Inc.:

Charles II, byname The Merry Monarch (b. May 29, 1630, London - d. Feb. 6, 1685, London), king of Great Britain and Ireland (1660-85), who was restored to the throne after years of exile during the Puritan Commonwealth. The years of his reign are known in English history as the Restoration period. His political adaptability and his knowledge of men enabled him to steer his country through the convolutions of the struggle between Anglicans, Catholics, and dissenters that marked much of his reign.

Birth and early years

Charles II, the eldest surviving son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria of France, was born at St. James's Palace, London. His early years were unremarkable, but before he was 20 his conventional education had been completely overshadowed by the harsh lessons of defeat in the Civil War against the Puritans and subsequent isolation and poverty. Thus Charles emerged into precocious maturity, cynical, self-indulgent, skilled in the sort of moral evasions that make life comfortable even in adversity.

But though the early years of tawdry dissipation have tarnished the romance of his adventures, not all his actions were discreditable. He tried to fight his father's battles in the west of England in 1645; he resisted the attempts of his mother and his sister Henrietta Anne to convert him to Catholicism and remained openly loyal to his Protestant faith. In 1648 he made strenuous efforts to save his father; and when, after Charles I's execution in 1649, he was proclaimed Charles II by the Scots in defiance of the English republic, he was prepared to go to Scotland and swallow the stringently anti-Catholic and anti-Anglican Presbyterian Covenant as the price for alliance. But the sacrifice of friends and principles was futile and left him deeply embittered. The Scottish army was routed by the English under Oliver Cromwell at Dunbar in September 1650, and in 1651 Charles's invasion of England ended in defeat at Worcester. The young king became a fugitive, hunted through England for 40 days but protected by a handful of his loyal subjects until he escaped to France in October 1651.

His safety was comfortless, however. He was destitute and friendless, unable to bring pressure against an increasingly powerful England. France and the Dutch United Provinces were closed to him by Cromwell's diplomacy and he turned to Spain, with whom he concluded a treaty in April 1656. He persuaded his brother James to relinquish his command in the French army and gave him some regiments of Anglo-Irish troops in Spanish service, but poverty doomed this nucleus of a royalist army to impotence. European princes took little interest in Charles and his cause, and his proffers of marriage were declined. Even Cromwell's death did little to improve his prospects. But George Monck, one of Cromwell's leading generals, realized that under Cromwell's successors the country was in danger of being torn apart and with his formidable army created the situation favourable to Charles's restoration in 1660.

Most Englishmen now favoured a return to a stable and legitimate monarchy, and, although more was known of Charles II's vices than his virtues, he had, under the steadying influence of Edward Hyde, his chief adviser, avoided any damaging compromise of his religion or constitutional principles. With Hyde's help, Charles issued in April 1660 his Declaration of Breda, expressing his personal desire for a general amnesty, liberty of conscience, an equitable settlement of land disputes, and full payment of arrears to the army. The actual terms were to be left to a free parliament, and on this provisional basis Charles was proclaimed king in May 1660. Landing at Dover on May 25, he reached a rejoicing London on his 30th birthday.

Restoration settlement

The unconditional nature of the settlement that took shape between 1660 and 1662 owed little to Charles's intervention and must have exceeded his expectations. He was bound by the concessions made by his father in 1640 and 1641, but the Parliament elected in 1661 was determined on an uncompromising Anglican and royalist settlement. The Militia Act of 1661 gave Charles unprecedented authority to maintain a standing army, and the Corporation Act of 1661 allowed him to purge the boroughs of dissident officials. Other legislation placed strict limits on the press and on public assembly, and the 1662 Act of Uniformity created controls of education. An exclusive body of Anglican clergy and a well-armed landed gentry were the principal beneficiaries of Charles II's restoration.

But within this narrow structure of upper-class loyalism there were irksome limitations on Charles's independence. His efforts to extend religious toleration to his Nonconformist and Roman Catholic subjects were sharply rebuffed in 1663, and throughout his reign the House of Commons was to thwart the more generous impulses of his religious policy. A more pervasive and damaging limitation was on his financial independence. Although the Parliament voted the king an estimated annual income of ??1,200,000, Charles had to wait many years before his revenues produced such a sum, and by then the damage of debt and discredit was irreparable. Charles was incapable of thrift; he found it painful to refuse petitioners. With the expensive disasters of the Anglo-Dutch War of 1665-67 the reputation of the restored king sank to its lowest level. His vigorous attempts to save London during the Great Fire of September 1666 could not make up for the negligence and maladministration that led to England's naval defeat in June 1667.

Foreign policy

Charles cleared himself by dismissing his old adviser, Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, and tried to assert himself through a more adventurous foreign policy. So far, his reign had made only modest contributions to England's commercial advancement. The Navigation Acts of 1660 and 1663, which had been prompted by the threat to British shipping of the rise of the Dutch carrying trade, were valuable extensions of Cromwellian policies, and the capture of New York in 1664 was one of his few gains from the Dutch. But although marriage to Princess Catherine of Braganza of Portugal in 1662 brought him the possession of Tangier and Bombay, they were of less strategic value than Dunkirk, which he sold to Louis XIV in 1662. Charles was, however, prepared to sacrifice much for the alliance of his young cousin. Through his sister Henrietta Anne, Duchess of Orl??ans, he had direct contact with the French court, and it was through her that he negotiated the startling reversal of the Protestant Triple Alliance (England, the Dutch United Provinces, Sweden) of 1668. By the terms of the so-called Secret Treaty of Dover of May 1670, not only did England and France join in an offensive alliance against the Dutch but Charles promised to announce his conversion to Roman Catholicism. If this provoked trouble from his subjects he was assured of French military and financial support. Charles saw to it that the conversion clause of the treaty was not made public.

This clause, which was the most controversial act of Charles II's reign, can be explained as a shortsighted bid for Louis XIV's confidence. In this, however, it failed. Louis neither welcomed Charles's intentions nor believed in them and, in the event, it was only upon his deathbed that Charles was received into the Roman Catholic church. But Charles had now fatally compromised himself. Although he subsequently attempted to pursue policies independent of Louis, he remained bound to him by inclination as well as by the fear of blackmail. More seriously, he had lost the confidence of his subjects, who deplored the French alliance and distrusted the whole tendency of Charles's policies.

Other circumstances deepened Englishmen's discontent with their king. By the 1670s, the miscarriages of the queen had reduced hopes that Charles would have a legitimate heir, and in 1673 the second marriage of his brother James, Duke of York, to Mary of Modena, increased the possibility of the Catholic line of succession, for James's conversion to the Roman church was well known. But it was for his autocratic character as much as for his religion that James was feared as his brother was not, and it was on his brother's behalf that Charles eventually had to face the severest political storm of his reign.

The Popish Plot of 1678 was an elaborate tissue of fictions built around a skeleton of even stranger truths. The allegations of Titus Oates, a former Anglican cleric who had been expelled from a Jesuit seminary, that Roman Catholics planned to murder Charles to make James king, seemed to be confirmed by scraps of evidence of which Charles was justifiably skeptical. But Charles was obliged to bow before the gusts of national hysteria that sought to bar his brother from the line of succession. Between 1679 and 1681 Charles very nearly lost control of his government. Deprived of his chief minister, the Earl of Danby, who had been compromised by his negotiations with France, the king had to allow the Earl of Shaftesbury and his Whig supporters, who upheld the power of the Parliament - men whom he detested - to occupy positions of power in central and local government. Three general elections produced three equally unmanageable parliaments; and although Charles publicly denied the legitimacy of his first son, the Protestant Duke of Monmouth, he had to send his Catholic brother James out of the country and offer a plan of limitations that would bind James if he came to the throne. The plan proved to be unacceptable both to the Whigs and to James, and, when Charles fell seriously ill in the summer of 1679, there was real danger of civil conflict.

But Charles kept his nerve. He defended his queen against slanders, dismissed the intractable parliaments, and recovered control of his government. His subjects' dread of republican anarchy proved stronger than their suspicion of James, and from March 1681, when he dissolved his last Parliament, Charles enjoyed a nationwide surge of loyalty almost as fervent as that of 1660. He had made yet another secret treaty with France and in addition to a French subsidy could now count upon a healthy public revenue. Reforms at the Treasury, which he had inaugurated in 1667, provided the crown with a firm basis of administrative control that was among Charles II's most valuable legacies to English government.

As a result of these actions, Charles, who died in February 1685 at Whitehall in London, was able to end his reign in the kind of tranquil prosperity he had always sought.

Assessment

Believing that God would not "make a man miserable only for taking a little pleasure out of the way," he had made quite sure of his own share and left at least 14 illegitimate offspring, of whom only James, Duke of Monmouth, played any part in English politics. Mistresses like Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, and Louise de K??roualle, Duchess of Portsmouth, were always costly and often troublesome, but Charles probably paid a smaller price for his amours than for his laziness. He was tall and active and loved riding and sailing but, although robust enough to outsit his advisers at the Council board, he hated routine and prolonged application. This failing undermined the effectiveness of his government and led to his dependence on France. But the relaxed tolerance he brought to religious matters in the end may have contributed more to the stability of his reign than was lost by his shifty insincerity.

Charles fully shared the interests of the skeptical, materialist century that saw the foundation of the Royal Society under his charter, and he did something to foster technological improvements in navigation and ship design. The sincerity of his interest in England's naval advancement is held by some historians to be the most important of his redeeming features, although, like his reputation for wit and high intelligence, it may not stand up to close examination. Any verdict on Charles is therefore controversial. A contemporary wrote of him that "he had as good a claim to a kind interpretation as most men," and on this basis it may be agreed that his image as a man remains more attractive than his reputation as a king.

Henry Godfrey Roseveare 
STUART, King Charles II (I18439)
 
25242 (1) There are many variations of the BALCOMB surname, including BALCOLME, BALCOM, BALCOMB, BALCOMBE, BALCOME, BALKHAM, BAUCOM, BAUCOMB, BAUCOMBE, BAULCOM, BAULCOMB, BAULCOMBE, BAULKHAM, BAWCOM, BAWCOMBE and BAWCOME. BALCOMB, Ann (I35905)
 
25243 (1) There are substantial questions about the accuracy of at least some of the information about John FRENCH contained in French, Mansfield Joseph, Ancestors and Descendants of Samuel French, the Joiner, of Stratford, Connecticut, Ann Arbor, MI: Edwards Brothers, Inc., 1940, p. 31.

Philip FRENCH, Jr., who is described in the will of Philip FRENCH, Sr. as the testator's eldest son, is believed by the compiler to have been born about 1667; therefore, his younger brother John FRENCH would have been born after 1667.

The compiler knows of no evidence that John FRENCH was the son of a woman named Mary or that he was baptized in St John the Baptist Church, Saxmundham, County Suffolk, England on March 13, 1659.

The compiler has not found any record of John FRENCH in the "old Dutch Church records in New York City," including any record of the intention of John FRENCH and Mary WHITE "to marry under date of October 21, 1694;" however, the compiler has found a record of a marriage license of John FRENCH and Mary WHITE, which was recorded on October 21, 1694 in the old books of record in the Surrogate's office in New York City. There is a record of the marriage of a John FRENCH and Mary WHITE in Shrewsbury, NJ on August 31, 1694, but the compiler does not know why the parties would have gotten a marriage license in New York City if they had previously been married in NJ. Moreover, the compiler is not certain that the John FRENCH who was married to Mary WHITE was the same person as our John FRENCH.

(2) The questions about the accuracy of information on p. 31 of Mansfield Joseph French's book are based upon the research of Jeanette S. French .

(3) The information from p. 31 of Mansfield Joseph French's book and is presented here so that its accuracy can be questioned:

Capt. John French, son of Philip and Mary French of Kelshall, recently Kelsale, County Suffolk, England, and brother of Philip French, junior, of New York, was baptized March 13, 1659, in St John the Baptist Church, Saxmundham, County Suffolk, England. Before he was thirty years of age he was a captain of a ship and came from London to New York. After several trips he and his brother, Philip, Jr., settled in New York as headquarters for their commercial enterprises. "Old Times in Old Monmouth, New Jersey," page 252, gives "A record of Mr. John French's marriage: Att Tinton Manor in Shrewsbury, in the Province of New Jersey, the last day of August, 1694, John French of New York and Mary White of the same Town, came before me, and did take each other in marriage before several witnesses until death part. Peter Tilton, East New Jersey." Mary was the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth White of New York. The old Dutch Church records in New York City give their intention to marry under date of October 21, 1694, but the record was copied from a printed transcript and the month may have been August in the original record.

Capt. John French lived in the lower part of the Broad Way, near the Bowling Green, and not far from the new home of his brother, Philip, on Pearl St., near the present site of the celebrated Fraunces Tavern. Philip, in his will dated May 29 1706, probated June 3, 1717, makes a bequest to the children of his brother, John French, but does not give their names and the probate records do not disclose them. The will of Phillip French of Kelshall , County Suffolk, England, dated Feb. 12, 1697, proved Feb. 4, 1704 by his son, Philip, Jr. of New York, gives to his son, John, "one thousand pounds, to be paid to him in New York in America." A deed of sale of the Broadway residence in New York is dated Nov. 8, 1715. Capt. John may have removed with his family to England or he may have established a home in New Jersey or eastern Pennsylvania. The names of his children have not been determined.

(4) http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ny/newyork/census/1703/1703-nyc.t xt:

1703 Census of New York City, NY
Submitted by P.D.Smith on August 23, 1998
Copyright 1998 © by P.D.Smith.

District: New York City; West Ward
Page# 403

Masters of Familys: John French
Males 16-60: 1
Females: 2
Male children: 0
Female children: 3
Male Negros: 0
Female Negros: 0
Male Negro children: 0
Female Negro children: 0
All above 60: 0 
FRENCH, Capt. John (I10904)
 
25244 (1) There can be no assurance that the following christening record relates to the Anne HUTCHINSON who married Hugh RHODHAM in Stanhope, Durham, England.

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975:

Name: Ann Hutchison
Gender: Female
Christening Date: 03 Jan 1720
Christening Place: Allendale, Northumberland, England
Father's Name: Chrispr. Hutchison

[Note by compiler: Allendale, Northumberland, England is about 15 miles from Stanhope, Durham, England, where Anne HUTCHINSON married Hugh RHODHAM.] 
HUTCHINSON, Anne (I41259)
 
25245 (1) There is a conflict among sources as to whether Henry Downing PREDDY was born in Columbus, Muscogee County, GA or Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL.

(2) U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005:

Name: Henry Downing Preddy
County: Jefferson
State: Texas
Birthplace: [Columbus,] Georgia, United States of America
Birth Date: 16 Jun 1887
Race: Caucasian (White)
Draft Board: 2
Age: 28
Occupation: Laundry truck driver
Nearest Relative: Not specified
Height/Build: Tall/Slender
Color of Eyes/Hair: Gray/Brown
Signature: Henry Downing Preddy

(3) Texas Death Index, 1903-2000 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006:

Name: Henry D Preddy
Death Date: 14 Dec 1961
Death County: Jefferson
Certificate: 72388

(4) Texas, Death Certificates, 1903-1982 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013:

Name: Henry D Preddy
Birth Date: 16 Jun 1886
Birth Place: Birmingham, Alabama
Gender: Male
Race: White
Residence: Port Arthur, Jefferson, Texas
Father: John Preddy
Mother: Bell Dudley
Age at Death: 75
Death Date: 14 Dec 1961
Death Place: Port Arthur, Jefferson, Texas, USA

(5) www.findagrave.com:

Henry Downing Preddy
Birth: Jun. 16, 1886, Georgia, USA
Death: Dec. 14, 1961, Jefferson County, Texas, USA

Family links: Parents: John David Preddy (1860 - ____), Belle Irene Dudley Preddy (1869 - 1942); Siblings: Alice Irene Preddy Jones (1880 - 1943), Albert Greenfield Preddy (1882 - 1972), Henry Downing Preddy (1886 - 1961), Johnye Pauline Preddy Goodrum (1891 - 1988), Burnice Lambert Preddy (1899 - 1919), Frederick B Preddy (1904 - 1982)

Burial: Greenlawn Memorial Park, Groves, Jefferson County, Texas, USA

Maintained by: Kerry G
Originally Created by: W & L
Record added: Nov 02, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 31066334 
PREDDY, Henry Downing (I41890)
 
25246 (1) There is a conflict among sources as to whether Susannah's maiden name was ROBINSON.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Suzanne Robinson Parke
Birth: 1688
Death: 1731, Hopewell, Mercer County, New Jersey, USA

Married ca 1705 Roger Parke Jr.

9 Children

Family links: Spouse: Roger Parke (1684 - 1755); Children: William Parke (1711 - 1764), Kesiah Parke Larison (1713 - 1788)

Burial: Parke-Larison Cemetery (Defunct), Hopewell, Mercer County, New Jersey, USA

Created by: Carole Conrad
Record added: May 04, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 129192112 
ROBINSON[?], Susannah (I42621)
 
25247 (1) There is some confusion as to when Andrew BUCHANAN was born and when he died. According to one source, Andrew died on 19 January 1759 at the age of 43; therefore, according to this source, he was born in about 1716. According to another source, Andrew died on 19 January 1748 at the age of 43; therefore, according to this source, he was born in about 1705.

(2) A Brief History of the Families in Black's Graveyard Adams County, Pennsylvania, Part III :

From the Gettysburg Times Gettysburg, Pennsylvania of Saturday, August 8, 1959

A Bit Of History About Early Settlers

By B. F. M. MacPHERSON

The historical and genealogical study of Black's graveyard (Upper Marsh Creek Presbyterian), located in Cumberland Township, this County, just off the Mummasburg Road, is continued at this time.

As stated before in this series on Black's graveyard, beginning after the congregation moved to its first location in Gettysburg, many families began removing their dead other burial grounds. This movement, gained impetus when the Evergreen Cemetery was opened in 1854. Among these were members of the Buchanan and Smith families, who are related to the Morrison's, and were originally buried with them (tradition states that were buried together) in Black's graveyard. Robert, the son of Walter and Elizabeth (Buchanan) Smith, moved the bones and monument of his ancestors from the old, neglected burial ground into the Evergreen Cemetery (area A.). At one time this plot was enclosed by an old hand wrought iron fence but in recent years this has disappeared. Three of the stones, those marking the graves of the Buchanan's, are the large, flat, black slate stones, covering an entire graves, with the Buchanan coat-of-arms cut thereon.

Inscriptions on stones

The inscriptions from the Smith - Buchanan's stones, moved from Black's graveyard to the Evergreen Cemetery, are as follows:

1. (Coat-of-arms) "Here lys ye Body of Jean/Buchanan who Departed This Life March ye 28, 1760, Aged 50 years / Here Lies The Body of John/Buchanan who Departed This Life March The 3, 1773 Aged 68 Years."

2. (Coat-of-arms) "Here Lys The / body of Robert Buchanan/ Who departed This Life / the 28th of Sept. In The / Year of Our Lord 1748 / Aged 51 Years: Also Here Lys the body of James / Buchanan who Departed This Life the 21st of Novr in the / Year of Our Lord 1751 Aged / 20 years."

3. (Coat-of-Arms) "Here Lys the Body of / Andrew Buchanan/ who Departed This Life / January the 19th, 1759 / Aged 43 Years / In Memory of Walter Buchanan / who Departed this Life in the / Year 1780 / And of Mary Roney, wife of Walter Buchanan / Elizabeth Smith / Daughter of Walter and Mary Roney Buchanan / Aged 74 years."

4. (Upright black slate stone) "in memory of/Robert Smith/who departed this life/August 19, 1769 in the 64th year of his age/. Elizabeth, daughter of Walter and Mary you can/wife of Robert Smith died/March 1812 aged 74 years/parents of Walter Smith."

5. "Walter Smith/departed this life/June 8, 1838/in the 75th year of his age./Elizabeth/consort of Walter Smith/the part of this life/5 March 1837/in the 68th year of her age."

Stone is broken

6. "Jane Robinson/daughter of Walter and Elizabeth Smith/born October 21, 1803/died April 23, 1826/the stones originally at Jane's grave was broken by rebel shot in the battle of Gettysburg/July 1863, in which the Union army won / the great victory over the southern rebels."

7. "In memory/Walter Addison/son of Walter/and Elizabeth Smith/the departed this life/April 29, 1850/aged 19 years."

8. "In memory of/Nancy Smith/daughter/Walter and Elizabeth Smith/who departed this life/November 28, 1831/aged 25 years/and eight months."

9. "In/memory/Harriet Smith/daughter/Walter and Elizabeth Smith/the died 21st of June 1836/in the 35th year of her age."

(3) A Brief History of the Families in Black's Graveyard Adams County, Pennsylvania, Part IV :

From the Gettysburg Times Gettysburg, Pennsylvania of Saturday, August 15, 1959

A Bit Of History About Early Settlers

By B. F. M. MacPHERSON

According to a fairly reliable family tradition there were some six or seven brothers in the Buchanan family who came to America from County Tyrone, Ireland between 1728 and 1730. Four of these brothers are buried in the Evergreen Cemetery having been removed from Black's Braveyard some years ago. They are as follows: -

[1] Robert Buchanan died 1748 - aged 51 years.

[2] Walter Buchanan - died 1780.

[3] John Buchanan - died 1773 - aged 68 years.

[4] Andrew Buchanan - died 1759 - aged 43 years. . . .

Andrew Buchanan, the brother of Robert Buchanan (died 1748), died January 19, 1759, aged 43 years, was originally buried in the family plot in Black's Braveyard but was later moved with other members of his family to the Evergreen Cemetery. He (Andrew) also died intestate. Letters of administration were granted to Margaret Buchanan, his wife, and William Buchanan. Orphans Court proceedings in 1760 and court proceedings in 1771 mention: -

1. Widow - Margaret Buchanan.

2. Son - William Buchanan (apparently the eldest son).

3. Son - John Buchanan.

4. Daughter - Catherine Buchanan intermarried with Moses Boyd.

5. Daughter - Jane Buchanan intermarried with _____ Gilkinson.

6. Daughter - Sarah Buchanan (unmarried).

7. Daughter - Mary Buchanan (unmarried).

Court names guardians

Guardians appointed by the court to administer the affairs of the minor children of Andrew McPherson and Samuel Edie.

In 1771 the court compelled William Buchanan, the eldest son to relinquish the Administratorship of Andrew Buchanan's estate, and gives the same to his brother, John Buchanan, who takes over the division of the estate with heirs.

The "lands" of Andrew Buchanan consisted of some three hundred acres in Cumberland Township, York (now Adams) County, adjoining the lands of Joseph Morrison, David Porter, John Armstrong, David Ramsey, John Buchanan and Robert McPherson, Esq. When Andrew Buchanan died in 1759 several of his children were unmarried. The will of Jenet Morrison lists the children of Andrew Buchanan with their married names. Jenet Morrison died in 1774 and her will is one file at the York County, Pennsylvania,
Courthouse.

Jenet Morrison, who lived in Cumberland Township, York space (now Adams) County, was apparently, a "maiden lady" and the children of Andrew Buchanan were her cousins. The synopsis of Jenet Morrison's will follows: -

1. "To my cousin, Catherine Boyd - clothing." (Daughter of Andrew Buchanan).

2. "To my cousin, Jean Gilkinson - clothing." Space (daughter of Andrew Buchanan).

Other requests [bequests]

3. "To my cousin, Sarah Buchanan, my pewter tea set." (Daughter of Andrew Buchanan).

4. "To my cousin, very Buchanan, my Bible." (Daughter of Andrew Buchanan).

5. "The cow, which is now in the hands of Robert Morrison, to pay my funeral expenses."

6. "The land given to me by my father before his decease, fifty acres lying along the west side of the lands of John Morrison, his line beginning at David Porter's line and ends alongside of John Morrison's line until he comes to Alexander Ramsey's place - said land to be sold and the proceeds divided between: - Archibald Morrison Junior, Joseph Morrison Junior, Robert Morrison, William Buchanan, and John Buchanan."

(4) www.findagrave.com:

Andrew Buchanan
Birth: 1704, Ireland
Death: Jan. 8, 1748, Pennsylvania, USA . . .

Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: Section A

Maintained by: Pam R.
Originally Created by: Amy Hunt
Record added: Nov 13, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 61563850 
BUCHANAN, Andrew (I40923)
 
25248 (1) There is some confusion as to when Clarence R. GREEN was born and died, and where he was buried. For example, according to Find A Grave Memorial #103397667, he was born in 1866, died in 1935, and is buried in Pisgah Cemetery, Perry, Taylor County, FL. On the other hand, according to Find A Grave Memorial #81697177, he was born in September 1868, died on November 27, 1930, and is buried in Poor Spot Cemetery, Taylor County, FL.

(2) A household headed by Clarence GREEN is listed in the 1900 census of Macedonia Precinct 11, Madison County, FL. The actual enumeration date of the 1900 census was June 13, 1900.

Clarence is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer who was born in September 1868 and was then 31 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in GA. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married 12 years.

Listed with Clarence is his wife, Levicy, who was born in March 1870 and was then 30 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in FL, and both of her parents were born in FL. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married 12 years and had theretofore given birth to 5 children, 2 of whom were then living.

Also listed with Clarence is his daughter, Lula, who was born in November 1891 and was then 8 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in FL, and both of her parents were born in FL.

Also listed with Clarence is his Owen, who was born in May 1898 and was then 2 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in FL.

(3) A household headed by Clarence GREEN is listed in the 1910 census of Perry, Taylor County, FL.

Clarence is listed in the 1910 census as a farmer who was then 45 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1865. According to the 1910 census, he was born in FL, his father was born in GA, and his mother was born in FL. According to the 1910 census, he had then been married 6 years to his then current wife (who was his second wife).

Listed with Clarence is his wife, Aline, who was then 27 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1883. According to the 1910 census, she was born in FL, and both of her parents were born in FL. According to the 1910 census, she had then been married 6 years to her then current husband (who was her first husband) and had theretofore given birth to 2 children, neither of whom was then living.

Also listed with Clarence is his daughter, Lula L., who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1892. According to the 1910 census, she was born in FL, and both of her parents were born in FL.

Also listed with Clarence is his son, James O., who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1899. According to the 1910 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in FL.

Also listed with Clarence is his son, Coy R., who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1902. According to the 1910 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in FL.

(4) A household headed by Clarence R. GREEN is listed in the 1920 census of Perry, Taylor County, FL.

Clarence is listed in the 1920 census as a farmer who was then 53 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1867. According to the 1920 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in GA.

Listed with Clarence is his wife, Aline, who was then 39 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1881. According to the 1920 census, she was born in FL, her father was born in NC, and her mother was born in FL.

Also listed with Clarence is his son, Oswell L. [?], who was then 4 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1916. According to the 1920 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in GA.

(5) A household headed by Clarence GREENE is listed in the 1930 census of Perry, Taylor County, FL.

Clarence is listed in the 1930 census as a farmer who was then 63 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1867. According to the 1930 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in FL. According to the 1930 census, he was 33 years of age at his first marriage.

Listed with Clarence is his wife, Allene, who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1881. According to the 1930 census, she was born in FL, and both of her parents were born in FL. According to the 1930 census, she was 16 years of age at her first marriage.

Also listed with Clarence is his son, Oswell, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1917. According to the 1930 census, he was born in FL, and both of his parents were born in FL.

(6) Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004:

Name: C R Green
Gender: Male
Race: White
Death Date: 1930
Death Place: Taylor, Florida, United States

(7) U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015:

Name: Clarence R Green
Gender: Male
Spouse: Alline McDaniel
Child: Oswald Eugene Green

(8) www.findagrave.com:

Clarence R. Green
Birth: Sep., 1868, Taylor County, Florida, USA
Death: Nov. 27, 1930, Taylor County, Florida, USA

Son J G Green and Unknown Mixon.
Information from Florida Death Certificate #18118

Burial: Poor Spot Cemetery, Taylor County, Florida, USA

Created by: dianne sudol
Record added: Dec 08, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 81697177

(9) www.findagrave.com:

Clarence R. Green
Birth: 1866, Florida, USA
Death: 1935, Florida, USA

Married: Levicy Cruce June 14, 1888

Family links: Parents: James Gideon Green (1843 - 1916), Arabella Mixon Green (1846 - 1930); Children: James Owen Green (1898 - 1973), Coy R. Green (1912 - 2000); Siblings: Clarence R. Green (1866 - 1935), James Franklin Green (1873 - 1900), Celia R Brannen (1874 - 1948), May Lula Green (1877 - 1880), Laura Green Barber (1882 - 1948), Charlie Green (1884 - 1906)

Burial: Pisgah Cemetery, Perry, Taylor County, Florida, USA

Created by: V.A. McKeehan
Record added: Jan 10, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 103397667 
GREEN, Clarence R. (I42240)
 
25249 (1) There is some confusion as to where Eugene L. SWIFT, Sr. was born. "New York" is inscribed on his tombstone, and according to the 1900 census, he was born in NY. However, in the 1910, 1920 and 1930 censuses, he is listed as having been born in PA, and in a 1933 passenger list, he is shown to have been born in Chester, PA.

(2) Eugene L. SWIFT is listed in the 1900 census of U.S. Military and Naval Forces in Aparri, Philippine Islands.

Eugene L. is listed in the 1900 census as a Major who was born in June 1863 and was then 36 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in NY, his father was born in MA, and his mother was born in SC. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married 5 years.

Listed with Eugene L. is his wife, Mary S., who was born in September 1870 and was then 29 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in CA, her father was born in NY, and her mother was born in MA. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married 5 years and had theretofore given birth to 1 child, who was then living.

Also listed with Eugene L. is his son, Eugene L., Jr., who was born in November 1898 and was then 1 year old. According to the 1900 census, he was born in NY, his father was born in NY, and his mother was born in CA.

(3) A household headed by Eugene L. SWIFT is listed in the 1910 census of Los Angeles Assembly District 71, Los Angeles County, CA.

Eugene L. is listed in the 1910 census as a physician who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1864. According to the 1910 census, he was born in PA, his father was born in MA, and his mother was born in SC. According to the 1910 census, he had then been married to his second wife 14 years.

Listed with Eugene L. is his wife, Mary W., who was then 39 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1871. According to the 1910 census, she was born in CA, her father was born in NY, and her mother was born in MA. According to the 1910 census, she had then been married to her first husband 14 years and had theretofore given birth to 2 children, both of whom were then living.

Also listed with Eugene L. is his son, Eugene L., Jr., who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1899. According to the 1910 census, he was born in NY, his father was born in PA, and his mother was born in CA.

Also listed with Eugene L. is his daughter, Sarah W., who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1908. According to the 1910 census, she was born in CA, her father was born in PA, and her mother was born in CA.

Also listed with Eugene L. is an apparently unrelated servant.

(4) A household headed by Eugene L. SWIFT is listed in the 1920 census of San Francisco Assembly District 31, San Francisco County, CA.

Eugene L. is listed in the 1920 census as an Army officer who was then 56 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1864. According to the 1920 census, he was born in PA, his father was born in MA, and his mother was born in SC.

Listed with Eugene L. is his wife, Harriet, who was then 37 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1883. According to the 1920 census, she was born in CA, her father was born in LA, and her mother was born in CA.

Also listed with Eugene is his [step-]son, Cecil, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1903. According to the 1920 census, he was born in AZ, his father was born in PA, and his mother was born in CA.

Also listed with Eugene is his [step-]son, George, who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1909. According to the 1920 census, he was born in AZ, his father was born in PA, and his mother was born in CA.

(5) A household headed by Eugene L. SWIFT is listed in the 1930 census of Springfield, Sangamon County, IL.

Eugene L. is listed in the 1930 census as an Army officer who was then 66 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1864. According to the 1930 census, he was born in PA, his father was born in MA, and his mother was born in SC. According to the 1930 census, he was 44 years of age at his first marriage.

Listed with Eugene L. is his wife, Harriett D., who was then 47 years of age; therefore, according to the 1830 census, she was born in about 1883. According to the 1930 census, she was born in CA, her father was born in MO, and her mother was born in CA. According to the 1930 census, she was 27 years of age at his first marriage.

(6) Baltimore Passenger Lists, 1820-1948 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006:

Name: Eugene L Swift
Arrival Date: Nov 1933
Age: 70 Years 0 Months years
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1863
Gender: Male
Port of Departure: Le Havre, France
Ship Name: Havre
Port of Arrival: Baltimore, Maryland
Microfilm Roll Number: 130
Page: 213

[Note by compiler: In the passenger list described in this source, Eugene L. SWIFT is shown to have been born on 21 June 1863 in Chester, PA.]

(7) U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca. 1775-2006 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006:

Name: Eugene L Swift
Service Info.: MAJOR US ARMY SPANISH AMERICAN WAR
Death Date: 18 Mar 1935
Cemetery: San Francisco National Cemetery
Cemetery Address: 1 Lincoln Blvd Presidio of San Francisco San Francisco, CA 94129
Buried At: Section Osa Row 98 Site 7

(8) www.findagrave.com:

Eugene L Swift
Birth: Unknown
Death: Mar. 18, 1935

Family links: Spouse: Harriet DeVilbiss Swift (1882 - 1973)

Burial: San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, USA
Plot: OSA, 7/98

Imported from: US Veteran's Affairs
Record added: Mar 04, 2000
Find A Grave Memorial# 3543595 
SWIFT, Maj. Eugene L. Sr. (I26316)
 
25250 (1) There is some confusion as to whether this person's name was Emmett Robert FROST or Robert Emmett FROST.

(2) A household headed by Emment FROST is listed in the 1900 census of Yest Township, Henry County, KY.

Emment is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer who was born in June 1871 and was then 29 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married 10 years.

Listed with Emment is his wife, Maggie M., who was born in May 1874 and was then 26 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married 10 years and had theretofore given birth to 4 children, all of whom were then living.

Also listed with Emment is his daughter, Madoline , who was born in October 1890 and was then 9 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emment is his son, Normon, who was born in November 1892 and was then 7 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emment is his son, Raymond, who was born in February 1895 and was then 5 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emment is his son, Hermon, who was born in August 1899 and was then 10 months old. According to the 1900 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

(3) A household headed by Emmet FROST is listed in the 1910 census of South Monterey Precinct, Owen County, KY.

Emmet is listed as a farmer who was then 39 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1871. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY. According to the 1910 census, he had then been married 19 years.

Also listed with Emmet is his wife, Maggie, who was then 38 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, she was born in about 1872. According to the 1910 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY. According to the 1910 census, she had then been married 19 years and had theretofore given birth to 10 children, 9 of whom were then living.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Norman, a farm laborer who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1893. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Raymond, a farm laborer who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1895. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Herman, who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1899. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, William, who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1901. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Austin, who was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1903. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Emmet N., who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1904. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Julius, who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1907. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet is his son, Howard, who was then 10 months old; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1909. According to the 1910 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

(4) A household headed by Emmet Robt. FROST is listed in the 1920 census of Lockport, Henry County, KY.

Emmet Robt. is listed in the 1920 census as a farmer who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1871. According to the 1920 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Listed with Emmet Robt. is his wife, Maggie May, who was then 48 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1872. According to the 1920 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet Robt. is his son, Emmet Nelson, a laborer who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1905. According to the 1920 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet Robt. is his son, Jubur Thomas, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1908. According to the 1920 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet Robt. is his son, Howard Bruce, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1910. According to the 1920 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmet Robt. is his daughter, Josephine, who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1912. According to the 1920 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY.

(5) A household headed by Emmett FROST is listed in the 1930 census of the 3rd Magisterial District, Mercer County, KY.

Emmett is listed in the 1930 census as a laborer who was then 59 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1871. According to the 1930 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY. According to the 1930 census, he was 20 years of age at his first marriage.

Listed with Emmett is his wife, Maggie, who was then 58 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1872. According to the 1930 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY. According to the 1930 census, she was 19 years of age at her first marriage.

Also listed with Emmett is his son, Thomas, a student who was then 22 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1908. According to the 1930 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmett is his son, Howard, a farm laborer who was then 19 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1911. According to the 1930 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmett is his daughter, Josephine, who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1912. According to the 1930 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY.

Also listed with Emmett is an apparently unrelated boarder.

(6) A household headed by R. Emmet FROST is listed in the 1940 census of Owen County, KY.

R. Emmet is listed in the 1940 census as a person who was then 69 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1871. According to the 1940 census, he was born in KY. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was in Mercer County, KY.

Listed with R. Emmet is his wife, Maggie M., who was then 68 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, she was born in about 1872. According to the 1940 census, she was born in KY. According to the 1940 census, her residence as of April 1, 1935 was in Mercer County, KY.

Also listed with R. Emmet is his son, Norman P., who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1894. According to the 1940 census, he was born in KY. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was in Mercer County, KY. [His middle initial is listed as D. in the index to the 1940 census.]

(7) Indiana, Death Certificates, 1899-2011 [database online], Lehi, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015:

Name: Robert Emmett Frost
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 93
Marital Status: Widowed
Birth Date: 2 Jan 1871
Birth Place: Kentucky
Death Date: 29 Nov 1964
Death Place: Marion, Grant, Indiana, USA
Father: Julius Frost
Mother: Mary Ellen Frost

(8) www.findagrave.com:

Emmett Robert Frost
Birth: 1871
Death: 1964

Family links: Spouse: Maggie Mae Eddings Frost (1872 - 1953); Children: Raymond Dennis Frost (1896 - 1986), Emmett Nelson Frost (1904 - 1950), Howard Bruce Frost (1909 - 1989)

Burial: Dutch Tract Cemetery, North Pleasureville, Henry County, Kentucky, USA

Created by: Quietude
Record added: May 31, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 91100097
 
FROST, Emmett Robert (I33640)
 

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