First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Notes


Matches 25,201 to 25,250 of 26,209

      «Prev «1 ... 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 ... 525» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
25201 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 153:

Mary [LOMAX], bapt. 14 Aug. 1625. 
LOMAX, Mary (I39918)
 
25202 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 153:

Timothy [LOMAX], bapt. 23 May 1620, apprenticed May 1635 to Thomas Cleborne and then to Lorance Carr, m. 18 Aug. 1656, Elizabeth Carr, his master's widow. A member of the Merchant Adventurer's Company, he was dead prior to 30 May 1666, when his widow petitioned the Company for relief. She was mentioned in the will of Susanna Bonner in 1682. Issue included a son Ralph, bapt. 11 Nov. 1657, bur. 20 Dec. 1658.

ii. Margaret, bapt. 20 Oct. 1622, bur. 1 Apr. 1625.

iii. Mary, bapt. 14 Aug. 1625. 
LOMAX, Timothy (I39916)
 
25203 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

(Rev.) John [LOMAX], bapt. 16 July 1635 (twin), sizar in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, 27 April 1650, B.A . (1653), M.A. (1657). He was a Nonconformist minister. He died 25 May 1693 at North Shields (Northumberland). By his wife Catherine (d. Jan. 1695/6) he had issue including sons John and Francis and daughters Susanna Wright and Catherine. 
LOMAX, Rev. John (I39922)
 
25204 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Edward [LOMAX], bapt. 16 July 1638, bur. 27 Sept. 1638. 
LOMAX, Edward (I39924)
 
25205 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Henry [LOMAX], bapt. 4 Oct. 1642, bur. 7 Oct. 1642. 
LOMAX, Henry (I39927)
 
25206 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Jane [LOMAX], bapt. 11 Nov. 1627, d. unm. prior to 6 June 1678 when her mother administered her estate. 
LOMAX, Jane (I39919)
 
25207 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Margaret [LOMAX], bapt. 23 Dec. 1632, m. 17 Oct. 1654 to John Thomas, sailmaker. 
LOMAX, Margaret (I39921)
 
25208 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Moses [LOMAX], bapt. 2 Feb. 1639/40. 
LOMAX, Moses (I39925)
 
25209 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Ralph [LOMAX], bapt. 16 July 1635 (twin), apprenticed first to his eldest brother and then to his stepfather Thomas Bonner. He was a member of the Company and died prior to Jan. 1661/2, when his mother administered his estate. 
LOMAX, Ralph Jr. (I39923)
 
25210 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Susan [LOMAX], bapt. 6 June 1641. 
LOMAX, Susan (I39926)
 
25211 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 154:

Thomas [LOMAX], bapt. 24 June 1630, apprenticed to Robert Lawson 29 May 1646 and the following year to Robert Johnson. He "departed out of his master's service" and by the end of 1657, if not before, he was in Maryland, where he gave a deposition "aged about 27 years" in the Provincial Court (Estate of Slingsby, Md. Prov. Ct. Rec., Lib. B-3, f. 395, 22 Jan. 1657/8; Arch, of Md., 41:28). He served as Clerk of the Charles County court during the rebellion of Josias Fendall in 1660. Among his many land transactions should be noted a conveyance to "his beloved brother" Claiborne Lomax of 600 acres in Charles County (Charles Co. Court & Land Rec., Lib. G, f. 3, 9 Jan. 1676/7). So far as the records show he was never married. He died a resident of St. Marys County in 1680 and his brother was his administrator (Md. Inventories & Acc'ts, Lib. 7 - B , f. 179, 25 Feb. 1680/1, inventory by Justinian Gerard and John Goldsmith; Charles Co. Md. Court & Land Rec., Lib. I, f. 305, 13 June 1682, recovery of attorney's fees for the estate). 
LOMAX, Thomas (I39920)
 
25212 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), pp. 153-156:

Recent research activities at the Hall of Records in Annapolis and among the collections of the Genealogical Society in Salt Lake City have brought to the light evidence of the birthplace and parentage of the brothers Thomas and Cleborne (Claiborne) Lomax, 17th century settlers in Charles County, Maryland, who at different times served as Clerk of the county court and whose names appear in the court and land records of the period with considerable frequency. Of particular value in providing proof was a transcript of the registers of All Saints Church in the parish of Allhallowes, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (Northumberland) filmed by the Genealogical Society and an article by Maberly Phillips, whose wife was a Lomax descendant ("John Lomax Ejected from Wooler, Northumberland, in 1662, with Some Account of His family," Archaeologia Aeliana, 3rd ser. , 2 [1906], 33-61, hereinafter "Phillips''), though neither source made any reference to American connections or descendants. Specific dates of baptism, marriage or burial, except where otherwise attributed, have been taken from this transcript, while other information concerning the English family of Lomax is derived from Phillips, who reprints in an appendix several documents pertaining to the family.

Ralph Lomax (Lumax), vintner, possibly born in Lancashire, seems to be the first of his family in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. His marriage to Susanna Clough, 8 July 1619, marks his first appearance in the registers of All Saints Church. He was buried on 18 Aug. 1649 and his widow took as a second husband, 24 Sept. 1657, one Thomas Bonner, a widower and three times Lord Mayor of Newcastle (bur. 19 Oct. 1660). She made her will 4 May 1682 (filed at Durham, printed by Phillips) and died in August 1690.

Issue (all bapt. in. All Saints Church):

i. Timothy, bapt. 23 May 1620, apprenticed May 1635 to Thomas Cleborne and then to Lorance Carr, m. 18 Aug. 1656, Elizabeth Carr, his master's widow. A member of the Merchant Adventurer's Company, he was dead prior to 30 May 1666, when his widow petitioned the Company for relief. She was mentioned in the will of Susanna Bonner in 1682. Issue included a son Ralph, bapt. 11 Nov. 1657, bur. 20 Dec. 1658.

ii. Margaret, bapt. 20 Oct. 1622, bur. 1 Apr. 1625.

iii. Mary, bapt. 14 Aug. 1625.

iv. Jane, bapt. 11 Nov. 1627, d. unm. prior to 6 June 1678 when her mother administered her estate.

v. Thomas, bapt. 24 June 1630, apprenticed to Robert Lawson 29 May 1646 and the following year to Robert Johnson. He "departed out of his master's service" and by the end of 1657, if not before, he was in Maryland, where he gave a deposition "aged about 27 years" in the Provincial Court (Estate of Slingsby, Md. Prov. Ct. Rec., Lib. B-3, f. 395, 22 Jan. 1657/8; Arch, of Md., 41:28). He served as Clerk of the Charles County court during the rebellion of Josias Fendall in 1660. Among his many land transactions should be noted a conveyance to "his beloved brother" Claiborne Lomax of 600 acres in Charles County (Charles Co. Court & Land Rec., Lib. G, f. 3, 9 Jan. 1676/7). So far as the records show he was never married. He died a resident of St. Marys County in 1680 and his brother was his administrator (Md. Inventories & Acc'ts, Lib. 7 - B , f. 179, 25 Feb. 1680/1, inventory by Justinian Gerard and John Goldsmith; Charles Co. Md. Court & Land Rec., Lib. I, f. 305, 13 June 1682, recovery of attorney's fees for the estate).

vi. Margaret, bapt. 23 Dec. 1632, m. 17 Oct. 1654 to John Thomas, sailmaker.

vii. (Rev.) John, bapt. 16 July 1635 (twin), sizar in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, 27 April 1650, B.A . (1653), M.A. (1657). He was a Nonconformist minister. He died 25 May 1693 at North Shields (Northumberland). By his wife Catherine (d. Jan. 1695/6) he had issue including sons John and Francis and daughters Susanna Wright and Catherine.

viii. Ralph, bapt. 16 July 1635 (twin), apprenticed first to his eldest brother and then to his stepfather Thomas Bonner. He was a member of the Company and died prior to Jan. 1661/2, when his mother administered his estate.

ix. Edward, bapt. 16 July 1638, bur. 27 Sept. 1638.

x. Moses, bapt. 2 Feb. 1639/40.

xi. Susan, bapt. 6 June 1641.

xii. Henry, bapt. 4 Oct. 1642, bur. 7 Oct. 1642.

xiii. Cleborne (Claiborne), bapt. 2 Nov. 1643, aged about 55 in 1698 (Md. Chancery Ct. Rec., Lib. P.C., f. 605). He had a legacy in his mother's will in 1682. With his wife Blanche he was in Maryland in or before 1668 (Md . Patents, Lib. 15, f. 358); the following year he witnessed an acknowledgment of indebtedness by Henry Bonner (Charles Co. Md. Court & Land Rec., Lib. E, f. 43, 27 April 1659, Arch. of Md., 60:336) and thereafter his name appears each year in one or another capacity, including Clerk of the county court. He died in 1699, his widow Blanche serving as Administratrix (Md. Inventories & Acc'ts, Lib. 19½B, f. 37, 28 Dec. 1699, inventory; ibid., Lib. 20, f. 193, 7 Dec. 1701, account). Six children are recorded (Charles Co. Md. Court & Land Rec., Lib. P, passim), all born on the family plantation at the head of the Wicomico River:

1. Ralph, b. 31 July 1673.
2. Susan, b. 3 April 1675.
3. Catherine, b. 13 May 1677.
4. Cleborne, b. 22 Jan. 1678/9.
5. Thomas, b. 8 April 1681.
6. John, b. 20 Nov. 1683.

Thomas and Cleborne Lomax may have had yet another sister whose baptism was not recorded in the All Saints registers. On 13 March 1670/1 Henry Bonner gave a power of attorney to his "loving brother: Thomas Lomax (Charles Co., Md. , Court & Land Rec., Lib. E, f. 39, Arch. of Md. 60:234). This instrument, in the usual form, was witnessed by John and Thomas Taylor whose mother Elizabeth, wife first of John Taylor, then of William Wilkes, and third of Walter Story, had married Henry Bonner in 1670 (Md. Patents, Lib. A.B.H., f. 427, 16 Aug. 1655; Long v. Bonner, Md. Chancery Ct. Rec., Lib. C.D., f. 42, 14 Feb. 1670/1, Arch. of Md. 51:44; Charles Co., Md., Court & Land Rec., Lib. F, f. 4, 1 Sept. 1674). The avowal of relationship is certainly capable of an interpretation which would make Elizabeth the sister of Thomas, keeping in mind the fact that Thomas was not married. Against this interpretation is the fact that no baptism is recorded for a daughter Elizabeth in the All Saints register, nor in the registers of neighboring parishes; nor is Elizabeth mentioned in the will of her putative mother Susanna Bonner, though Cleborne is mentioned. And, while Elizabeth makes many appearances in Maryland records for a period of almost sixty years (1652-711) , at no time is her age made a matter of record from which a baptism during one of those years for which the registers are defective might be deduced. It is possible, as an alternative suggestion, that Henry Bonner was the son of Thomas's stepfather the Lord Mayor and was Thomas's "brother" only by courtesy (here, again, the registers do not provide a son Henry for Thomas and Grace Bonner), or even that the common profession of attorney was felt to bind Henry and Thomas together as "beloved" brethren. For now, the issue must be left open; but the author, a descendant of Elizabeth through the only son of her third husband, Walter Story (d. 1667), would be glad to receive evidence to settle the question or suggestions for further research. 
LOMAX, Ralph Sr. (I39913)
 
25213 (1) Thompson, Neil D., The English Ancestry of Thomasine (Clench) Frost, First Wife of Edmund Frost of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in New England Historical and Genealogical Register, July 1999, v. 153, pp. 279, 287-289:

6. ROBERT CLENCH (John, John) was baptized at Coddenham 22 June 1572, and died at Witcham, Cambridgeshire, before 12 July 1633 when his will, dated 25 Jan. 1631/2 was proved. [PCC 80 Huddlestone]. He married, first, at Bottisham, Cambridgeshire, 24 Dec. 1598, Joan Webbe, who was born say 1579, and was living July 1610 when her youngest child was baptized, daughter of Thomas and Susanna (Smyth) Webbe. He married, second, Susan _____, who survived him.

Robert Clench was for a time a landowner at Bottisham and after 1610 moved to Witcham in the Isle of Ely, where the early parish registers are lacking and the Bishop's Transcripts are very incomplete; no burial record has been found for him or for either of his wives. The executors named in his will, his friend Stephen Jellett, his brother John Clench and his nephew Almott Clench, all declined to serve as such and instead accepted appointment as administrators cum testament annexo. He devised his house and land in Witcham to his [unnamed] wife and daughter Priscilla Clench, made special provision for his eldest daughter Susanna Felton, and left the residue of his estate to his [unnamed] six younger children. Susanna and her six younger children, in this case named, were bequeathed 4 pounds each in the will of their grandmother, Susanna (Smyth) (Webbe) Fowkes, widow of Thomas Webbe and John Fowkes, on the condition that their father, Robert Clench, who had married Joan, a daughter of the testatrix, make no claim against the estate.

An unsuccessful attempt has been made to locate probate and other records relating to the four sons of Robert Clench. Even in their absence, and the daughter Thomasine being unmarried when her father's will was made, the identification of Thomasine, wife of Edmund Frost, with Thomasine, second surviving daughter of Thomas Clench, seems clear. Since the eldest daughter married at age 25, Thomasine's marriage at age 26 is not objectionable; their brother Robert Clench, whose family retained a connection with Bottisham, did not marry until he was over forty years of age.

Children of Robert and Joan (Webbe) Clench, baptized at Bottisham, Cambridgeshire:

i. SUSANNA CLENCH, bp. 23 March 1599/1600; m. at Downham, Cambridgeshire, 6 April 1625, NICHOLAS FELTON.

ii. PRISCILLA CLENCH, bp. 22 March 1600/1; d. young.

iii. ROBERT CLENCH, bp. 28 Feb. 1601/2; d. probably during the period from 1647 to 1650 when there were no records kept at Bottisham; no probate found; m. at Milton, Cambridgeshire, 7 Feb. 1643/4, MARY PETIT, bur. at Bottisham 26 July 1702.

iv. EDWARD CLENCH, bp. 22 Sept. 1603; living Jan. 1631/2; no further record.

v. AMBROSE CLENCH, b. 1605; living Jan. 1631/2; not further traced.

vi. FRANCIS CLENCH, bp. 5 July 1607; living Jan. 1631/2; not further traced.

vii. THOMASINE CLENCH, bp. 6 Oct. 1608; m. at Earls Colne, Essex, 16 April 1634, by Rev. Thomas Shepard, EDMUND FROST. Children.

viii. KATHERINE CLENCH, bp. 4 June 1610; living Jan. 1631/2; not further traced.

Child of Robert and Susan (______) Clench:

ix. PRISCILLA CLENCH, bp. at Witcham, Cambridgeshire, 5 Oct. 1617; living Jan. 1631/2; not further traced.
 
CLENCH, Robert (I5966)
 
25214 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

DOROTHY [SCOTT], bapt. 25 Jan. 1557/8; d by 1564 as not in father's will?
 
SCOTT, Dorothy (I39558)
 
25215 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

EDWARD [SCOTT], perhaps b 1540 - 44; m Elizabeth _____; ch.: Mary 1571, Edward 1574, Richard 1576 - d 1577, Elizabeth 1578, Richard 1580, Francis 1583, George 1585 - d.y., Faith. An Elizabeth Scott was buried 14 March 1596/7; he d 1627, was a clothier.

["]8 September 1627 - the will of EDWARD SCOTT of Glemsford . . . in reasonably good health . . . £60 for the poor of Glemsford, to be invested in land, £3 per year in the meantime . . . to daughter Mary late wife of Ambrose Brewster deceased £500 . . . to Ambrose Brewster & Edward Brewster, two of the sons of the said Mary £500 each . . . to Thomas, Matthew, Faith and Alice, children of my said daughter Mary Brewster £50 each at age 21 . . . to Elizabeth wife of George Chrispeland, daughter of the said Mary Brewster my daughter £100 . . . to Barbera the daughter of my brother John Scott, now wife of Benjamin Roydon £100 . . . to Francis Scott the son of Francis Scott my son deceased £250 . . . to Faith my daughter, late the wife of William Leader deceased & before the wife of Richard Herrington deceased £270 . . . to Mary Herrington daughter of the said Richard & Faith £150 at age 21 . . . to Richard Herrington son of the aforesaid Richard Herrington £20 at age 21 . . . to all the children of the said William Leader by my said daughter Faith £200 to be equally divided among them at age 21 . . . to Thomas Fuller & Elizabeth Fuller children of my daughter Elizabeth deceased who was the wife of Robert Fuller £100, of which £40 to Thomas at age 21, £60 to Elizabeth at age 21 or in one year at choice of my executor . . . Whereas Richard Scott my son deceased did in November last year convey to me his capitol messuage called the Place in Glemsford for £406 to be paid, etc. [i.e. mortgaged the property for the £406], I assign it to my son Edward . . . to Edward Scott one of the sons of Richard Scott my son £200 at age 21 . . . to Elizabeth Scott daughter of the same Richard £50 . . . to Mary, Sara, & Frances, 3 other of the daughters of my said son Richard £50 each at age 21 . . . to Margaret wife of Thomas Watling, gentleman, & daughter of said son Richard £4 yearly for life and after her decease £50 to be divided among her children at age 21 . . . to Faith Scott daughter of said Richard several houses in Glemsford . . . to Jane my late servant, wife of Michael Wells, £100 . . . to Jane her daughter 40s. at age 21 or day of marriage . . . to Susan Brewster my servant 40s . . . to Richard Skingle my servant £3 . . . to Philip Towne my servant 20s . . . to Ann my kinswoman, wife of William Turner, weaver, £5 . . . to Alice wife of John Hayward my kinswoman £5 . . . to Mary wife of John Evered, weaver, my kinswoman, £5 . . . to Tabitha wife of Richard Finch £6 . . . to Thomas Warren & Edward Warren my kinsmen £5 each . . . to Susan wife of Richard Whitmore 40s . . . to Phebe wife of Martyn Briden 40s . . . my loving friend and kinsman Mr. William Gage & my loving friend Thomas Wright of Hartest to be supervisors and to them £10 and £5 respectively . . . residue to Edward Scott my eldest son, he to be executor . . . to daughters Mary and Faith, one of my least silver cups to each . . . Signed . . . Witnesses: John Garnons, Anthony Beall, Thomas Wright.["] Proved 20 December 1627. (P.C.C. 119 Simmer)

(2) http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk:

Description: Will of Edward Scott, Clothier of Glemsford, Suffolk
Date [proved]: 20 December 1627
Catalogue reference: PROB 11/152
Dept: Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury
Series: Prerogative Court of Canterbury and related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers
Piece: Name of Register: Skynner Quire Numbers: 60 - 124
Image contains 1 will of many for the catalogue reference 
SCOTT, Edward (I21846)
 
25216 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

ELIZABETH [SCOTT], bapt. 30 March 1555; m 1 Nov. 1581 at Glemsford, Ambrose Jeffrey 
SCOTT, Elizabeth (I39557)
 
25217 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

His [Richard Scott's] first wife, Joanna, was buried 23 August 1556. Seven weeks later, on 8 October 1556, he and Joan Tollington (or Tollerton) were married. She was the widow of Christopher Tollerton of Cavendish, whose will, dated 12 May 1556, was proved 23 September following. She apparently had a still earlier marriage, for she had a son named Andrew James, according to Richard Scott's will. This was, no doubt, the Andrew who was bequeathed 40s. and a cow by Christopher Tollerton, no surname or relationship given. Richard Scott was buried on 5 February 1564/5. He was then designated as "senior" to distinguish him from a younger Richard Scott also living in Glemsford - a first cousin once removed. His widow, Joan, remarried 26 September 1565 to Thomas Hayward, apparently her fourth husband.
 
(JAMES), Joan (I21851)
 
25218 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

JOAN [SCOTT], bapt. 7 June 1550; buried 11 Jan. 1553/4 at Glemsford. 
SCOTT, Joan (I39554)
 
25219 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

JOAN [SCOTT], twin, bapt. 25 Jan. 1557/8; buried 27 May 1558. 
SCOTT, Joan (I39559)
 
25220 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

JOHN [SCOTT], eldest son; m 6 Oct. 1560, Ann Strutt; had a dau. Elizabeth, bapt. 30 Aug. 1562; a John Scott m 10 June 1574 at Glemsford, Margaret Hiles, prob. his 2nd m; John Scott was buried 25 May 1578; Margaret Scott was buried 12 March 1591. . . .
 
SCOTT, John (I39551)
 
25221 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

KATHERINE [SCOTT], b about 1538?; m 7 Nov. 1563 at Whepstead, William Lilly. 
SCOTT, Katherine (I39552)
 
25222 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

MARY [SCOTT], b about 1540?; m 27 May 1564, Thomas Warren. 
SCOTT, Mary (I39553)
 
25223 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

RICHARD [SCOTT], bapt. 26 Sept. 1553; d 1627 testate, (P.C.C. - 53, Skynner); a clothier.

(2) http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk:

Will of Richard Scott, Clothier of Glemsford, Suffolk
Reference: PROB 11/151/640
Description: Will of Richard Scott, Clothier of Glemsford, Suffolk
Date [proved]: 05 May 1627
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record
Closure status: Open Document, Open Description 
SCOTT, Richard (I39556)
 
25224 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 101-102:

SUSANNA [SCOTT], bapt. 11 Feb. 1551/2; buried 21 April 1552. 
SCOTT, Susanna (I39555)
 
25225 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 85:

ANNE [FROST], bapt. 28 Nov. 1586 at Glemsford; buried 27 Dec. 1586.
 
FROST, Anne (I5085)
 
25226 (1) Threlfall, John Brooks, Fifty Great Migration Colonists to New England and Their Origins, Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 2008, pp. 93-94:

JOHN BELGRAVE of Leverington, Cambridgeshire, England, married Joanna Strutt, daughter of John and Catherine Strutt of Glemsford, Suffolk, 22 September 1560 at Glemsford. Joanna was buried at Leverington 14 August 1577. John Belgrave married secondly at Saint James parish, Bury Saint Edmunds, 25 August 1578, Elizabeth Fayerfoxe (or Fairfax) of Bury Saint Edmunds. John Belgrave was buried at Leverington 12 February 1590/91. His will, bearing his signature, is abstracted below.

Leverington is fifty miles northwest of Glemsford.

["]3 February 1590/91 - the will of JOHN BELGRAVE of Leverington, Isle of Ely, county Cambridge, yeoman, sick in body . . . to be buried in the churchyard of Leverington . . . to son Abraham Belgrave my house and land in Levering ton where I dwell . . . to son George Belgrave land in Seafield, Long Meadow and Catfield, all in Leverington . . . to son Jacob Belgrave land in Hylcrofte and Mayes Lane . . . to son Thomas Belgrave land in Long Meadow in Leverington and my house and buildings in Glemsford in Suffolk . . . my three daughters: Tomyzin, Elizabeth and Catheren Belgrave, to have 10s. each from the estate, and ??10 from my sons Abraham, George and Jacob respectively . . . to Elizabeth and William Froste, children unto my son Edward Froste, a ewe and a lamb . . . to Mr. Bowler our parson two of my best wethers . . . residue to wife Elizabeth Belgrave, she to be executrix . . . son in law Edward Froste supervisor. Witnesses: Mr. Richard Bowler the writer of this will, Henry Johnson, Richard Coxen, Thomas Fricewell with others.["] Proved 11 March 1590/91. (Ref.: Consistory Court of Ely, 5:39)

Children, baptized at Leverington: . . .

[i] THOMASINE, bapt. 1 Feb. 1561/2; m 26 July 1585 at Glemsford, Edward Frost, son of John. Edward was bapt. there 13 March 1560/61, was buried at Stanstead, Suffolk, 3 Aug. 1616.

[ii] ELIZABETH, bapt. 16 Feb. 1563/4; alive in 1591.

[iii] CATHERINE, bapt. 31 March 1566; alive in 1591.

[iv] THOMAS, bapt. 13 Dec. 1567; m 8 April 1602 at Glemsford, Suffolk, Susanna Fosbrook; ch.: Susanna bapt. 14 Nov. 1602, Anna buried 20 Feb. 1611/12. He was alive 1638 per will of George Osborne of Sudbury

[v] ABRAHAM, bapt. 27 Dec. 1569; alive in 1591.

[vi] GEORGE, bapt. 31 Aug. 1571; alive in 1591.

[vii] JACOB, b prob, 1573; m 1, _____; ch,: Susan bapt. 14 Sept. 1607 at Stanstead, Ann bapt. 20 Jan. 1610/11, John bapt. 5 March 1613/14, Thomas bapt. 17 May 1618; he m 2, 23 Jan. 1631/2 at Stanstead, Susan Watlock(?), a widow; ch.: Jacob bapt. 27 Dec. 1632, Richard bapt. 24 Aug. 1634, Susan bapt. 16 Sept. 1636 at St. Peter's, Sudbury. He d intestate & his widow was granted admin. of his estate on 3 April 1638.

[viii] BARBARA, bapt. 12 June 1575; buried 4 May 1576 at Leverington.

[ix] BARBARA, bapt. 27 June 1577; buried 17 Sept. 1589 at Leverington

[x] JOSEPH, bapt. 20 March 1579/80; buried 26 March 1580.

[xi] DORCAS, bapt. 9 May 1584; buried 1 May 1585 at Leverington.

[xii] ISAAC, bapt. 8 Oct. 1689 at Leverington; apparently d.y., as not in father's will of 1591.
 
BELGRAVE, John (I21871)
 
25227 (1) Tillman, Stephen Frederick, The Rennolds-Reynolds Family of England and Virginia, 1530-1948, Ann Arbor, MI: Edwards Brothers, Inc., 1948, p. 174:

JOHN FRANCIS REYNOLDS, son of John . . . and Sarah (Jenkins) Reynolds, b. 1732 in Surry County, N.C., and d. 1803 in Wilkes County, N.C. He m. Anna or Anne Blackburn, b. 4-28-1750 and d. 2-16-1827. Issue: Lois Elizabeth, who m. _____ Goodwin; Sara Avaline; Silas, b. 2-13-1784; Martha; Elzy Baker, b. 4-4-1792; Elizabeth, who m. _____ Rodnett; John, who m. _____ Evans; and Mary, who m. _____ McCord.

[Note by compiler: The foregoing list of issue is incomplete.]

(2) North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015:

Name: Francis Feynolds [sic; should re Reynolds]
Probate Date: 1803
Probate Place: Wilkes, North Carolina, USA
Inferred Death Year: Abt 1803
Inferred Death Place: North Carolina, USA
Item Description: Original Wills, Fletcher, Alpha J - Sanders, William

[Note by compiler: In his will, the testator made a bequest to his son-in-law, Reuben PARKES. (Reuben was married to the testator's daughter, Hannah REYNOLDS.)] 
REYNOLDS, John Francis Jr. (I42519)
 
25228 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, p. 361:

Edward Burwell, Gentleman, lived at Harlington, County Bedford, England. He married Jane, daughter of Edmund Wingate (or Wyngate) of Sharpenhoe, and had issue:

[1] Edward Burwell, of Harlington, County Bedford, Gentleman, who died in 1626. He married Dorothy, daughter of William Bedell, of Catworth, County Huntingdon. Mrs. Dorothy (Bedell) Burwell married second, Honorable Roger Wingate. 
BURWELL, Edward (I40136)
 
25229 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, p. 371:

. . . Sir James Bacon, of Friston Hall, Suffolk, . . . was knighted at White Hall in 1604, and died at Finsbury, London, January 17, 1618, and buried in St. Giles Church on the 11 February, 1618.

This worthy Knight, by Elizabeth, daughter of Francis and Anne (Drury) Bacon of Hessett, had two sons, Nathaniel and James; and three daughters, the latter all dying young. 
BACON, James (I40083)
 
25230 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, p. 385:

The daughters Anna and Martha named in the will of Anthony Smith were probably by an earlier marriage. 
SMITH, Anna (I40101)
 
25231 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, p. 385:

The daughters Anna and Martha named in the will of Anthony Smith were probably by an earlier marriage. 
SMITH, Martha (I40102)
 
25232 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, pp. 361-362:

Edward Burwell, of Harlington, County Bedford, Gentleman, who died in 1626. He married Dorothy, daughter of William Bedell, of Catworth, County Huntingdon. Mrs. Dorothy (Bedell) Burwell married second, Honorable Roger Wingate.

Edward and Dorothy (Bedell) Burwell, had issue:

1. Edward Burwell, baptized at Houghton Conquest, April 14, 1616; buried at Ampthill, March 4, 1622.

2. Dorothy Burwell, baptized at Ampthill, June 24, 1618.

3. Elizabeth Burwell, baptized at Ampthill, February 25, 1620.

4. Lewis Burwell (1621-1653). . . .

5. George Burwell, baptized, Ampthill, May 17, 1624.

6. Edward Burwell, baptized, Ampthill, February 19, 1625. 
BURWELL, Edward (I40127)
 
25233 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, pp. 363-364:

Honorable Lewis Burwell (only son and child to reach maturity of Lewis and Lucy [Higginson] Burwell), was born in Virginia; and died there December 19, 1710. He appears as a member of the Governor's Council in 1702 and continued to serve as a member thereof until his death. He was possessed of an ample fortune, consisting of "King's Creek," in York County (which he obtained through his first marriage), and the "Fairfield," later "Carter's Creek," estate in Gloucester County (which was formerly the home of his father, and later his own home), and lands in King William and James City Counties, together with negroes and other personalty. He occupied a worthy and influential position in the life of the colony.

Honorable Lewis Bur well (died 1710), married first, Abigail Smith, daughter of Anthony and Martha (Bacon) Smith, of Colchester, England . . . ; second, Mrs. Martha (Lear) Cole, widow of Colonel William Cole, of Warwick County . . . , and daughter of Colonel John Lear, of Nansemond County, Virginia. . . .

Honorable Lewis Burwell and his first wife, Abigail Smith, had issue:

1. Jane Burwell, died ante 1692.

2. Joanna Burwell, born 1675; died October 7, 1727; married, November 28, 1693, William Bassett (1670-1723), of "Eltham," New Kent County. . . .

3. Elizabeth Burwell, born circa 1673; died 1734; married Honorable Benjamin Harrison (1673-1710), of "Berkeley," Charles City County, Treasurer and Attorney-General of Virginia.

4. Nathaniel Burwell, born 1680; died 1721; succeeded his father at "Carter's Creek"; major of militia and member of the House of Burgesses. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Honorable Robert Carter, of "Corotoman," Lancaster County.

5. Lewis Burwell, born October 9, 1682; died September 17, 1696.

6. Lucy Burwell, born November 21, 1683; died December 16, 1716; married December, 1704, Edmund Berkeley, of "Barn Elms," Middlesex County, member of the Governor's Council.

7. Martha Burwell, born November 1685; died _____; married Henry Armistead, of Gloucester County.

8. Bacon Burwell, born February 22, 1686; died ante 1691/2.

9. James Burwell, born February 4, 1689; died October 6, 1718; inherited the "King's Creek" estate in York County. He married Mary Armistead.

Honorable Lewis Burwell and his second wife, Martha (Lear) Cole, had issue:

10. Mary Burwell, died 1704.

11. Lewis Burwell, of "King's Mill," James City County; married _____.

12. Jane Burwell, of whom nothing further is known.

13. Martha Burwell, born 1703; died May 27, 1738; married Colonel John Martin, of Caroline County. 
BURWELL, Lewis (I40099)
 
25234 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, pp. 375-377:

Can Martha Bacon (wife of Anthony Smith, of Colchester, and daughter of Reverend James Bacon, rector of Burgate in Suffolk, will proved January, 1649) be proved to have been a daughter by Reverend James Bacon's marriage to Martha Woodward?

There is no positive evidence, but such circumstantial evidence as we have all but proves that she was.

First. It is proved (by the will of Mrs. Elizabeth Woodward, dated August 3, 1631 . . . ) that Elizabeth, daughter of Reverend James Bacon, was a daughter by Martha Wodward; she is called in the said will: "Elizabeth daughter of my said daughter Martha Bacon." The registers of Burgate, Suffolk, show that "Anna Bacon, d. of Jacobi Bacon [was baptized] 18th November, 1631." Thus we can prove that Elizabeth and Anna, mentioned as daughters in the will of the Reverend James Bacon, 1649, were his daughters by his marriage with Martha Woodward.

Second. The date of the birth of Martha Bacon (who married Anthony Smith) is not known. Keith (Ancestry of Benjamin Harrison, page 26) says: "her baptism does not appear in the register of Burgate, or of the other parishes where it seemed likely to have taken place." But in the will of the Reverend James Bacon, dated September 24, 1647, proved January 23, 1649 [1649/50], his daughters are named in the following order: "to Elizabeth, Martha and Anne, my daughters." The mention of Martha after Elizabeth certainly indicates that Martha was younger than Elizabeth, and as Elizabeth is clearly identified as a child of the Reverend James Bacon by Martha Woodward (see above), the conclusion seems inevitable that Martha was also a daughter of the Reverend James Bacon by Martha Woodward.

Now as to the evidence that the said Martha Bacon married Anthony Smith, of Colchester.

Martha Bacon was unmarried at the date of the will of her father, the Reverend James Bacon, September 24, 1647. But the will of Anthony Smith, of Colchester, Essex . . . , dated August 3,1631 . . . ) that Elizabeth, daughter . . . "that parte of the lands which is partible and remains in reversion and to be equally divided betweene one Mrs. Burroughs, Mrs. Wilkinson and my sonne George if he be then liveing, after Mistress Pecke's her death my mother in lawe. The Mistress Pecke who had life interest in these lands is clearly Mrs. Martha (Woodward) Bacon-Pecke (wife of Reverend James Bacon and the Reverend Robert Pecke. . . . The will of the Reverend James Bacon gave the reversionary rights in certain lands after the death of his wife Martha to his children Nathaniel, Elizabeth, Martha and Anne (Anna). The "Mrs. Burroughs"' referred to in Anthony Smith's will was Elizabeth, daughter of Reverend James Bacon, who married September 16, 1647, Thomas Burrows . . . , and in her father's will is called "Elizabeth my daughter now the wife of Mr. Thomas Burrows." The "Mrs, Wilkinson" of Anthony Smith's will was quite clearly the daughter Anne (or Anna) mentioned as a reversionary legatee in the will of the Reverend James Bacon; and the fact that George Smith appears to have had a reversionary right in the lands together with "Mrs. Burroughs" and "Mrs. Wilkinson" is due to the fact that said George's mother, Martha, was named by her father, Reverend James Bacon, as a reversionary legatee.

The will of Anthony Smith (proved May 13, 1667 . . . ) also names his daughters, Anna, Martha, Elizabeth and Abigail. 
BACON, Martha (I40078)
 
25235 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, pp. 377-378:

Honorable Nathaniel Bacon (1620-1692) of Kings Creek, York County, Virginia

[Not to be confused with his first cousin, once removed, Nathaniel Bacon "the Rebel."]

The Honorable Nathaniel Bacon (son of the Reverend James Bacon, rector of Burgate, Suffolk, England), was baptized at Bury St. Edmunds, August 29, 1620. Evidently great care was expended on his education; he was probably a graduate of Cambridge, and certainly traveled in France in his youth or early manhood. About 1650 he came to Virginia and settling in York County soon established himself in the social and political life of the colony. In 1657 he appears as a member of the governor's council, holding office for one year; from 1655-1660 he was a member of the House of Burgesses from York County and in 1660 was re-appointed to the Council. From 1675-1687 he was auditor general of the colony, and also served as president of the governor's council, and in 1689 was acting-governor of Virginia. During the trying days of the so-called rebellion of his young kinsman, Nathaniel Bacon, the younger, the elder Nathaniel Bacon was one of Governor Sir William Berkeley's staunchest supporters and one of his young kinsman's most unrelenting opponents. Having acquired large possessions in the colony, he died in Virginia March 26, 1692, leaving his estate to his niece, Abigail, wife of Lewis Burwell . . . , and daughter of Anthony and Martha (Bacon) Smith, of Colchester. . . , and to other relatives and friends.

Honorable Nathaniel Bacon (1620-1692), married first, Mrs. Ann (Bassett) Smith, widow; second, Mrs. Elizabeth (Kingmill) Tayloe (1625-1691), widow of Colonel William Tayloe. There was no issue by either marriage.

(2) Townshend, Charles Hervey, "The Bacons of Virginia and Their English Ancestry," New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 37 (April 1883), pp. 194-196:

WILL OF COL. NATHANIEL BACON.

In the name of God, Amen. I Nathaniel Bacon, of the County of York in Virginia being sick, and weak of Body but of perfect sense and memory, do make this my last Will and Testament as follows. First I give my body to the Earth to be decently buried and my soul to God that gave it me hoping for a joyful resurrection thro' the merits of Jesus Christ my blessed Saviour and redeemer. As for what worldly good it hath pleased God to help me with my will is - Impr. After my just debts are paid I give to my loving Niece Abygall Burwell wife of Lewis Burwell of Gloucester County in Virginia the Plantation whereon I now reside and all other lands in Hampton and Benton parishes in York County by me purchased with all my rights or pretense of right and after her death to her son Lewis Burwell Junior and his heirs forever. Then I give to every one of Major Lewis Burwells children now living Fifty Pounds sterling to each of them Viz - Nathaniel, Lewis, James, Joanna, Elizabeth, Lucy and Martha.

Item - I give unto my niece Elizabath Sherry sister of aforesaid Abigail Burwell Thirty Pounds sterling. Item - I give and bequeath all my lands lying in Isle of Wight and Nancymond Countys in Virginia to my Nephew Lewis Burwell Junior and his wife Abigail Burwell and after their decease to Nathaniel and James Burwell sons of the aforesaid Lewis Burwell and to their heirs forever. Item - I give unto my Nephew Major Lewis Burwell all my lands lying and being in New Kent County to be managed sold and disposed of to the best advantage and the proper use and benefit of the said Lewis Burwells four daughters viz. Joanna, Elizabeth, Lucy and Martha now living. Item - I give unto my brother in law Thomas Burras (Burrows) of Berry [Bury St. Edmunds, County Suffolk] in England Twenty Pounds Sterling. Item - I give unto my brother in law Wilkyson [Mr. Wilkinson of Burgate] in England Twenty Pounds Sterling and Thirty Pounds to the said Wilkynsons wife. Item - I give unto Frances Lady Berkeley my riding horse Watts and Ten Pounds Sterling. Item - I give to Colonel Philip Ludwell Ten Pounds Sterling. Item - I give to the right Honorable the Lt Governor Francis Nicholson Esquire Twenty Pounds sterling. Item - I give to my secretary Cole Ten Pounds Sterling. Item - I give unto the Parish where I was born [St. Mary's, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England] Twenty Pounds Sterling to be paid into the hands of my brother Burrus [Burrows] and to be disposed of as he sees good. Item - I give Hampton Parish in York County in Virginia Twenty Pounds Sterling to be disposed of as the Vestry shall see fit. Item - I give to the Mulatto Kate her freedom at my decease, it being formerly promised by my deceased wife. It is my desire that Mr William Bassett be forever acquitted and discharged from the payment of any Bills, Bonds, Contracts or Debts whatsoever that there shall be found due to my estate at my decease, he giving to my executors hereafter named a full discharge and acquitance from all Debts and demands whatsoever he have or may have against me as I was Guardian and Executor in Trust of his Estate, he giving liberty to my Executor to remove what Estate shall be known to be mine on his plantation called "Mate-heart." Item - My desire is twenty pounds be laid out in Rings to be given to several friends according to the direction of my executor hereafter named. Item - I give unto Dr. Henry Powers as a legacy Five Pound Sterling. Item. I give unto Will Davis my Servant Ten Pounds Sterling per annum for what time he has to serve after my decease to an assistant to my Executors. Item -I give unto my nephew Major Lewis Burwell and to my loving niece Abygaill Burwell wife of said Lewis Burwell all my personal Estate and debts due to me either in England or Virginia or elsewhere as also all my ready money: ships or parts of ships and all my goods and Chattels Whatsoever to me belonging in any part of the world not already expressed in this Will to be disposed of by the said Lewis Burwell and Abygaill his wife to the real use and behoof of the children lawfully begotten of the said Lewis Burwell and Abygail his wife and to no other extent and purpose whatsoever and to be divided between them according to the discretion of their said father and mother or the longest survivor of them. Item - I do make Major Lewis Burwell and his wife Abygaill Burwell sole Executors of this my last Will and Testement, hereafter revoking all other Wills and Testement whatsoever, to the true performance of which I have here unto set my hand and seal this 15th day of March 1691-2.

Signed Nathaniel Bacon. {Seal.}

Memorandum

That if Elizabeth Peters daughter of Mr Thomas Peters - if she shall happen to live to the age of Twenty One Years or be married my will is that she be possessed with a negro girl named Moll now about ten years of age now living on the Plantation Tower belonging to the said Peters.

Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of us the word nancymond and sold first interlined.

Witness

William Cole
Stephen Fourall
Joseph Ring
Hen Powers

York County March 24th 1691-2 Presented in Court by Major Lewis Burwell one of the Executors of the within written Will and was likewise then and there proved by the oaths of the Honble Colonel William Cole and Joseph Ring two of the Witnesses there unto and is ordered to be admitted to the records which is accordingly performed.

William Sedgewick Clk

Duly recorded in presence of an order of the General Court

Dated December 26th 1692

Wllliam Sedgewick C.C.
Miles Carey G.C.C.

A Copy - Teste;

Peyton Drew C.G.C. 
BACON, Nathaniel (I40066)
 
25236 (1) Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, pp. 383-386:

Anthony Smith of Colchester, County Essex, England, appears from extant records to have been a resident of St. James Parish, Colchester, as early as 1642 when his name appears as a collector of assessments in that parish, and from that date on to 1661 his name appears alternately as collector and assessor of assessments made under ordinances and acts of Parliament and declarations of the Lord Protector. It is evident that Mr, Smith was a member of the Parliamentary Party.

Anthony Smith of Colchester, County Essex, England, was a member of the Common Council of Colchester on September 9, 1659, having probably been elected at the August meeting which was the principal one of the year. On January 19, 1659/60, he was promoted to be an assistant (of whom there were eighteen, as well as eighteen members of the Secundum Concilium). The period was one of many changes in the Corporation, due to the growth of the moderate Presbyterian party as opposed to the Fanatics. In Charles Second's Charter of August, 1663, Anthony Smith was named third in the order of the Assistants, so he was probably a man of some account. He appears, however, to have joined the section of the Council refusing to take the oath, for "not sworn" stands against his name on August 25th and after August 28th it disappears. . . .

Anthony Smith, of Colchester, Essex (died 1667), married Martha Bacon, daughter of the Reverend James Bacon, rector of Burgate, Suffolk . . . , and had issue:

1. George Smith.

2. Elizabeth Smith, married _____ Sherry or Sheriffe.

3. Abigail Smith, born 1656; died November 12, 1692; married Honorable Lewis Burwell, of Carters Creek, Gloucester County, Virginia. . . .

[Note: The daughters Anna and Martha named in the will of Anthony Smith were probably by an earlier marriage.]

(2) Will of Anthony Smyth of Tanner, Colchester [sic] :

Reference: PROB 11/324/81
Description: Will of Anthony Smyth of Tanner, Colchester [sic]
Date: 13 May 1667
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record
Closure status: Open Document, Open Description

The following is a copy of the will of Anthony Smith of Colchester [from Torrence, Clarence, Winston of Virginia and Allied Families, Richmond, VA: Whittet & Shepperson, 1927, pp. 384-385]:

ln the name of God Amen August the Twenty nine one thousand six hundred sixty two I Anthony Smyth of Colchester in the County of Essex Tanner and within the diocese of London . . . And of the worldly Goods which God of his goodnes hath lent me I give and bequeath as followeth In primis I give to my sonne George, all my land lyeng and being in Snape both ffree and coppie being in the occupation of one John Hamond and lyeing in the County of Suffolke to him and his heyres for ever and also that parte of the lands which is partible and remaines in reversion and to be equally devided betweene one Mrs. Burroughs Mrs. Wilkinson and my sonne George if hee bee then liveing (after Mistress Peckes her death my Mother in lawe) Item I give and bequeath my other houses and lands lyeing and being In Mendham in Norfolke in the occupation of Walter Reynor and Samuell Lemon To be sould and to be equally devided betweene my fower daughters namely Anna Martha Elizabeth and Abigaile Item I give and bequeath my Stocke in my yard and within my house to bee sould and my debts and funerall charges to be paid and the overplus thereof to be devided betweene my foure daughters aforesaid: Anna Martha Elizabeth and Abigaile Provided Yett and my will is that if happen that my sonne George shall departe this life before he accomplish the age of one and twenty yeares that then my two eldest daughters namely Anna and Martha shall have and hould my land lyeing and being in Mendham aforesaid (if it be not sould before) according to the appointment of this my last will and testament, but in case it be sould before, my will is that my two eldest daughters shall have the money it was sold for equally divided between them, and then also my will is that my two youngest daughters namely Elizabeth and Abigaile shall have and hould that other house and lands in Snape aforesaid together with that parte of land which remains in revertion to them and to their heyres for ever And then my will and meaning is, that the aforesaid Overplus that ariseth of my stocke, my debts and other charges being paid shall equally he devided among my foure surviveing daughters. Item my will and pleasure is That my eldest daughter Anna shall have the care and education of my three youngest children, viz. Elizabeth Abigaile and George and I allowe her the rent of the house and land in Mendham untill it be sould according to this my will, and after it be sould my will and meaning is that shee shall receive the benefitt & proceed of their portions towards their Educations And I ordaine and appointe my two eldest daughters viz Anna and Martha aforesaid joynte Executrixes to this my last will and Testament And I doe earnestly request my loveing friend John Baldwin of Lexden in the aforesaid County of Essex, Tanner to be assistant and ayding to my two daughters in selling my goods after they be prized and in gathering in my debts And I doe give him Tenn pounds of Lawfull money of England for his paines therein. And I doe intreate Mr. George Smyth of Dedham my brother and Mr. Thomas Burroughs of Bury St. Edmunds in Suffolke to be supervisors of this my will. And I witnes that this is my last will and testament by my hand and seale. And I doe appointe my well beloved brother Mr. Thomas Sheriff of Diff in Norffolke to sell the aforesaid in Convenient tyme. Anthony Smyth. Read, Sealed and delivered or published in the presence of George Smyth and Thomas Clench. Proved. 13 May 1667 by Anna Smyth wife of Simon Coolidge, daughter, & executrix named in Will. 
SMITH, Anthony (I40079)
 
25237 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 227-234:

Jan Jans Buys mentioned in declaration of April 24, 1668 (REC., 47:163). KCo., 56 states that a Jan Buys of the Wallabout was a member of the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, in 1677, and was on the assessment roll of Brooklyn in 1683 and on the census list of 1698. A John Buys and Susanna _____ his wife of Brooklyn conveyed in 1694 lands to Jurian Bries as per p. 5 of Liber 2 of Conveyances. 
BUYS, Jan Jans (I12665)
 
25238 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 231:

Hendrick Janse Buys "baptized March 15, 1654, son of Jan Cornelis Buys. Sponsors: Jan Gerritszen, Gysbert Lubbertszen and Marritie _____ (KCo., 57; REC., 56:264; BDC. I:37). We have no further record of this child. He is not mentioned as a surviving child of Eybe Lubberts in the declaration of his father Jan Cornelis Buys made on April 24, 1668. He may have been the child for whose grave Jan Cornelis Buys paid in 1669 (Flat. Frost Burials 17). 
BUYS, Hendrick Janse (I12658)
 
25239 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 232:

Abigail Janse Buys. REC., 56:364 thinks that she was probably a child of Jan Cornelis Buys for the reason that on "December 14, 1679, Daniel, son of _____ Denten and Abigael _____ was baptized. Sponsors: Jan Buys and Cornelia Verwey" (Brkn, 152). This surmise seems to be based upon the names of the sponsors at baptism. It may be correct, but is by no means a proven fact. I am inclined to think that the sponsor registered as Cornelia Verwey is a misinterpretation for Cornelis Verwey - and if so the conjecture of REC. 56:364 would be somewhat more strongly supported. 
BUYS, Abigail Janse (I12661)
 
25240 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 234:

Jacob Janse Buys, born __ between August 24, 1663, and December 13, 1666; d. __ at __ "November 22, 1690, banns of matrimony were published between Jakop Janse Buys, young man from Flatbush and Marritie Jores, maiden from the ferry. Sponsors: Joris Jakopsen, the bride's father and Jan Cornelissen Buys, the groom's father" (Brkn: 142; KCGC:95). Marritie Jores was the daughter of Joris Jakopsen and Tryntje Claesen (KCo :152-3). There was a Jacobus Buys residing near New Brunswick, N. J. in 1696.

Children of Jacob Janse Buys and Marritie Jores:

1. Jan, "son of Jakop Jansen Buys and Marritje Joris was baptized October 18, 1691. Sponsors: Jan Buys and Tryntje Klaes" (Brkn: 163).

2. Joris, "son of Jakop Janse Buys and Marritje Jooris was baptized March 4, 1694. Sponsors: Jeronimus Rappalje and Annetje Teunes" (Brkn:166).

3. Femmetje, "daughter of Jacob Buys and Marretie Buys was baptized April 10, 1698. Sponsors: Michiel Hans [Bergen] and Femmetje, his wife" (Brkn:172). The last sponsor was the daughter of Teunis Nyssen (or Denyse) and Femmetje Jans?which latter was the child's deceased paternal grandmother.

4. _____ name not given baptized October 26, 1702. Sponsors: Abram Metzlaar and wife Haremtje _____ (Brkn:179). 
BUYS, Jacob Janse (I12653)
 
25241 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 235:

Cornelis Teunise, who was a minor in 1667. He married (1) August 27, 1687, Neeltje Bogaert, daughter of Teunis Gysbertse Bogaert and Sara Joris Rapalie; he m. (2) Rebecca _____ (KCo.:41, 92-94). [Note by compiler: Cornelis' wife Neeltje was mentioned in his will dated August 24, 1727, but his wife Rebecca was not.]

(2) Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000:

Page: 475
Name: Cornelius Teunissen
Date: 24 Aug 1727
Location: Raratan River, Somerset Co.
Will of. Wife, Neelye, the home plantation on Raritan River, during widowhood. Oldest son, Cornelius, one-half of same at her remarriage or death, and to pay to my eldest daughter, Fenmeye, widow of George Fairly £300. Second son, Tunis, to have the other half and weaving looms. Peter DuMont, John Tunissen, Junior, Derk Van Veghten, to proportion said plantation equally between these sons. Tunis to pay my youngest daughter, Sarah, £300. Third son, John, the plantation on which he now lives, at the "bound brook," which was purchased of Jonathan Douty. The youngest son, Dinis, that plantation between the first and second mountains, bought of Jacob Sebring, on which my son Cornelius now lives. Residue of estate. consisting of bonds, plate, jewels, cattle, horses, slaves, etc., to be divided equally among the six children. Executors - sons Cornelius and Tunis. Witnesses - Peter Sonmans, Manuel Correll, Noah Butterton. Proved 3 Oct. and 3 Nov., 1731.
Lib. B, p. 238. 
TEUNISE, Cornelis (I12015)
 
25242 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 235:

Elsje Teunise, "baptized May 10, 1648, daughter of Theunis Nyssen. Sponsors: Barent Bal and Elsje Pieters" (BDC, 1:24). She married December __ 1669, Gerrit Snediker (KCo., 94 and 267; REC., 47: 170 and 227). 
TEUNISE, Elsje (I12647)
 
25243 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), p. 236:

Thys (i.e. Mattys or Matthew) Janse Buys, baptized January 14, 1674, son of Jan Corn Buys and Willemtie Thyssen. Sponsors: Jan Corneliszen Ryck and Sytie Martens" (BDC, I:113). These sponsors were Jan Cornelis Damen (alias Ryck) and his wife Sytie Martens (KCo. 83). According to KCo. 57, he married Lysbet _____ and had:

1. Jan Buys, baptized July 7, 1700, son of Thys Buys and Lysbet _____ Sponsors: Jan Buys and Hilletje Simense" (Brkn.175). KCo. 57 states that he married Neeltje _____.

2. Willempje Buys, baptized October 26, 1702, daughter of Thys Buys and Lysbet _____ Sponsors: Jan Ariaanse and Annetje Pieters" (Brkn. 179). 
BUYS, Thys (I12667)
 
25244 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), pp. 227-229, 233-236:

JAN CORNELIS BUYS, known as the soldier, emigrated in 1648. From the RECORD, Volume 54:306, we obtain the following item: "Gleanings from Book 2 of Conveyances, Brooklyn, Kings County, N. Y." p. 179:

John Cornelis Buys, aged 38 years and Dirck Jansen, aged about 32 years, acknowledge they heard Jan Evertse Bout in the house of Jan Damon (i.e. Damen), tavern keeper in Brooklyn, say that he did not give Adam Brewer, the above property, but [did give it to] Adam Brewer's children (Statement not clear). Both sign August 27, 1667, in presence of Pieter Janse School and Denys Isaac Van Sartervelt, "honest persons." John C. Buys signs by mark and Arent Evertsen is an extra witness for Dircke Janse. Acknowledged and recorded September 12, 1698, before me Henry ffilkins, Registrar.

If John Cornelis Buys was 38 years old on August 20, 1667, he was born in 1629 or earlier; and as he came over to this country in 1648, he was 19 years old when he emigrated and was about 22 years old when his first child by Eybe Lubbertse was baptized (BDC, I:33). This statement made in 1667 was not recorded until 1698 - at the time of the settlement of the estate of Adam Brouwer, whose will was probated at that time. Jan Cornelis Buys took the oath of allegiance in Brooklyn in September, 1687, he having then been 39 years in this country (HSYB, 1896:162). On December 4, 1654, he was granted a patent for 25 morgens of land across the North River, between Gemoenepoe and Kil van Kol (New Jersey). (CDM:381). He resided at the Wallabout and was a member of the Reformed Dutch Church in Brooklyn in 1677 (Stiles Brkn., I:427). He was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn in 1675, 1676 and 1683 (Stiles Brkn., I:430, 434, and 437). He obtained a patent in 1662 from Governor Stuyvesant for 28 morgens of land in Flatbush, lying between the farm of Cors Jans Boomgart and that of Adriaen Hegeman, and also for plain-land and salt meadow, as per Liber A.:31 of Flatbush records. He was occasionally referred to on the records as Jan the soldier (KCo., 56).

F. W. 132 gives the following item:

564-1649, December 12. Will, written in Dutch of which the following is an abstract of the translation thereof: DAMEN, JAN JANSEN, of Manhattan Island, mentions: Wife _____ [Not named]; son of deceased sister, Hendrickie Jans, now living with the testator and called Jan Cornelissen Buys, alias Jan Damen; brothers [i.e. brothers of the testator] Cornelis Jansen Cuyper, Cornelis Jansen Damen and Willem Jansen Damen; sister [i.e. sister of the testator] Neltie Jane Damen; the poor of Bunick in the Diocese of Utrecht. Mentions real estate and personal property. Witnesses: Thomas Hall, Cornelis Cornelissen Van Houten and Jacob Kip, Clerk (N. Y. Col. Manuscripts, III:72-73 and CDM.:51).

HNN., I:434-5 gives the following item:

Jan Jansen Dam (or Damen) married Ariaentje Cuvel. He removed subsequently to New Amsterdam [where his name appears on the records as early as April 19, 1638 (CDM:1)] ; he was elected one of the Twelve Men and also of the Eight Men (NNR. 52, 54). He amassed a considerable wealth and was one of the owners of the privateer La Garce. In 1649 he went to Holland with C. Van Tienhoven, to defend Stuyvesant against the complaints of Van der Donck and others, and died on his return on June 18, 1651. He does not seem to have had any children. He had three brothers: Cornelis Jansen Cuyper Cornelis Jansen Damen and Willem Jansen Damen; and two sisters: Neeltje and Hendrickje. He adopted the son of the last named sister - Jan Cornelis Buys - who assumed his name, having been left 600 Car. guilders. Jan Jansen Damen, at his death, willed 400 Car. guilders to the poor of Bunick, in the province of Utrecht. The inventory of his personal property fills 10 folio pages in the records.

From the above items we see that JAN CORNELIS BUYS (alias JAN DAMEN) was the son of a Cornelis Buys and his wife Hendrickje Jans Damen, and was the nephew and adopted son of Jan Jansen Damen.

Items of interest relative to Ariaentje Cuvel (or Cuvilje), wife of Jq,n Jansen Damen, may be seen in CDM:1, 53, 63, 123 and 326 and relative to Jan Jansen Damen in same volume, 1 to 55, inclusive.

In connection with the statement of HNN, 434-5, which says that Jan Jansen Damen "does not seem to have had any children," I call attention to the following item (CDM, 1): "April 30, 1638, Report, William Weyman and Jan Tomassen Groen, referees of the settlement made by Ariaentje Cevely on her children." It would seem from this item that if she had any children that they were by some other husband than Jan Jansen Damen. That she did have children by another husband is demonstrated by the following item quoted from NAP, 306-7:

Our information upon this point is derived from the Journal of the Labadist missionaries, Danker and Sluyter, who visited New York in 1679. While in the town they lodged with one Jacob Hellekers, the site of whose house is now occupied by the building No. 255, Pearl St., near Fulton St. They were therefore near neighbors to Jan Vinje, with whom they soon became acquainted. He was then, they tell us, about sixty-five years of age, a prominent man, well known to all the citizens, many of whom had themselves resided in the town and had been intimately acquainted with him for from thirty to forty years. It was the common understanding that he was the first person born in the colony, and the date of his birth would therefore go back to the year 1614. His parents, so the Labadists inform us, were Guillaume Vigne, and his wife Adrienne Cuville, from Valenciennes in France. How they came to be at New Amsterdam in the early days of the trading-post we do not know, but there is certainly nothing improbable in the assertion that a trader or an officer of the post should have had his family with him at New Amsterdam. In the mouths of their Dutch neighbors, the husband became known as Willem Vinje, and his wife as Adriana Cuvilje. There is reason to believe that Willem Vinje was the first tenant of the farm laid out north of the present Wall St. by the West India Company, and that he died there. In 1632 his widow married Jan Jansen Damen, with whom the farm is more generally associated. At the date last named, as we axe informed by an instrument in the Albany records, of the four children of Willem Vinje and his wife, two were married, Maria (to Abraham Verplanck), and Christina (to Dirck Volckertsen), while two, Rachel and Jan, were "minors"; as both of the latter, however, were married within the next six years (Rachel to the Secretary Van Tienhoven), they must have been in the latter years of their minority in 1632, and the age of Jan Vinje, according to the Labadists, which would have been seventeen or eighteen at that time, is thus confirmed.

. . . Adriana Cuvilje was the widow of Gulyn (Guilliam, Willem) Vinje; by whom she had four children, one of whom, Rachel, married Secretary Cornelis Van Tienhoven; so Jan Jansen Damen became Van Tienhoven's stepfather-in-law, which accounts for his active support of Van Tienhoven and also of Governor Kieft.

From CDM, we obtain the following items:

November 29, 1663, Petition of Cornelis Jansen [Vanderveer] of Midwout, for pardon, he having accidentally killed Jan Damen's son, aged 8 years (CDM, 255).

November 19, 1663, Gerrit Cornelis of Midwout, in support of the above petition (CDM, 255).

November 24, 1663, Lammetje, wife of Jan Strycker, in corroboration of the above (CDM, 255).

November 25, 1663, Baltus Barents to the same effect (CDM, 256).

November 25, 1663, Jan Strycker, to the same purport (CDM, 256).

November 20, 1663, Declaration of Jan Cornelis Buys of Midwout, father of the deceased boy, forgiving Cornelis Jansen [Vanderver] for the above accident (CDM, 256).

November 20, 1663, Declaration of Jan Aertsen Van der Bilt, Thys Lubertsen, Gerrit Lubbertsen, relatives of Jan Cornelis Buys, forgiving Cornelis Jansen [Vanderveer] for the accidental killing of the above lad (CDM, 256).

November 29, 1663. Order on the above petition, allowing Cornelis Jansen [Vanderveer] freedom from arrest for three months to establish his innocence (see post Vol. 10, Part III, p. 12) (CDM, 256).

January 10, 1664. Petition of Cornelis Jansen [Vanderveer] from Alakmaer, now of Midwout, praying a pardon for the accidental manslaughter he committed (CDM, 258).

These above-cited articles taken as a whole show that Jan Cornelis Buys and Jan Damen were one and the same person.

The child accidentally killed was 8 years old in 1663 and hence was born in 1655-6. From BDC, I:41 we have the item: "Lubbert, son of Jan Corn Buys and Ybetje Lubberts was baptized. Sponsors: Jan Damen [i.e. Jan Jansen Damen, the uncle and adopted father of the child's father] and Pietertje de Ruyter." This child Lubbert was undoubtedly the child that was accidentally killed.

RNA, 11:93 gives us the following item:

May 1, 1656, Jan Corns Buys, alias Jan Damen and Lubbens Gysbertsen, widow, request permission to tap, as they have been driven from their houses by the last trouble with. the Indians. Whereon is endorsed :?Petitioner's request is granted like others.

This item shows that Jan Cornelis Buys had the alias of Jan Damen and corroborates the statement in the will of Jan Jansen Damen and the items concerning the accidental killing.

In the RECORD, 47:163 there appears what seems to be a satisfactorily correct abstract of the joint will of Jan Cornelis Buys and his third and last wife Willemtje Tyssen. The original of this will was written in Dutch and the original will is said to be recorded in Liber I, 203 of Conveyances and the English translation in Liber 1:75 of Conveyances. The English translation is very poorly expressed and the following may be said to be an abstract thereof containing all essential testamentary facts:

Will of Jan Buys and Willemtie Tyssen of Breucklyn in Kings County [who were then husband and wife]. The will being a joint will [and written in preparation for the death of either one or of both]. Dated November 29, 1686, and proved January 28,1689-90. Half of whole estate to children procured [by the testator] by Ebye Lubberse [his first wife], Femmetje Janse [the testator's second wife] and Willemtje Thyssen [the testator's third and last wife and the joint testatrix], and the children procured by Roelof Willemse [the first husband of Willemtje Thyssen the joint testatrix] in equal shares. Children of Willemtie Thyssen [by Roelof Willemse]: Machtiltie and Willem Roelofse. Hillitie and Thys Buys, children of the joint testators. To Willem Roeloffse, 100 guilders, wampum. Residue of whole estate to children of the testators [i.e. children of Jan Cornelis Buys and Willemtje Thyssen]. Witnesses: Jeronimus Rapale, Hendrick Sleght.

signed Jan Buys
and by the mark set by Willemtie Tyssen

This will being in Dutch, after the same was translated into English and the witnesses were sworn, it was ordered recorded by the Court of Sessions held for this County (Kings) the 28 day of January 1689-90.

This will shows that Jan Cornelis Buys and his third wife Willemtie Thyssen were both alive on November 29, 1686, and that either one or presumably both were dead on January 28, 1689-90.

JAN CORNELIS BUYS married as his first wife IDA (YBE, YBETJE or EYBE) LUBBERTZE, the date of this marriage was early enough for him to have a child born to him by Eybe Lubbertse and baptized November 3, 1652 (BDC, I:33). EYBE LUBBERTSE died prior to August 24, 1663 (Brkn. :141), as on that date "Jan Corneliszen Buys married his second wife Femmetje Jans"?as will later be shown. The parentage of Eybe Lubbertse is not at present determined.

From Liber D. p. 283, Flatbush Town Records we obtain the following item:

Jan Cornelisz Buys, widower of Eeybe Lubbers, deceased, on April 24, 1668 A.D., declares that on that date he had the following named surviving children begotten by the aforesaid Eeybe Lubbers deceased, viz.:?Corneles, Henderickyen, Tryntigen, Diefverien and Nelien, over whom Jan Vanderbyldt and Gerrit Lubbersz were appointed guardians.

(See also RECORD, 47:163.)

Note that in the list of his children by Eeybe Lubbers, living on April 24, 1668, no mention is made of a child named Lubberts.

* * *

JAN CORNELIS BUYS married as his second wife FEMMETJE JANS: "August 24, 1663 Jan Corneliszen Buys, widower of Ybe Lubberts was married to Femmetje Jans, widow of Teunis Nysse. Married at Middelwoud with letters from Breuckelen" (Brkn., 141). Femmetje Jans died and was buried in the Flatbush Church, December 13, 1666 (Flat. Frost, Burials:16). We have no record of baptism of any child of Jan Cornelis Buys by his second wife Femmetje Jans. The records, however, seem to indicate that he had at least one child by her. In the joint will of Jan Cornelis Buys and his third and last wife Willemtje Thyssen we have the following quoted item in which Jan Cornelis Buys refers to his children, "procured by Eybe Lubberse, Femmetje Jans and Willemtie Thyssen.["] We have baptismal records of his children by Eybe Lubbertse, and his children by Willemtie Thyssen are mentioned by name in the will and we have baptismal record of one of them. Therefore it seems that on November 29, 1686?the date of the will?there must have been living issue of Jan Cornelis Buys by Femmetje Jans. It is for this reason that we ascribe . . . [Jacob Janse Buys] to the mother Femmetje Jans, and this child must have been born between August 24, 1663, and December 13, 1666.

* * *

JAN CORNELIS BUYS married as his third wife on some date between December 13, 1666, and January 14, 1674, WILLEMTJE THYSSEN, widow of Roelof Willemszen.
From KCo, 389 we obtain the following items:

["]ROELOF WILLEMSE from Beverwyck (Albany) married WILLEMTIEN _____. They were members of the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, in 1663."

"ROELOF WILLEMSE married WILLEMTJE TYSON after 1663, and she married as her second husband JAN CORNELIS BUYS. ROELOF WILLEMSE died prior to 1686. They had the following-named children: Roelof and Machteltje Roelofse."

ROELOF WILLEMSE and WILLEMTJE THYSSEN had 3 children two of whom are mentioned in the joint will of Jan Cornelis Buys and Willemtje Thyssen made November 29, 1686, and the other, whose name is given by KCo. 389; and his name is not mentioned in the will of 1686, hence he was either dead on that date, or KCo. is in error in having recorded him.

From Flat. 134 we obtain the following item: "December 25, 1684. Wilhelmus, son of Landolphus Evans and Margriet Bleuw was baptized. Sponsor: Willemtie Thyssen." This was apparently the last appearance of Willemtje Thyssen on the church records. 
BUYS, Jan Cornelis (I11975)
 
25245 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), pp. 232-233:

Neeltje Janse Buys, who married (1) June 23, 1684, as is here shown: "Banns published June 1, 1684 between Jan Harmens, j.m. from Gerder in Gelderland and Neeltje Jans Buys from Midwout, L. Island, and were married June 23, 1684, in the presence of the Court and congregation of Bergen by R. Van Giesen." Jan Hermens (Coerten) died prior to 1699 (REC., 56:267, 269). Neeltje Jans Buys married a second time on April 8, 1699, as per the following item: "April 8, 1699, Siaque (Jacob or Jacques) Vigoor, widower of Catryn Pisiaer and Neeltje Buys, widow of Jan Koerte [i.e. Jan Harmense Coerten] were married" (Hack., 26). Neeltje Jans Buys was married a third time to Jan Stratenmaker (or Straetenmaker) as his second wife: "January 12, 1707, Jan Straetenmaker, widower of Geesje [Gerritse] and Neeltje Buys, widow of Jacob Vigoor were here (Hackensack) on February __ 1707 united in wedlock" (Hack., 30). BgnM:159 gives this item: "January 12, 1707 were betrothed Jan Straetmaker (widower of Geesje Van Steenwyck) and Neeltje Buys (widow of Jacob Vygoor); received certificate January 27, 1707 and were married by Domine Bertolf." The first wife of Jan Straetmaker was, according to BgnM, 2, Geesje Gerrits: January 14, 1666, "Jan Dirckse Straetmaker, y.m. and Geesje Gerritse, y.d. were married." Geesje Gerritse died February 11, 1700, and was buried with the pall" (BgnD :162) .

Children of Neeltje Janse Buys and Jan Hermans Coerten (or Koerten) :

1. Aertje Coerten, "daughter of Jan Hermense and Neeltje Jans was baptized April 6, 1686. Sponsors: Jan Cornelis Buys and Reyckje Hermenz" (BgnB:155). This child died in early childhood.

2. Jan Coerten, "son of Jan Koerte and Neeltie Beus [i.e. Buys] was baptized ____ 1686 [month and day date not given]. Sponsors: Cornelis and Hendricktie Verwey" (Hack., 74). He may have been the "Jan Koerte, y.m. who on April 8, 1771, married Marytie Ariaense, y.d.?both born and living at Ackuiggenonck" (Hack., 34).

3. Aertjes Coerten, 2nd, daughter of Jan Hermensen and Neeltje Jans was baptized April 4, 1692. Sponsors: Hessel Pieterse, Elizabeth Eleysbeth" (BgnB :235) .

Children of Neeltje Janse Buys and Jacob Vigoor. None that are known of.

Children of Jacob Vigoor and his first wife Catryn Pisiaer 2.

"Jacob and Maria Vigoor children of Siaques Vigoor and Catreyn Vigoor were baptized May 1, 1689 by Domine Rodolphus Varick."

Children of Neeltje Jans Buys and Jan Dircksen Stratemaker. None that are known of.

Children of Jan Dirckse Stratenmaker and Geesje Gerritse:

1. Jannetje Straetmaker, "daughter of Jan Straetmaker and Geesje Gerrits baptized December 26, 1666. Sponsors: Casparus Steynmets with his wife _____ (BgnB:8).

2. Annetje Straetmaker, "daughter of Jan Straetmaker and Geesje Gerrits baptized February 17, 1669. Sponsors: Guert Gerrits and Janetje Edsall" (BgnB, 26).

3. Gerrit Straetmaker, "son of Jan Straetmaker and Geesje Gerrits baptized October 2, 1676. Sponsors: Jacob Cornelis and Annetje Steynmets, y.m." (BgnB. 41). 
BUYS, Neeltje Janse (I12663)
 
25246 (1) Totten, John Reynolds, "Jan Cornelis Buys (alias Jan Damen) and His Three Wives," New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 66 (1935), pp. 234-236:

FEMMMETJE JANS, also known as PHAEBEA FAELIX (PHEBE FELIX), was the daughter of John Seals, an Englishman from Devonshire - he was also known as Jan Celes by the Dutch of New Netherland, as per early Dutch records. John Seals married Maria Robberts (or Robertson), and Femmetje Jans was their only known child. John Seals died in 1645. He made his will April 7, 1645, in which he left one half of his estate to his son-in-law Teunis Nyssen, and the other half to his wife as long as she remained his widow or until her death if she did not re-marry. She married her second husband Thomas Gridy (or Grydy) on August 9, 1645, as per MDC, 13: "August 9, 1645 were betrothed Thomas Grydy, wedr van Janneken Isaacs, en Mary Robbertszen, Wede van Jan Selis." This Thomas Grydy was 60 years of age at this marriage and a resident of Gravesend (Bergen Gen.:99). KCo: 94 states incorrectly that Femmetje Jans at the time of her marriage to Teunis Nyssen, was the widow of Hendrick the Boor. The record, however, of her marriage to Teunis Nyssen (MDC:10) shows that she was then a young maiden.

From Brkn:148 we obtain the following item: "December 23, 1663. Tryntie, daughter of Fyte Siercks and Jannetie Teunis of Breuckelen was baptized. Sponsors: Jan Buys and Femmetje Jans." These sponsors were man and wife and the name of the wife shows that Femmetje Jans, second wife of Jan Cornelis Buys, was alive as late as December 13, 1663.

The marriage of Femmetje Jans to her first husband is thus recorded: "February 11, 1640 Theunis Nyssen, j.m. van Bunninck int. sticht Van Uytr en Phaebea Faelix j.d. van Jarleston in Englt." (MDC:10).

Children of TEUNIS NYSSEN (or DENYSE) and FEMIETJE JANS:

i. Jannetje Teunise, "baptized December 22, 1641, daughter of Theunis Nyssen. Sponsors: Michiel ter heyken, fiscael; Rachel Vynen, Petronel Lapolt" (BDC, 1:12). She married Jan Hansen Bergen (KCo. 39 and 94). She and her husband were members of the Dutch Church, Brooklyn (Stiles Brkn., I:426).

ii. Marritje Teunise, "baptized April 3, 1644, daughter of Theunis Nyssen. No sponsors" (BDC, 1:17). She married Dirck Janse Woertman (KCo., 94 and 392).

iii. Annetje Teunise, "baptized February 18, 1646, daughter of Theunis Nyssen. Sponsors: Jan Jansen Dam, Heyltie Joris, Wychtie Aerts" (BDC, 1:20). She married Hieronymus Rapalie (KCo., 94 and 233). They were members of the Dutch Church, Brooklyn, and resided at the ferry (Stiles Brkn., 1:427).

iv. Elsje Teunise, "baptized May 10, 1648, daughter of Theunis Nyssen. Sponsors: Barent Bal and Elsje Pieters" (BDC, 1:24). She married December __ 1669, Gerrit Snediker (KCo., 94 and 267; REC., 47: 170 and 227).

v. Femmetje Teunise, "baptized April 3, 1650, daughter of Teunis Nyssen. No sponsors" (BDC, 1:27). She married Michael Hansen Bergen" (KCo., 32, 34 and 94). They were both members of the Dutch Church, Brooklyn (Stiles Brkn., 1:427).

vi. Denys (or Dionys) Teunise, "baptized April 12, 1654, Nys, son of Theunis Nyssen. Sponsors: Jan Evertsen Bout, Albert Corneliszen Wantenaer, Willem Bredenbent, Mr. Paulus Van der Beeck, Aeltie Cornelis and Grietje Jans" (BDC, 1:37). He married (1) Elizabeth Polhemus (daughter of Rev. Johannes Theodorus Polhemus and Catharina Van Werven (KCo. 226-27); married (2) Helena Cortelyou, daughter of Jacques Cortelyou and the widow of Nicholas Van Brunt (KCo. 93-94, 227, 275, and 311).

vii. Jan Teunise, "baptized April 12, 1654, son of Theunis Nyssen. Same sponsors as those of his twin brother Denys above recorded (BDC, 1:37). He married November 16, 1679, Catalina Bogaert, daughter of Teunis Gysbertse Bogaert, and his first wife Sara Jorise Rapalie (KCo.:41, 93-94).

viii. Cornelis Teunise, who was a minor in 1667. He married (1) August 27, 1687, Neeltje Bogaert, daughter of Teunis Gysbertse Bogaert and Sara Joris Rapalie; he m. (2) Rebecca _____ (KCo.:41, 92-94).

TEUNIS NYSSEN also possibly had the following-named children:

ix.[?] Aertje Teunise (KCo.:94).

x.[?] Teunis Teunise (supposedly), who married (1) Geertje (or Geesje) Hendricks and m. (2) Susanna _____ (KCo., 94).

xi.[?] James Teunise (supposedly), who was of the Raritan (KCo. 94).

xii.[?] Joris Teunise (supposedly), who married Femmetje _____ (KCo., 94).

From Liber D:225 (REC., 47:163) we see that on June 8, 1667, Jan Cornelis Buys declares in the presence of the overseers - Adriaen Ryerse and Derick Jansen - that Femmetien Jans, deceased had the following surviving children (obviously minor children) by Teunes Niessen, deceased: who are by name: Eelsyen Tuenes, Femmetien, Jan, Denis and Corneles Tuenesen, over whom were installed as guardians Adriaen Ryerse and Derck Jansz. Jan Cornelis Buys then and there gave assurance that each of these named children's rights should be guaranteed to the satisfaction of the overseers named.

This bond in its wording is inaccurate as to the facts of the case, for the children named are recorded as surviving children, which in itself suggests that all the other children of Teunis Nyssen were deceased on June 8, 1667. The obvious meaning was that these named children were the surviving minor children of Teunis Nyssen and Femmetje Jans, which interpretation is in accordance with the records of baptisms of said children.

(2) According to the record of her marriage to Teunis NYSSEN, Phaebea FAELIX was from "Jarleston, in Engelt." The compiler has been unable to locate a populated place named "Jarleston" in present-day England. However, Phaebea's father, John SEALS, is believed to have been born in Devon, England, and there is a small village there named Charleton. 
FAELIX, Phaebea (I12617)
 
25247 (1) Tracey, Grace L. & Dern, John P., Pioneers of Old Monocacy: The Early Settlement of Frederick County, Maryland, 1721-1743, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987, p. 87:

John Littler was a business partner of James Wright. He kept a tavern in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1729-1730, where his records in 1731 show "he is going away." His daughter married Alexander Ross.

(2) O'Dell, Cecil, Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia, Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing Company, 1995, pp. 193-195:

LITTLER

John Littler (b. 28 May 1708) was the son of Samuel and Rachel Taylor Littler. He was taxed in East Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania, for the years 1728 through 1729. Samuel and Rachel Taylor (widow of Thomas Taylor, and daughter of John Minshall of Great Britain) were married on 31 July 1707 at Middletown Meeting House. Their other children were: sons Joshua (b. March 1710), Samuel (b. February 1712/13), Minshell (b. April 1718); daughters Rachel (b. October 1715) and Sarah (b. August 1721).

John (son of Samuel, deceased) and Mary Ross (daughter of Alexander Ross) were married on 5 June 1728 at the Quaker Meeting House in Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania with the following witnesses:

Elisha Gatchel
James Langley
John Gartrell
Jerimiah Bronn
Nathaniel Pennek
Henry Renolds
Jacob Haines
Arthur Barrett
John Everett
Thomas Brown Jr.
Jacob Beals
John Taylor
Joshua Litteler
Aurthur Barrett
Thomas Barrett
John Barrett
Samuell Litteler
Elizabeth Abrill
Hannah Abrill
Richard Abrill
William Cronn
Thomas Charleton
Alex Ross
Catherine Ross
Rachel Litteler
Lidia Ross
John Ross
George Ross
Simeon Taylor
Stephen Ailes

On 3 July 1728, John's sister Rachel married Thomas Oldham at Nottingham Public Meeting, Chester County, Pennsylvania with these witnesses:

John Littler
Thos. Oldham
John Minshall
Mary Littler
Allexan. Ross
Mary Oldham
Joshua Littler
Mary Gowles
Sam Littler
Susana Oldham
William Smith
John Walter
Martha Walter
Jane Smith
Christen Musgrove
Elizabeth Musgrove
John Hyet
Mary Leonard
Roger Dyer
George Leonard
Moses Musgrove
Aron Musgrove
Robt Green
Ann Green
Wm Hyet
Katherine Leonard
Mary Woodrow
Rachell Moor
Margret Miller
Hannah Jones
Jane Jones
Mary Pierce
Mary Miller
Mary Jones
Morgan Jones
Caleb Pierce
Andrew Moore
Andrew Baxter
Samuell Miller
David Nickols
Sam Jones
Frances Jones
Isaac Woodrow
Samuell Jones

John and Mary were in Virginia by 1731 where, on 17 October 1734, John had Robert Brooke survey 1,085 acres southeast of the present-day town of Clearbrook; Stephenson, Virginia is located within the southwest part of the tract. . . . Frederick County Highways 664, 666, 761, 836 and U.S. Highway 11 cross through sections of the land. 177 He received a patent from the Colony for it on 12 November 1735.

On 13 November 1734, John also had a 448-acre tract surveyed which he sold to Thomas Rees and Henry Bowen on 25 and 30 January 1743/44. . . . Two days later, on 15 November 1734, John (together with James Wright) had 438 acres surveyed. John then sold his half (219 acres) to John Cheadle. . . . On 28 November 1734, John and Isaac Perkins had a tract of land containing 300 acres surveyed; it became a part of Stephen Hollingsworth's 470-acre patent land. On 25 October 1737, John sold 200 acres of his 1,085-acre patent land to Richard Jones for seven pounds. Jones sold the 200 acres to Lewis Neill, Gent., in 1748.

John Littler was deceased by 6 December 1748 when his will (written 30 August 1748) was proved in Frederick County Court. He devised 200 acres (of his old plantation . . . ) to each of his sons: Samuel, John and Nathan Littler. He devised another 100 acres to an unborn child, whether son or daughter, and the remainder of the 1,085 acres was to be sold. To Rachel Littler (daughter of his brother Samuel) he devised 30 pounds. The mills, mill seat and mill waterways on the 1,085-acre patent land were to be sold. His wife Mary was the executor of the estate. As executrix of the will, Mary sold 187 acres of the patent land on 13 May 1751 to John Jones for 50 pounds.

John and Mary had moved from the patent land (c. 1740) to a 421-acre tract of land about one mile northwest at present-day Brucetown, Virginia. John left this land to Mary in his will. On 3 April 1753, she received a Fairfax grant for the 421 acres (surveyed in 1751). She sold the 421 acres in three pieces: 16 acres to David Gilkey on 1 March 1754; 150 acres to Edward Dodd for 40 shillings on 21 October 1754; and 255 acres on the west side of the Waggon Road (Braddocks Road, Frederick County Highway 667) to George Bruce for 200 pounds on 1 June 1761. Brucetown is in the southernmost part of this tract with most of the land situated north of Brucetown.

Mary also received two Fairfax grants for land about 1?? miles east of the 1,085-acre patent land on the Opequon Creek. One tract of 168 acres lay adjacent Simeon Taylor, Rutherford?s Road (Frederick County Highway 761), Hugh Haynes and Robert Hutchings; it was surveyed in 1754 with a grant issued on 2 February 1763. The other tract of 499 acres, adjacent north of the 168-acre grant, was situated on Littler's Mill Run, (Clearbrook Run), adjacent Joseph Carter, Bryan Bruin and George Bruce; it was surveyed in 1765 with a grant issued on 6 August 1767.

On 4 March 1765, Mary sold 148 acres of the 168-acre grant land to Isaac Johnson for 20 pounds. She split the 499-acre grant land into two sales: a 257-acre section sold to Mathias Gossett for 200 pounds on 7 November 1769 and the remaining 239-acre section sold to Nathaniel Red for 70 pounds on 3 May 1771.

Mary died shortly after the last land sale; and sometime before November 1771 when the Frederick County Court appraisement of her estate was returned. On 15 February 1795, Mary's estate settlement was concluded with amounts paid to her sons Samuel Littler and Nathan Littler, to Catherine Jones (probably her daughter), to Robert Bull (probably a son-in-law), and to George Bruce (probably a son-in-law). Catherine Jones received 17 pounds and all the others received 15 pounds, 2 shillings and 4 pence.

Samuel Littler and his wife Elizabeth sold 75 acres of the 1,085-acre patent land that he had inherited from his father John to George Ross on 20 December 1759 for 100 pounds, and another 6?? acres of the willed land to Stephen Ross for 20 pounds.

(3) Frederick County, Virginia, Hopewell Friends History [database online], Orem, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997:

In the State Land Office at Richmond are to be found recorded in Book 16, pages 315-415, inclusive, the patents issued to the settlers who came to the Shenandoah Valley under authority of the Orders in Council made to Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan. All bear date of November 12, 1735, and recite that the grantee is one of the seventy families brought in by them, and excepting location and acreage, are alike in wording and conditions, and are signed by William Gooch, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony at that time. . . .

These patents were issued under the seal of the colony and were grants from the Crown, free of any obligation of feudal services to the Fairfax family, who claimed the land as lords proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia. The sixth Lord Fairfax, who later established his home at Greenway Court near Winchester, instituted many suits against early settlers in the Shenandoah Valley, but it does not appear that any Friend who claimed under Ross and Bryan was ever ejected from his land.

Although it is specifically stated that seventy families have been "by them brought in to our said Colony and settled upon the Lands in the said Order mentioned," only thirty-six patents issued to thirty-four grantees have been found. The names of these grantees are here given, together with sundry information gathered from the minutes of various Friends' meetings, from the records of the counties of Orange and Frederick in Virginia, and Chester County, Pennsylvania. . . .

John Littler, 1332 acres in his own name, and 438 acres in partnership with James Wright. The first-named tract lies five miles north of Winchester, and here John Littler first established his home, on the stream first called Yorkshireman's Branch, and then Littler's Run. In 1728 he married at Nottingham, Chester County, Pa., Mary, daughter of Alexander and Catherine Ross. In 1729/30 John Littler was living in Nottingham, and kept a public house in his dwelling, Alexander Ross being his bondsman. The Chester County Tavern License Papers, Vol. II, No. 60, contain the following petition indicative of John Littler's removal to Virginia:

To the Onerable Cort of qurtersessions to be heald at Chester ye Last tuesday in August for ye sd County 1731.

Your Peticioner humbly Shueth, Whereas John Littler having had a Lisens from this Coart to keep Publick house he now is going Away and your Peticioner Living upon ye same Road Joyning to ye sd Littler having a Mind to Keep Publick house for ye Entertainment of travellers or all Such as Stands in Need your Peticioner humbly Desires yt this Onerable Coart would Greant Me A Lisenes for ye Same which I hope Shall be Preformed with as Good Rule and Order as ye Law derects in Shuch a Case.
And your humbel Peticioner will be very Much ablidgs to this Onorable Coart.

The humbel Peticion of Thomas Hughes.

It is gratifying to know that this labored effort on the part of Thomas Hughes was successful, the petition being granted by the court. John Littler also kept tavern at his new home in Virginia, on the plantation which he named "Rocktown," and also operated thereon a grist mill and sawmill. About 1740 he moved to a tract of land about four miles northeast and established a new home, leaving the old home in the possession of his sons. The new home, where he operated grist mills, sawmills, and carding and fulling mills, he named "New Design." This place eventually became the village of Brucetown, and after his death Mary, his widow, continued to operate his various enterprises until her death in 17__.

John Littler was a man of great energy and enterprise, and amassed what was in his day a very considerable fortune. He frequently appears in the Frederick County records, in various business transactions, and as being by the court intrusted with laying out new roads and altering and improving old ones. His will is dated August 30, 1748, and was probated December 6, 1748; so he must have died between these dates. He mentions his sons Samuel, John, and Nathan, and also provides for an expected child; makes a bequest to his niece Rachel, daughter of his brother Samuel, and appoints his wife executrix and Joseph Lupton, John Milbourn, and Evan Thomas Junr. executors. Only his wife qualified, with George Ross and Evan Thomas as sureties.

Mary Littler seems to have been a successful business woman, and among other activities operated a tavern, which entertained the officers of General Braddock's army on May 3, 1755. The diary of Mrs. Brown, a nurse with the detachment of sick following Braddock's army, has the following entries for June 7 and 8, 1755:

At 4 we began to march. Left Mr. Falkner behind, who did not choose to March with an empty stomach. Great Gusts of Rain. My Wagon and every thing in it wet, and all the Sick almost drown'd. At 4 we halted at my Friend Laittler's who bid me Wellcome, but had no whiskey which was the Soldier's first enquiry; for they were still in the Opinion that they could not live without it. We now live high, had for Dinner a Qr. of Lamb and a pye, to drink, my Friend's temperate Liquor--Spring Water. I spent the Evening very agreeable; Mr. Falkner favored me with several Tunes on his Flute. Chatted till 10 and then retired.

June 8th -

I slept but poorly, laying on a deal Feather Bed. Having had no sleep for 2 Nights did not hear the Drum. We march'd at 4. At 9 we halted at my Friend Bellinger's who bid me wellcome. My Brother set off for Winchester, 8 m off, But Mr. Falkner said he would do himself the Pleasure of staying with Me. We spent the Day very agreeably; had for Dinner some Veal and Greens, to drink french Wine, and for Supper Milk Punch.

Mary Littler left no will, but the appraisement of her personal estate, amounting to 505 pounds, 16 shillings, and 10 pence, a large sum for that time, was made by an order of Frederick County court, November term, 1771. The appraisers were John Rees, Thomas McClunn, and Richard Carter.

The lands of John Littler remained in the possession of his descendants for over 100 years, but passed to other hands when the owners joined the migration to the West. The large stone mansion-house built on the "Rocktown" plantation by Nathan, grandson of John Littler, is one of the show places of Frederick County. Some years ago the name was changed to "Kenilworth" when it was acquired by the Stephenson family. The last home of John Littler, "New Design," with its mills and tavern, has become the village of Brucetown. Nearly on the site of his house stands the residence now occupied by Mr. O. F. Snapp, and known as the "Tanquary House." Littler's Tavern stood a few hundred yards west, on the Braddock Road, and is now the property of the Timberlake estate.
 
LITTLER, John (I9729)
 
25248 (1) Tracey, Grace L. & Dern, John P., Pioneers of Old Monocacy: The Early Settlement of Frederick County, Maryland, 1721-1743, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987, p. 87:

John Willson, Nathaniel Thomas, John Haitt, Jr., John Peteate, George Robinson, Robert Luna, Luke Emelen, Francis Pincher, John Frost, George Hobson and John Calvert were other Quakers who moved through Maryland to Pennsylvania. [Note: Should this read "from Pennsylvania through Maryland."?]

(2) O'Gorman, Ella Foy, Descendants of Virginia Calverts, Los Angeles, CA: 1979, pp. 611-612:

CALVERTS OF FREDERICK CO., VA.

6201. John CALVERT

b. prob in Pa.; d. June. 1739, in what is now Frederick Co., Va.: m. JANE _____.

On Nov. 12th, 1735, the State of Virginia granted John Calvert 850 acres of land, beginning at two white oaks and a hickory near Abraham Hollingsworth's line. (Land Office, Richmond, Va., Book 16, p. 394.) This land was located in what is now Frederick County, Va., east of the village of Kernstown, which is a few miles southwest of the town of Winchester.

It is possible that this John Calvert and Abraham Hollingsworth were from Pennsylvania, as we find at the Friends Monthly Meeting, April 4, 1687, mention is made of a difference between Thomas Hollingsworth and John Calvert about dividing their lands in Upper Providence. The record goes on to say that Valentine Hollingsworth, father of Thomas, married for his second wife, Ann Calvert, daughter of Thomas Calvert; and John Calvert (of the "difference") was probably her brother. This John Calvert was buried 7th mo., 23, 1699. His wife was Judith and they had a son Daniel, who was born in this country, 5, 6, 1685. At a court held the 6th mo., 25, 1702, the sheriff made return of an execution on the estate of John Calvert, which was sold to Thomas and Joshua Calvert for ??243. These two Calverts were probably elder sons of John, born before coming to this country.

The Hopewell's Friends History of Frederick County, Va., 1734-1934, on p. 205, also mentions Valentine Hollingsworth, born about 1632, in Parish of Sego, County of Armagh, Ireland (son of Henry and Catherine Hollingsworth), m. Apr. 12, 1672, as his second wife, Ann Calvert, daughter of Thomas and Jane Calvert.

The will of John Calvert dated 2nd October, 1738; proved 28th June, 1739; recorded in Orange County, Va., Book 1, p. 90; (What is now Frederick County, Va., was then included in Orange county, Va.), calls himself of the Colony of Virginia, and county of Orange, and wills his wife Jane Calvert one-third of all his lands, during her life. To his sons Robert and Isaiah the remainder of land, 850 acres, whereon John Stephens now lives; to daughter Margaret, 300 acres of land called Hogg Run. To Rebecca and Ann Calvert, 200 acres each. To son Richard Calvert the remainder of 992 acres at the death of his mother. To wife Jane Calvert my young mare 2 yrs old, with bald face, and the old mare. To son Robert Calvert the gray horse. To son Isaiah Calvert his choice of horses. To niece Elizabeth Carey or Cory, the brindle cow and calf. To daughters Margery, Rebecca and Ann a mare each. Rest of the estate to the children. Sons Robert and Isaiah Calvert executors. Witnesses, Terence Motley and Henry Jones.

Hugh Parral owned 466 acres adjoining the land of John Calvert. He may have married John's daughter Ann Calvert, as his will probated Oct. 5, 1748, mentions his wife Ann, his sons Daniel, Joseph and John; his kinsmen John Bruce, his son Edward, daughter Christiana "not yet of age," and his cousin (which frequently meant "nephew"), Robert Calvert.

ISSUE OF JOHN AND JANE (_____) CALVERT:

6202+ i. Robert Calvert b. prob. abt. 1715; m. Mary _____.

6203 ii. Isaiah Calvert b. prob. 1718; d. 1748. Letters of adm. granted Robert Calvert. (Order Book B, p. 3, Frederick Co., Va.

6204 iii. Margaret Calvert b. abt. 1721.

6205 iv. Rebecca Calvert b. abt. 1723.

6206 v. Ann Calvert b. prob. abt. 1725; perhaps m. Hugh Parrell.

6207+ vi. Richard Calvert b. abt. 1727; m. Sarah _____.

Frederick County,. Va., Records.

(3) O'Dell, Cecil, Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia, Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing Company, 1995, pp. 251-254:

CALVERT

John Calvert was in the present-day Winchester area of Virginia before 25 November 1732 when he had Robert Brooke survey 750 acres of land on "Red Bud Bottom." . . . This was Brooke's third survey in 1732 for land within the original boundaries of Frederick County, Virginia. This land is served by Virginia Highway 7 on the south with Frederick County Highway 661 running just north of the north line. The southernmost point is Woodstock Lane, west of Interstate Highway 81. A branch of Abrams Creek is on the south and Redbud Run is on the north (both waterways are branches of Opequon Creek) while Interstate 81 crosses the middle of this tract. John and his wife Jane lived on the north section of the tract. . . .

John was deceased by 28 June 1739 when his will (dated 2 October 1738) was proved in Orange County Court. He willed one-third of all his lands (to be taken out of the 750-acre tract) within the Colony of Virginia to his wife Jane . . . . At Jane's death, their youngest daughters Rebecca and Ann Calvert were to receive 200 acres each out of the lower end of the 750 acres. . . . He willed the remainder of the 750 acres to his son Richard.

On 25 November 1753, John Baylis surveyed the 750-acre tract on the "east side of Great Waggon Road" (Smithfield Avenue) for Richard, Rebecka and Ann Calvert. Rebeckah and Ann Calvert sold their 400-acre portion to Robert Rutherford in 1757. On 31 December 1757, Baylis made a second survey to partition the tract into a 400-acre section for Rutherford. (. . . Northern Neck Grant K-102) Richard Calvert received a 352-acre grant for this land from Lord Fairfax on 10 April 1760. . . .

John Calvert willed 300 acres (the lower part of an 850-acre tract surveyed by Robert Brooke on 31 October 1734) to his daughter Margaret. He willed the remainder of this tract to sons Robert and Isaiah Calvert. He had not yet received his 850-acre patent from the Colony of Virginia . . . at the time his will was dated. The patent was issued on 12 November 1735 at Williamsburg, Virginia. John Steavenson was living on the 850 acres when Calvert died. John's wife Jane Calvert, sons Robert and Isaiah and "friend and brother" William McMahan were appointed executors of the estate. Jane Calvert was probably married to John Steavenson by 23 May 1740 when she signed the return of John Calvert's inventory (appraisal) to the Orange County Court as "Jane Steavenson," three other executors also signed the document.

The 850-acre patent land . . . would encompass the southwest loop of Interstate 81/U.S. Highway 522/U.S. Highway 17/50 interchange at Winchester. The north line runs from that point southeast along present-day U.S. Highway 17/50, a distance of 240 poles (3,960 feet or ¾ mile). From there, the tract continues southwest across U.S. Highway 522, north of County Highway 645 to a point near the head of Buffalo Lick Run and Interstate 81. It runs on the east side of 1-81 across County Highway 644/Papermill Road and then southwest across I-81 to Hoge Run. It extends northwest along County Road 652, then north on the east side of Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to U.S. Highway 17/50/522. Hoge Run, Buffalo Lick Run and Sulphur Spring Run (all branches of Opequon Creek) flow through this tract.

Robert Calvert was instructed by his father's will to allocate a section of the 850 acres for Terrence Kelly, according to agreement. On 23 June 1739, Robert complied by selling 250 (215) acres to Kelly for 50 pounds. Kelly then sold the 250 acres to Thomas Rutherford on 23 January 1739/40 for nine pounds; Kelly also sold 400 acres to Rutherford at the same time. Rutherford, in turn, sold the 215 (250) acres to William Glover on 28 April 1742 for 27 pounds. This land is located on the east side of the main road from Potomack (River) to Just Hyte's (Jost Hite). . . . "Robert Wilson and Mary his wife late Mary Calvert Relict of Robert Calvert dec'd., Isaiah Calvert Eldest son and heir at Law of said Robert, and Margaret his wife of County of Frederick (sold on 16 June 1780) to Nicholas Airheart late of Lancaster County in State of Pennsylvania... (for) eight Thousand pounds all their residue in a tract of Land which was granted to John Calvert dec'd. by Patent form [sic] the Crown Situate in County of Frederick and containing eight hundred and fifty acres after deducting 215 acres which was taken and conveyed to William Glover and 206 acres which was conveyed to Samuel Calvert. By a survey made by Richard Rigg there appears to be but 327 acres. . . . Mary & Margaret wives of within named Robert & Isaiah release Dower right."

Richard Calvert received a Fairfax grant on 10 May 1755 for 400 acres of land adjacent west of his 352-acre land . . . , and adjacent southeast of William McMachen's 1,000-acre land. On 3 August 1762, he and his wife Sarah sold 2½ acres to Benjamin Blackburn for five pounds. This 2½ acres was part of the 400-acre tract which Fairfax granted to Blackburn (surveyed on 10 May 1753). The same tract was previously surveyed in 1734 for John Calvert as part of a 992-acre survey and given to Robert, by will. Blackburn bought the 400 acres from Robert Calvert at the time of the survey in 1753. This land is located on Redbud Run, a branch of Opequon Creek, and "the Waggon Road whereon said Blackburn now lives." Richard and Sarah Calvert sold the 352-acre inherited land . . . to Robert Rutherford for 350 pounds on 5 February 1768.

Richard was deceased by 7 August 1770 when his will (dated 22 February 1770) was proved in Frederick County Court. His wife Sarah, two sons John and Robert Calvert and daughter Jean Calvert are listed in the Will.

(4) Frederick County, Virginia, Hopewell Friends History [database online], Orem, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997:

In the State Land Office at Richmond are to be found recorded in Book 16, pages 315-415, inclusive, the patents issued to the settlers who came to the Shenandoah Valley under authority of the Orders in Council made to Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan. All bear date of November 12, 1735, and recite that the grantee is one of the seventy families brought in by them, and excepting location and acreage, are alike in wording and conditions, and are signed by William Gooch, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony at that time. . . .

These patents were issued under the seal of the colony and were grants from the Crown, free of any obligation of feudal services to the Fairfax family, who claimed the land as lords proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia. The sixth Lord Fairfax, who later established his home at Greenway Court near Winchester, instituted many suits against early settlers in the Shenandoah Valley, but it does not appear that any Friend who claimed under Ross and Bryan was ever ejected from his land.

Although it is specifically stated that seventy families have been "by them brought in to our said Colony and settled upon the Lands in the said Order mentioned," only thirty-six patents issued to thirty-four grantees have been found. The names of these grantees are here given, together with sundry information gathered from the minutes of various Friends' meetings, from the records of the counties of Orange and Frederick in Virginia, and Chester County, Pennsylvania. . . .

John Calvert, 850 acres "near Abraham Hollingsworth," being the description in the patent. This land lies east of the village of Kernstown.

The will of John Calvert was probated in Orange County, Va., June 28, 1739, and mentions his wife Jane, his sons Robert, Isaiah, and Richard, his daughter Margaret, and names Rebecca and Ann as his two youngest daughters. He also makes a bequest to his niece Elizabeth Carey. The home plantation fell to his son Isaiah, and his sons Robert and Richard secured grants from Lord Fairfax in their own name, upon Red Bud Creek, in Frederick County. 
CALVERT, John (I9746)
 
25249 (1) Tracey, Grace L. and Dern, John P., Pioneers of Old Monocacy [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Clearfield Company, Inc., 2000, pp. 154-158:

The first official record found to date which shows the beginning of the German settlement in today's Frederick County [MD] is an Interesting document in Prince George's County Court records. It concerns one John George Swinehart and notes that on November 16, 1731 "at Prince George's County aforesaid John George Swinehard of Prince George's County by his certain writing obligatory acknowledged his debt to John Pawling. . . ." The record further shows that Swinehart had first settled in "Frederick Township in ye County of Philadelphia in ye Prophence of PenseIvania" where he, a "luman" [yeoman] first contracted this debt of "twelve pounds six shillens and fore pence." He appeared by his attorney in Court on June 24, 1746 and had the writing obligatory read to him. George Gabriel stood pledge and manucaptor for Swinehard, should he be convicted. But Pawling appeared by his attorney, saying "he would not further prosecute." The Court awarded Swinehard his costs.

Johann Georg Schweinhart - as his name was spelled in German - had arrived in Pennsylvania before January 8, 1725 when his daughter Magdalena was born. He thus does not appear in the Philadelphia arrival lists, which did not begin until 1727. He must have come to the area of today's Frederick County in 1731, for late in 1730 he was still in today's New Hanover Township of Montgomery [then Philadelphia] County, Pennsylvania, where he was associated with other future Monocacy settlers. On November 8, 1730, for example, Dietrich Lehnich, Balthazar Fauth and the latter's wife Susanna were sponsors at the Falckner Swamp Lutheran baptism of Joh. Georg Schweinhardt's son Joh. Peter. I. Daniel Rupp listed Schweinhart as paying quitrent on 100 acres in Frederick Township of today's Montgomery County "prior to" 1734. But in 1734 Schweinhart was definitely in Prince George's County, selling a wagon to Botus [Baltus] Fout.

We have no knowledge where in the Monocacy area Schweinhardt lived between 1731 and 1740. It is perhaps the more mystifying because on March 2, 1732/33 Charles Calvert, 5th Lord Baltimore, formally offered new settlers, foreign and native alike, free land between the Potomac and Susquehanna Rivers with title in fee simple, merely for the asking. During the ensuing three years
families of new settlers could obtain up to 200 acres and single men up to 100 acres without the usual expense of 40 shillings "caution money" per 100 acres. Even the customary annual quitrents of four shillings per 100 acres would not be due until the end of the three years. Why, then, did Schweinhardt and others like him not avail themselves of these terms? Out of Ignorance or otherwise, he turned instead to Daniel Dulany, who it can be assumed charged well for his assistance with the survey and the patent which followed.

Schweinhart's 100 acres were surveyed on November 27, 1740 and were known as "Lost Spring." This land abutted the already surveyed "Tasker's Chance" to which Dulany was shortly to acquire title. Quite possibly Schweinhart actually lived on the land before it had been surveyed. In today's terms, "Lost Spring" lay between the northern bounds of Fort Detrick and Tuscarora Creek off Yellow Springs Road. On November 21, 1743 Schweinhardt had this land resurveyed, enlarging it to 235 acres and renaming it "George and Margaret." As a result of this resurvey, a portion of Little Tuscarora Creek was included in Schweinhart's land.

George Swinehart - as he was henceforth known in English records - allowed his name to be used as a signatory to the 1742 petition to divide Prince George's Parish. He was naturalized in the Provincial Court on October 19, 1743, having taken communion from David Candler "in the Lutheran Church of Manaquice" on September 25, 1743. On March 17, 1747 he deeded 50 acres of his land to Georg Philipp Klemm at about the time the latter married his daughter Margaretha Swinehart. The balance of his land was mortgaged to Joseph Mayhew, another son-in-law and an Englishman, who in 1760 released it back to Gabriel, "son and heir of George Swinehart." Soon thereafter Gabriel Swinehard sold the remaining land to Matthias Ringer.

In 1747 both Gabriel and his father - the former as Swinehard, the latter as Schweinhardt - signed the Lutheran Church articles prepared by Pastor Henry Melchior Muhlenberg on his visit to Frederick. Together with his sons-in-law George Hutzel, George Clem and Joseph Mayhew, and also with Peter Shaver, Michael Reisner and Jacob Staley, George Swinehart stood as bondsman advancing payment for Nichols Bundrick, merchant, who owed Semple Chevalier £129/4 sh. On February 13, 1749, to guarantee payment of his debt, Bundrick mortgaged his lot and building in Fredericktown to these men.

George Swinehart petitioned the November 1747 Court of Prince George's County to be made "levy-free" because of his age. To support his claim for such tax exemption, he testified that "it is set down in his Bible that he was born the fourth day of March in the year 1681." His wife, Anna Margreth, was born in July 1691 and died on May 19, 1776, twenty years after his death in 1756. They were married in 1718 and had nine children, of whom five daughters but only the one son Gabriel survived their mother. In addition to Margaretha Klemm [Clem] above, the daughters included Elisabetha who married Joseph Mayhew in Lancaster, Pennsylvania February 1, 1737, Magdalena who married Johann Georg Hutzel on June 14, 1739 at "Manakesen," Susanna and Anna Maria, baptized by Stöver on April 28, 1736 during his first visit to Monocacy. On November 19, 1745 Gabriel Swinehard married Esther Neff, daughter of Jacob Neff. After George Swinehart's death his widow Anna Margreth Swinehart married Adam Miller in 1759. Miller died in 1767 and she married again in 1771, this time to Philip Grindler.
 
SCHWEINHARDT, Johann Georg (I44242)
 
25250 (1) Trinity Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials; Also Confirmations & Communicants (1858-1874):

John MARCHANT was "b" [baptized].

(2) Trinity Episcopal Church, Toledo, OH, Baptisms, Marriages & Burials; Also Confirmations & Communicants (1874-1891):

John William MARCHANT was confirmed on 05/14/1876 at age 15; his confirmation was no. 275 in this church.

(3) The compiler has not found John W. MARCHANT in the 1870 census.

(4) John W. MARCHANT is listed in a household headed by his father, William MARCHANT, in the 1880 census of Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, IA.

According to the 1880 census, John W. was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1862. According to the 1880 census, he was born in OH.

(5) Graden, Debra, ed., Hoye's City Directory of St. Joseph, Missouri, for 1890 [database online], Orem, UT: Ancestry, Inc., 1999:

Surname: Marchant
Given Name: John
Occupation: Helper K. C. St. J. & C. B. R. R. [Kansas City, St. Joseph and Council Bluffs Railroad] shops
Business Address:
Residence:
Remarks:
Page: 334

(6) Letter dated October 2, 1979 from Marcia Lange, R.R.A., Medical Records Administrator of St. Joseph State Hospital, 3400 Frederick Avenue, St. Joseph, MO 64502, to Mr. and Mrs. Larry L. Porter, regarding John MARCHANT:

We have received your request for information on your great uncle, named above. Our records show that a John Marchant was admitted on May 25, 1891. He was 31 years old at the time of admission and was a resident of Buchanan County, Missouri. No date of birth, place of birth, or relatives names were given. The record states that he was single. I'm sorry I don't have any more information to give you, but I hope this will be of some benefit to you in tracing your family tree.

(7) Record of St. Joseph State Hospital, St. Joseph, MO:

Name, John Marchant.
Admission No., 41
Private or County, Buchanan
County, Buchanan
Date of Admission, May 25, 1891.
Date of 1st Discharge, August 31, 1892.
Sex, Male.; Age, 31.; Civil Condition, Single.;
Occupation, Laborer.; Religion, Protestant.
Education, Common school.; Duration of Insanity, One year.
No. of Attack on First Admission, 1st;
Age at First Attack, 30.
Date of First Attack, May 90.;
Heredity, Negative.
Previous Asylum Treatment, None.
Causation, Sun-stroke.
History Previous to Admission, Patient says he had a sun-stroke some four years ago & has never been well since. Has done nothing for the past year. His insanity has shown itself in depression, fear of personal injury, inability to apply himself to business & a general lack of interest in life.
Form of insanity, Simple melancholia.
Physical Examination and Clinical History,
June 1st. In good general health - eats well, sleeps fairly well.
June 17. Has been no particular change since admission. He is taciturn & moody, imagining he ought to take medication. Says he has been a masturbator & it has ruined his mind. He is lazy and takes no interest in anything.
June 27. No improvement; he is listless, mildly depressed & apparently perfectly satisfied with asylum life.
Aug. 21. No change.
Sept. 25. No change.
Oct. 26. He is a taciturn, good natured fellow, who never talks unless interrogated, obedient & industrious, works in the Laundry.
Nov. 25. No change.
Dec. 30. No change.
Jan. 23, 1892. Has suffered from a prolonged & severe attack of influenza. Been in bed for past 3 weeks. Gave him [illegible], [illegible] & [illegible] as indicated, broken doses of [illegible], followed by saline, whiskey [illegible] & [illegible] for cough. He is still in bed on account of weakness.
Feb. 22. La Grippe left him in a state of great nervous & physical prostration. Is just begin [sic] to be himself again. Has taken acid sal [illegible] for past 3 weeks.
March 28. In usual condition working in the Laundry again.
April 26. The same.
May 30. No change.
June 28. No change.
July 30. Seems to be in as good mental condition as he is capable of getting.
Aug. 30. No change.
Aug. 31, 1892. Discharged. Imp.
Condition at 1st Discharge, Imp.

(8) In the 1900 census of the Iowa State Hospital for the Insane, Mt. Pleasant, Center Township, Henry County, IA, John MARCHANT is listed as a patient who was born in December 1861, and who was then 38 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in MN, and both of his parents were born in Germany. [The compiler believes that the information about the place of his birth and the place of his parents' birth is incorrect.]

(9) In the 1910 census of Mt. Pleasant State Hospital, Mt. Pleasant, Center Township, Henry County, IA, John MARCHANT is listed as an inmate who was then 41 years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1869. According to the 1910 census, he was born in OH. The spaces on the census form for the places of birth of his father and mother were left blank. According to the 1910 census, his occupation was "scrubbing." [The compiler believes that the information about his age was incorrect.]

(10) In the 1920 census of Mt. Pleasant State Hospital, Mt. Pleasant, Center Township, Henry County, IA, John MARCHANT is listed as a patient who was then 59 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1861. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OH. The places of birth of his father and mother were originally shown on the census form to have been unknown, but someone crossed out the word "unknown" on the form, and inserted the initials "U.S." in lieu thereof. According to the 1920 census, his occupation was a "scrub man." [The compiler believes that the information about the place of his parents' birth is incorrect.]

(11) In the 1930 census of Iowa State Hospital for the Insane, Center Township, Henry County, IA, John MARCHANT is listed as a patient who was then 69 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1861. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in England. According to the 1930 census, his occupation was farm worker.

(12) Letter dated April 18, 1979 from Jacque Riehm, A.R.T., Medical Records Services of Mental Health Institute, Mt. Pleasant, IA 52641, to Larry L. Porter regarding John MARCHANT:

This letter is in reply to your recent inquiry about JOHN MARCHANT. Mr. Marchant was indeed here at the Mental Health Institute. He was admitted on February 15, 1896 from Henry County. His correspondent was listed as Mrs. Frank D. Fall. Her address was listed as Gorin - Scotland, MO.

Mr. Marchant was a white, male and was 35 years of age at the time of admission. His birthplace was in Ohio. He was single and a laborer.

At some time prior to his hospitalization here, he may have been in a hospital in St. Joseph, Missouri. No specific institution was listed, so we are unable to give you an address or any further data on the exact location of the hospital.

In case of illness or death, Mrs. Mattie Hawk was to be notified. Her address was Keokuk County, Martinsburg, IA.

Mr. Marchant did die on September 27, 1934. His body was taken to D. L. Cookes funeral home in Mt. Pleasant.

We hope this will be of some help to you. And we do apologize for the lack of concrete information we can give you. As you probably know the charts kept in those days were not very informative. Please feel free to contact us at any time if we can be of further help.

(13) Record of Mental Health Institute, Mt. Pleasant, IA 52641 [formerly Iowa State Hospital for the Insane]:

9674
John Marchant
Henry Co.
Admitted Feby 15th 1896.
Age 35: Single: Laborer: Native of Ohio:
Probably has had other attacks and has been in hospital at St. Joseph, Mo.
Last Wednesday he became depressed and would not talk or do anything. Disease is increasing and variable. He was always peculiar as far as can be learned.
Mch 10/96. This patient was admitted in a state of active maniacal excitement and disturbance. He was brought under restraint and it was reported that he had made desperate resistance to being arrested and had made several vicious attacks on his conductors. He was taken to No. 15, where he has since remained. He has been intensely restless, disturbed and disorderly, showing a strong disposition to attack and injure others without cause or provocation. He talked a good deal in a rambling and incoherent manner, most of his talk being senseless chatter. After a day or two it became evident that his strength was failing and exhaustion was impending. He was confined to bed and place on supportive treatment. He gradually grew quieter and at present is more orderly and not so delirious and disturbed as he has been, but much mental confusion and disorder remains. He is more or less under the influence of ill-defined delusions as well as hallucinations of hearing.
Apr 30/96. Patient continued to grow quieter and now is in an opposite condition of depression. He is dull, sluggish and inactive and has little to say to anyone. He can occasionally be induced to answer simple questions addressed to him fairly well, but efforts at more extensive conversation show considerable mental confusion remaining. He has been sleeping better than he did; has gained in flesh and strength and is up and about without discomfort.
June 10/96. Patient has slowly improved; has gained in mental order and clearness; has become careful and tidy in his personal habits and for some time past has been quite clear and coherent in thought, but it is evident even at best that he is of defective mental organization and it appears that he is subject to recurrant [sic] mania. He says he has been a patient on former occasions in a hospital in Missouri. Bodily health is excellent.
Aug 6/96. Patient continues to get along nicely and he seemed so much better that he was removed from No. 7 to No. 4. He did very well here for a time but this morning he was so meddlesome and annoying to other patients that his return to No. 7 became necessary. A moderate degree of excitement is noticed in his manner and language.
Jany 8/97. There has been no important change in this patient's condition since last date and he remains much the same as described in previous notes.
Sept 15/97. Patient has not changed much on the whole. He is rather variable: has periods when he is quite elated and is restless and uneasy to be followed by one of depression and despondency where he sits about with little to say and taking no interest in matters of ordinary concern. He eats and sleeps well as a rule and is in comfortable bodily health.

(14) http://www.rootsweb.com/~iadesmoi/Toomstone/PleasantGrove/millersburg. htm:

Millersburg Cemetery, Pleasant Grove Township

[Note by Compiler: According to the Geographic Names Information System of the U.S. Geological Survey, the name of the cemetery is Millerburg, not Millersburg.]

MARCHANT, JOHN 1860-1934

(15) The following article about the Iowa State Hospital for the Insane appears in Portrait and Biographical Album of Henry County, Iowa, Chicago, IL: Acme Publishing Co., 1888, pp. 658-664:

FEW persons visit Mt. Pleasant without taking a look through the magnificent buildings for the insane of the State. Gov. Grimes, in his message to the Fifth General Assembly called attention to the necessity of the State providing some place for the care of its insane. Agreeable to his suggestion, the Legislature appointed a commissioner and appropriated $50,000 for the erection of a suitable building. On the 17th of March, 1855, the valuable tract of land now occupied by the asylum, containing 123 acres, was purchased for $25 per acre. The Commissioners, Edward Johnson of Lee County, and Dr. Charles S. Clark of Henry County, authorized by the act, proceeded to visit the best hospitals and asylums in other States, and also procured a plan from Dr. Bell, of the McLean Asylum at Somerville, Mass., which was afterward substantially followed in the erection of the hospital. The act establishing the asylum and appropriating $50,00 0 for the erection of the building, advised that the plan determined on by the board should be one that would admit of future enlargement. From the information obtained, it was readily seen that the $50,000 appropriated would be insufficient, and the Commissioners determined to erect such a building as the experience of others had proved best, trusting to the good sense and liberality of the Legislature to sustain them in their course.

Henry Winslow, who had been connected with the Insane Hospital of Maine, was appointed to superintend the erection of the building, and entered upon the discharge of his duties Oct. 22, 1855. The building was completed and formally opened on the 6th of March, 1861, though one patient had been admitted one week earlier. While the cost of the hospital was much more than the original appropriation, there being $400,000 expended in its erection, it was so constructed that additions have since been made that have not detracted from the orginal beauty of design, but rather added to it, and to-day the building presents a most magnificent appearance, while the grounds are handsomely kept.

The first officers of the hospital were as follows: Commissioners, Hon. James W. Grimes, Hon. Edward Johnstone, Hon. Ralph P. Lowe, Dr. Charles S. Clark, Hon. Samuel J. Kirkwood, W. H. Postlewaite; Treasurer, Presley Saunders; Clerk, M. L. Edwards; Trustees, Harpin Riggs, Samuel McFarland, D. L. McG1 ugin, J. D. Elbert, Joseph M. Merrill, John B. Lash, Lincoln Clark, Timothy Stearns, G. W. Kincaid, Thomas Hedge; Superintendent, R. J. Patterson, M. D.; Assistant Physician, D. C. Dewey, M. D.; Stewards, Henry Winslow, George Josselyn; Matrons, Mrs. Catherine Winslow, Mrs. Anna B. Josselyn.

From the third biennial report of the Trustees the following extract is taken:

"The act for the incorporation and government of the Hospital for the Insane, appointed seven Trustees, two for two years, two for four years and three for six years. The longest term, six years, has not elapsed, yet in this brief space four of the seven have died?CoL Samuel McFarland, Dr. John D. Elbert, Dr. D. L. McGugin and Mr. Harpin Riggs. The survivors feel with deep sensibility this fatal and admonitory incursion of death into their narrow circle; they participate in the grief of the bereaved families of their late associates, and they lament the loss sustained by Iowa of so many citizens whose virtues pointed them out for the work of putting in operation this greatest of the charitable institutions of the State. They cannot refrain from paying some tribute, slight indeed, to the memory and worth of their departed colleagues. Col. McFarland was the youngest member of the board, yet he had attained the foremost rank among the legislators and politicians of the State. He was the author of the law under which we are now acting, and prepared the code of by-laws by which the institution is now governed. No member of the board had more weight or influence than he. When his country summoned him to arms, he obeyed her voice with alacrity, and led his regiment to the field of battle, where he fell, gallantly fighting at its head.

"Dr. Elbert was a pioneer in the settlement of the State; he had been a member of the Territorial Legislature, and President of the Council.. His generosity, kindness of disposition, and his public spirit, made him a suitable guardian of an institution of charity, and .his cordial good humor made him an agreeable companion in every circle.

"Dr. McGugin occupied the highest rank as a physician, and he devoted his fine talents with zeal to the advancement of medical science and to the improvement of medical education. He gave the first impulse to the movement which resulted in the establishment of this magnificent institution. He made a journey in the winter to the capital of the State, to deliver an address before the Legislature, on the necessity of erecting a hospital for the insane.

"Mr. Riggs was a man of practical and solid sense, and remarkable capacity for the transaction of business. The city of Mt. Pleasant and the county of Henry had employed him in various responsible offices, the duties of which he discharged with exemplary fidelity. It was fortunate for the county to have a citizen so upright and so gifted, and it was creditable to the people to employ him in their service."

On the 18th day of April, 1876, the rear building of the hospital was burned. From a report made by the Trustees, on Oct. 18, 1877, which report was addressed to His Excellency, Joshua G. Newbold, Governor of Iowa, the following is an extract:

"The burning of the engine-house of the hospital was a calamity unforeseen and of course unprovided for. It placed upon the Board of Trustees what they felt to be a grave responsibility, and which would admit of no evasion, but must be met. The boilers, engines and machinery, were either destroyed or left without an inclosure or covering. They felt that there was but one course to pursue, and that was to rebuild. It was not a matter of convenience, but of absolute necessity. The erection of a temporary structure was canvassed and rejected, as being impossible to meet the indispensable wants of the hospital during the winter season, as well as being a useless expenditure of money, and as endangering the entire institution. After mature consideration, and advising with Gov. Kirkwood and other State officers, it was determined to proceed at once to rebuild in a substantial manner, leaving the building unfinished, except so far as necessary to finish, to meet the immediate pressing needs of the hospital. The Superintendent, assisted by Mr. George Josselyn, who had superintended the building of the hospital at Independence, prepared plans which were approved by the board, and the work proceeded under the personal supervision of the Superintendent, who consented to assume that great addition to his duties and responsibities, and there has been expended the sum of $32,046.43, the details of which are appended to this report. A considerable amount of the sum was not expended upon the building, but was for repairing and replacing machinery destroyed and damaged, and other items. It is believed that for economy in building, strength and durability, as well as for convenience and safety, this structure will compare favorably with any public work in the State. To complete, it will require an expenditure of $5,500. The estimates for proper hospital accommodations were over $39,000.

In January, 1882, Dr. Ranney, who for so many years had served as Superintendent of the asylum, died, his death being greatly lamented by every friend of the institution. Dr. H. M. Bassett kindly assumed the duties of Superintendent until the Trustees could secure a successor. This was done in July, and on the 16th day of October following, Dr. H. A. Gilman, long and favorably known as the First Assistant Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane, at Jacksonville, Ill., commenced his services as Superintendent.

In his first biennial report, Dr. Gilman urged the erection of additional wings to the building for the accommodation of the increased number of patients for whom admission was sought in the institution. The Legislature wisely heeded the request of the Doctor, made the appropriations and gave him charge of their erection. This additional labor he cheerfully assumed, and in connection with this brief sketch a fine lithographic view of the building and grounds is given.

In addition to the erection of the wings, erected at a cost of $200,000, the rooms in the old building have been renovated throughout, repainted and redecorated. Elegant pictures are hung upon the walls of each public room, and everything done to make the surroundings pleasant to the patients.

The following named comprise the officers of the hospital at this writing:

Board of Trustees - D. A. Hurst, M. D., President, Oskaloosa; J. H. Kulp, M. D., Secretary, Davenport; P. W. Lewellen, M. D., Clarinda; G. W. Cullison, Harlan; G. H. Sharp, Mt. Pleasant.

Treasurer - C. V. Arnold, Mt. Pleasant.

Resident officers - H. A. Gilman, M. D., Superintendent and Physician; M. E. Witte, M. D., First Assistant Physician; F. P. Peck, M. D., Second Assistant Physician; P. F. Straub, M. D., Third Assistant Physician; J. M. Aitken, M. D., Fourth Assistant Physician; E. N. Nelson, Steward; Mrs. F. V. Cole, Matron.

The attention of the reader is called to the biography of Dr. Gilman for an account of his special work for the hospital. 
MARCHANT, John William (I794)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 ... 525» Next»