First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Notes


Matches 25,151 to 25,200 of 26,342

      «Prev «1 ... 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 ... 527» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
25151 (1) The following three different William LINDSEYs lived in Brunswick County, VA in the 1840s:

• A William who was married to a Jane.

• A William who was married to a Mary.

• A William who was a schoolmaster in Meherrin Parish and apparently died unmarried with no children.

One of the first two William LINDSEYs remained in Brunswick County, VA, dying testate there before 26 September 1768 without mentioning his wife in his will dated 11 May 1766. The compiler believes that this William LINDSEY was the husband of Jane.

The other one of the first two William LINDSEYs sold his land in Brunswick County, VA in 1754 and moved to Halifax County, NC, dying intestate there before 28 July 1772, leaving sons William, Joseph and John surviving him. The compiler believes that this William LINDSEY (the father of William, Joseph and John) was the husband of Mary.

(2) The following Notes refer to the William LINDSEY who was married to Mary.

(3) Message from William Lindsey to the LINDSAY-L Mailing List dated December 29, 2009:

A William Lindsey was in Spotsylvania by 5-6 Nov. 1722, when Larkin Chew sold to William Lindsey 200 acres in St. George Psh., the deed stating that both lived in Spotsylvania Co., St. George Psh., north of the River Po out of a grant to Chew (Spotsylvania DB A, pp. 43-4). Christopher (X) Bell, John Chew, and James Newton wit., with Larkin Chew signing. Larkin Chew acknowledged the deed 2 April 1723 and it was recorded.

The same day, William Lindsey wit. a deed of Larkin Chew of St. George Psh. to Samuel Moore of same for land adj. Lawrence Franklin and Harry Beverley. Other wit. were Wm. Warren and George Trible (DB A). In my view, this is the William Lindsey who was a processioner of land between the Po and Ta in Spotsylvania Co. in 1731. Felder shows this William living beside Harry Beverly in St. George's Parish in 1731. In addition, also living in this vicinity was Edward Pigg.

In my view, the William Lindsey who appears in the Spotsylvania records at this time is William Lindsey with wife Mary who can be shown to appear in Brunswick Co., VA, records in 1743 shortly after the William of Spotsylvania sold his land there. Because a William Lindsey of New Kent Co., VA (with wife Jane) came to Brunswick Co. shortly after, these two Williams have been confused in various accounts of the Lindsey lines in southern VA and northern NC. A careful study of deed, court, and tax
records, along with the locations of both men's land in Brunswick Co., shows that they are two different persons.

I am concluding that the William with wife Mary is the Spotsylvania William, because he shows up in Brunswick Co. precisely when the William in Spotsylvania leaves this county. No records I have found in Spotsylvania name the wife of the William who lived there, but her name appears in records in Brunswick Co., VA, and Edgecombe and Halifax Co., NC.

Note that if William Lindsey was of age in 1722, his date of birth would be by about 1700, or possibly prior to this. The sale of William Lindsey's land in Halifax Co., NC, in 1772 indicates he had died in Halifax Co., NC, by that year. William had a son Joseph who was of age by 1749.

Note that Chew had acquired tracts of land between the Po and Ta by this point and was selling them to smaller landholders. . . .

Note that the 7 May 1745 Nicholas Hawkins deed cited below indicates that William Lindsey's land in Spotsylvania Co. (which he sold to Nicholas Hawkins) was sold by Larkin Chew to William Lindsey on 5 Nov. 1722, and the 5 May 1724 deed of Chew to Henry Martin indicates that William Lindsey's land joined that of Chew. According to Mansfield (cited below), in 1722, Chew, one of the county's largest landlords, sold 200 aces to William Lindsey and 300 to Henry Martin.

According to Paula S. Felder, Forgotten Companions: The First Settlers of Spotsylvania County and Fredericksburgh Town (Fredericksburgh: Historic Publications, 1982), Wm. Bartlett, Richard Blanton, and Larkin Chew were processioners in 1731 of the land in Spotsylvania that was formerly King and Queen - i.e., from midway between the Massaponax and the Ni down to the Po and acress the St. George Psh. line (p. 52). This information is from a processioners' report, April 1732, and patent and deed records. Felder says that names in this precinct in early records include Larkin Chew, Lawrence Battaile, Nicholas Hawkins, Richard Blanton, Henry Martin, John Chew, Harry Beverley, Francis and Anthony Thornton, and others.

In a query posted 28 March 2004 to the Lindsey discussion group at Genforum, a Beverly (?) notes that Richard Blanton was s/o Thomas and Jane McGuffey Blanton of Old Rappahannock Co., VA, and was b. abt. 1675. Richard Blanton is said to have married Elizabeth Lindsey abt. 1720 in Spotsylvania Co., and this couple had a dau. Mary, b. 1728, who m. Alexander Hawkins.

James Roger Mansfield, A History of Early Spotsylvania (Orange, VA: Green, 1977), notes that in the testimony of 1733-4 to settle the disputed Fairfax grant between the Potomac and Rappahannock, Francis Thornton of Caroline (the Snow Creek Francis - said he settled on Snow Creek in 1703 when there were only two other houses nearby; John Taliaferro gave similar testimony. Mansfield notes that this indicates Spotsylvania was practically empty by abt. 1700, but by 1720, as the area opened, a rush to settle it occurred (p. 12). The county was formed in 1721.

On 7 Apr. 1724, William Lindsey was among those appointed to oversee a road from the east northeast to the head of the Mattapony River towards Germana (Road Orders, 7 Apr. 1724, p. 66 - see ibid., p. 8).

On 4 May 1724, Larkin Chew sold Henry Martin 300 acres in St. George Psh., Spotsylvania Co., the deed noting that both lived in this parish and county. The land adj. William Lindsey and Harry Beverley (down a branch at Punch Point on the Po (Spotsylvania DB A, 87-9). In a 13 Jan. 1998 email message to me, Jeffrey Martin (martin@fairind.com) tells me that Henry Martin was b. 1685 in New Kent Co., VA, and it is believed that his son William, with wife Rose, went to Brunswick Co., VA, where their daughter Rose m. Caleb, son of William Lindsey.

On 2 Oct. 1725, Larkin Chew sold to Nicholas Copland of Essex Co. 280 acres in Spotsylvania bordering William Lindsey, Henry Martin, and Nicholas Hawkins (Spotsylvania DB A, pp. 162-3).

On 1 Nov. 1726, William Lindsey was sworn to the grand jury (Spotsylvania Order Bk. 1724-30, p. 113; see Ruth and Sam Sparacio, Order Book Abstracts of Spotsylvania Co., VA 1724-1730, Part II [1320 Mayflower Dr., McLean, VA 22101: Antient Press, 1990], p. 1).

Spotsylvania Order Bk. 1724-30 also shows that a case of William Lindsey vs. John Campbell was dismissed on 3 May 1727, since no declaration had been made.

According to Felder, cited above, William Lindsey was processioner in 1731 of the land between the Po and Ta and across St. George's Psh. Living in this section of the county were William Lindsey himself and Robert Beverley. A 1731 land patent of Robert Brooke shows that his land adj. Beverley's in Spotsyvlania (VA Mag. Hist. Biog. 15 [1907-8], p. 104). Felder appears to be citing the Vestry Minutes of St. George's Psh. for 30 Aug. 1731, which say that the processioning was to be done between the first Sunday of Oct. and the last day of March 1732.

The processioning report, signed by Robert King, William Lindsey, and John Durrat, is given in the minutes for 19 Apr. 1732, and is dated 30 March 1732; I have a copy.

William Lindsey wit. the will of Richard Blanton in Spotsylvania on 3 Sept. 1734 (WB A, p.?; see Wm. Armstrong Crozier, Virginia County Records, vol. 1: Spotsylvania County, p. 5).

On 7 Feb. 1738, the Spotsylvania Order Book notes that William Lindsey had petitioned to clear a road from his plantation to the main road through Nicholas Hawkins' land, and that a Caleb Lindsey was among those ordered to assist (OB 1738, p. 33). Since William Lindsey with wife Jane, who was in Brunswick Co., VA, by 1745, had a son Caleb, this reference has led some researchers to think that the William who is in Spotsylvania Co. records up to 1743 is William with wife Jane.

Which suggests that the Caleb Lindsey in this record is a different Caleb than the son of William and Jane of that name. . . .

But after a careful study of the Brunswick records (along with those in Edgecombe and Halifax Co., NC), I have come to the conclusion that the William Lindsey who is in Brunswick Co. by 1743 is William with wife Mary.

On 6 Apr. 1742, William Lindsey of Spotsylvania wit. the deed of Nicholas Copeland of Orange to John Sutton of land in St. George Psh.; other witnesses were John Chew and Benjamin Martin (Spotsylvania DB C).

On 26 Apr. 1743, William Lindsey of St. George Psh., Spotsylvania, sold to Nicholas Hawkins of same 200 acres, with wit. Wm. (X) Martin, Parmenas Bowker, John (X) Hutcherson, John (X) Sutton, James Hawkins, Nathan Hawkins, and Alexander Hawkins (Spotsylv. DB D, 46-50). The deed specifies that the land was out of a tract of 3800 acres of Larkin Chew, part of which Chew sold to Lindsey on 5 Nov. 1722. William Lindsey signed and sealed. The deed was pr. by Sutton, Martin, Hawkins, and Hutcheson on 7 June 1743 and recorded.

It appears that William Lindsey was selling out to move south to Brunswick Co., VA. An indicator of the migration from northern VA to the southside, and Lunenburg Co., in particular, during this time frame is the fact that on 5 June 1747 the Lunenburg County court ordered that a road be laid off and cleared from Stanton River to the Mayo Settlement at the Wart Mountains in what was then Lunenburg (Carol Baker Wahl, "Hickey's Road," The Pittsylvania Packet 25 [Summer 1997], p. 6). This road came to be known as Hickey's Road, and it played a major part in the settlement of the frontier of Southside VA.

On 3 May 1743, the court ordered William Martin to serve in room of William Lindsey as overseer of the road from John Chew's plantation Cowland, and on 3 May 1743, a deed of William Lindsey to Nicholas Hawkins was pr. by John Sutton, James Hawkins, and John Hutcherson (pp. 218-9). Thereafter I don't find William Lindsey in the order books. This suggests that he moved south in or around 1743, precisely the period in which a William Lindsey shows up in Brunswick Co., VA, records, and briefly in Edgecombe Co., NC, records. By the same month, a William Lindsey begins to appear in Brunswick Co., VA, records. On 5 May 1743, he wit. the deed of Jehu Peoples to Saml Huckaby, both of Brunswick Co. Other witnesses were Thomas Lanier and Wm. Denton. The deed was proven 5 May 1743 (Brunswick DB 2, 274, p. 579). This William may later have ties to Halifax Co., VA, where John Lindsey, a son of James Lindsey and Sarah Daniel, went. On 4 May 1759, William Lindsey and wife Mary sold to Elijah Humphries 170 acres in Halifax Co. that William Lindsey had purchased from Francis Jones on 21 Nov. 1749 on the east side of Rocky Swamp adj. James Salmon. The deed was signed by both Wm. and Mary by mark, and wit. by Samuel Huckaby and Peter Denton (Halifax DB 7, 67).

On 19 Nov. 1744, Moses Swinney of Edgecombe sold to William Lindsey of Brunswick 400 acres adj. Briedeley, with Wm. Person and John Egerton wit. (Edgecombe DB 5, p. 303). On 10 Nov. 1744, William Lindsey of Brunswick sold to Samuel Huckaby 200 acres at the mouth of spring branch, out of the 400-acre tract, with Person and Egerton wit. (ibid., p. 304). Note that this appears to be the William Lindsey with land in Halifax Co. by 1741 - see above.

In Nov. 1744, Edgecombe court minutes show William Lindsey acknowledging the deeds from Moses Swinney and to Samuel Hucke(by?; original torn) (p. 20).

Edgecombe deed books show that the man selling this land was of Brunswick Co., VA. On 16 Nov. 1747, William Lindsey of Brunswick Co., VA, with wife Mary, sold to George Mabry of Brunswick 200 acres out of 400 acres William Lindsey had purchased from Moses Swinney in Edgecombe Co., NC (Edgecombe DB 3, 204). The deed from Swinney to William Lindsey is in Edgecombe DB 5, p. 303. Immediately following this deed is one in which William Lindsey sells to Samuel Huckebee of Brunswick Co., VA, 200 acres out of the tract he bought from Swinney (ibid., 304). Both deeds place William Lindsey in Brunswick Co., VA.

I suspect the Mary Lindsey above is the Mary Lindsey summoned with Wm. Cornish to give evidence in Spotsylvania Co. on 4 Sept. 1728, re: a bastard child said to have been born to Elizabeth Head of John Blanton, who had been buried (OB 1724-30, p. 260).

On 6 Feb. 1745, William Lindsey sold to Lemuell Cocke of Southwark Psh. in Surry Co. 174 acres sold by patent to William Lindsey on 20 Aug. 1745 [sic]. The deed was wit. by Nicholas Edmunds and Thos. Cocke and pr. 6 Feb. 1745. The deed notes that William Lindsey resided in Brunswick Co. (Brunswick DB 3, 58).

On 7 May 1745, a deed of Nicholas Hawkins to Nathan Hawkins, both of Spotsylv., St. Geo., notes that the land was out of a grant to Larkin Chew, sold by a deed 5 Nov. 1722 by Chew to William Lindsey (DB D). Note that this deed corroborates that William Lindsey had sold his Spotsylvania Co. land and moved away.

25 March 1749, Joseph Lindsey patents 350 acres in Granville Co. north side of Anderson's swamp, joining a branch and the said swamp. Wits. were Dan Weldon and Gideon Macon. Chain carriers were Edward Moore and Leonard Lindsey (Granv. Pat. Bk. 11, 1914, p. 439). The survey was done on 14 March 1748. This appears to be Joseph Lindsey son of William and Mary Lindsey. It also seems reasonable to suppose that Leonard Lindsey is closely related to William Lindsey with wife Mary - but how?

On the very same day in Granville, Dennis Lindsey was chain carrier for three surveys, including one for his son-in-law Roger Thornton. Gideon Macon wit. this survey. His appearance in the survey for Joseph Lindsey seems to link these two men.

If the preceding Joseph Lindsey is son of William Lindsey with wife Mary, then the fact that Joseph is of age by 1749 (with a birth date by about 1729) seems to confirm a birth date of 1700 or earlier for this William Lindsey.

Sometime in the period from 1748-1758, William Lindsey with wife Mary moved to Edgecombe/Halifax Co., NC. He is definitely there by 1758 (see Blackwell deed below), and is probably there as early as 1754 when he buys land in Edgecombe from Francis Jones after selling land in Brunswick Co. to John Brown. A number of deeds from 1750-1754 show a William Lindsey in Brunswick who could be either William with wife Mary or William with wife Jane. These are as follows:

On 4 March 1750, William Lindsey wit. the deed of John Parker of Lunenburg to Daniel Sears of Brunswick of land in Brunswick. Other wit. were John Clack and Wm. Murphy (DB 5, p. 59).

An 8 Jan. 1752 affidavit of John Wall, Jr., says that he falsely accused Henry Jackson of taking his
watch while the two were at the ordinary near Brunswick courthouse. Others present were John Clack, Laurence Smith, and William Lindsey. The watch had been laid on the billiard table and thought lost, but was then found. So many were intoxicated at the time that it was difficult to know what had taken
place (DB 5, p. 514).

On 8 Feb. 1752, William Lindsey wit. two deeds of Henry Bailey of Lunenburg Co. to Wm. Merritt of Elizabeth City Co. for land in Brunswick. Henry Embry, John Merritt, and Jeremiah Wize were other wit. (DB 5, 507-8).

William Lindsey wit. an 18 Feb. deed of Peter Simmons Sr. to Peter Jr., Brunswick (DB 5, 525).

On 11 May 1754, William Lindsey wit. the deed of Wm. McKnight of Brunswick to Thomas Meriot of same (DB 5, 709).

On 24 June 1754, William Lindsey wit. the deed of gift of land by John Ingram Sr. to John Ingram Jr., both of Brunswick (DB 5, 688).

In my view, the preceding 1750 and 1752 Brunswick deeds involving members of the Clack family are for William Lindsey with wife Jane, who witnessed Mary Clack's will in 1763.

30 Jan. 1754, Leonard Lindsey had a warrant for 640 acres in Granville north side of Great Island
Creek adj. Haywood's line and both sides of Crooked Creek; the warrant was originally issued to Sherwood Haywood when the land was surveyed 31 Aug. 1753 (Granville Dist. Miscellaneous Land Office Papers, 3155).

26 Feb. 1754: William and Mary Lindsey in Brunswick Co. sell their land there to John Brown - see 1760 deed below. They are evidently moving to Halifax Co., NC, at this time.

1 March 1754, John Bird had a plat for 640 acres in Granville both sides of Little Island Creek with Lanard Lindsey the chain carrier; the entry was 20 May 1753 (Granville Dist. Miscellaneous Land Office
Papers, 2385).

A 28 Nov. 1754 Granville patent to William Searcy for land on Great Island Creek adj. William Haywood and Moore shows Lanard Lindsay as a chain carrier for the survey on 23 Sept. 1754 (Granv. Pat. Bk. 14, 2828, p. 74).

2 Jan. 1756: Leonard Lindsey received a patent for 325 acres in Granville Co., Psh. of St. John, joining William Haywood and Crooked Branch. The survey was 1 March 1754, with Reuben Searcy and John Bird as chain carriers (Granv. Pat. Bk. 11, 438). The land patent has a note that it was returned with refusal to pay.

4 Jan. 1757, Leonard Lindsey had a warrant for 640 acres in Granville adj. Joseph Kimball, Jr. and Jorden's and Eaton's line on the lower side of the upper fork of Anderson swamp. The entry was on 2 Dec. 1756 and the grant itself on 27 Nov. 1760 (Granville Dist. Miscellaneous Land Office Papers,
3156).

1 March 1757, William Lindsey's son Joseph Lindsey is chain carrier for a survey in Granville Co. for Leonard Lindsey - see below. See also Granville Dist. Miscellaneous Land Office Papers, 3157, noting that the land is east of Anderson Swamp adj. Joseph Kimball, Jr. and Col. Eaton. The entry was 2 Dec. 1756.

The 24 Nov. 1760 deed of John Brown and wife Olive indicates that on 26 Feb. 1754, William Lindsey and wife Mary of St. Andrew Psh. sold to John Brown of Nottoway Psh. in Southampton Co. 143 acres sold by George Harper to William Lindsey. This land was sold in 1760 to Thomas Harrison: Indenture made the 24th day of November, 1760, between John Brown and Olive, his wife, of Nottoway Parrish, Southampton County, parties of the first part, and Thomas Harrison for 42 pounds 10 shillings, conveying 143 acres of which lower part of land bounded by land of Peter Simmons and upper part of land bounded by lands of John Butts and John Jackson, and being part of a larger tract formerly belonging to John Denton, deceased, and by John Denton devised to Elizabeth Harper, wife of George Harper and by them sold to William Lindsey by Deed recorded in Williamsburgh and by William Lindsey conveyed unto the said John Brown by deed dated February 26, 1754, and recorded in Brunswick County. Signed by John Brown and Olive Brown (her mark). Witnesses were Jas. Stewart, James Harrison, William Knight, Peny. Hurst, and Ingram Blanks. Indenture proved in Court on January 26, 1761, by the oaths of James Stewart, William Knight, and Peny. Hurst, and as to Olive Browne by the oaths of James Stewart and William Knight (Deed Book 6, page 600).

Edgecombe DB 4, 524, records an 8 Jan. 1754 deed of Francis Jones of Bladen Co. to William Lindsey of unidentified for 170 acres on the east side of Rocky Swamp adj. Jones (DB 4, p. 524). Note that the location suggests that this is the William Lindsey who bought land in Edgecombe from Daniel and Sarah Blackwell in 1758. This deed is wit. by Samuel Huckaby, who was of Brunswick Co., VA, and who on 17 May 1748, sold to George Mabry 200 acres out of a trace patented to Moses Swaney/Swinney, in a deed recorded next to the 1747 deed in which William Lindsey bought land from Mabry that had also been patented to Swaney/Swinney (Edgec. DB 3, p. 205).

1 Jan. 1757: John Lindsey buys from John and Elizabeth Good, all of Halifax Co., 150 acres adj. Great Branch, Anthony Winston, George Morris, Joseph John Alston, Robert Green, and John Good (Halifax DB 9, 1216). Son John is of age by this date, and thus born by 1737.

On 6 May 1757, John Bird pat. 680 acres in Granville Co., St. John Psh., adj. Joseph Lindsey, Thomas Ford, and William Searcy. The name William Moore is written below Bird's name (Granville Pat. Bk. 11, 1374, p. 320). It seems reasonable to me to believe this is Joseph Lindsey, son of William and Mary. Granville Dist.

Miscellaneous Land Office Papers, 2386 shows that John Bird also had a warrant for land with a similar description issued on 24 Oct. 1754, and that it was on Anderson's Swamp, with the entry dated 6 July 1754 and the grant on 27 Nov. 1760.

In June 1758, a deed by Daniel Blackwell to Wm. Lindsey, both of Edgecombe Co., NC, was proven by William Roberts (Edgecombe Ct. Minutes 1758, p. 202). In the same month, Wm. Fuqua was appointed overseer of the road in room of William Lindsey (ibid., p. 201).

The deed of Daniel Blackwell cited above is in Edgecombe DB 6, p. 305. It shows that on 6 March 1758, Daniel and Sarah Blackwell sold to William Lindsey, all of Edgecombe, for 8 pounds VA money 100 acres from a tract belonging to John Pasmore decd. on the east side of Rocky Swamp.

29 Aug. 1758, a survey for John Huckaby of 642 acres in Halifax Co. in the parish of Edgecombe on both sides of Burncoat Swamp notes that the land adj. Samuel Huckaby, Brickel's corner, Ealback's line, Colman's line, and Lindsey's line (Granville Pat. Bk. 14, 2944, p. 140).

William Lindsay bought 100 acres from Joseph Passmore on east side of Rocky Swamp in Halifax on 26 March 1759, with Elijah Humphries, Peter Denton, and Daniel Blackwell wit. (Halifax DB 7, 65).

4 May 1759, Wm. Lindsey to Elijah Humphries, £39 VA, 170A which Linsey purchased from Francis Jones 21 Nov 1749 on east sideRocky Swamp adj James Salmon. Signed William (x) Linsey, Mary (x) Linsey. Witnesses Saml. Huckaby, Peter Denton (Halifax DB 7: 68).

On 10 Jan. 1760,George Mabry of Halifax sold to John Ellis of same 400 acres that had been patented on 15 March 1742 and conveyed by Swinney to William Lindsey and then back to Swinney by Wm. Lindsey (Halifax DB , p. 413).

3 May 1760: George Goodwin of Halifax Co. sells to John Lindsey, formerly of Virginia but now of Halifax Co., 320 acres on the south side of Conconary Swamp (Halifax DB 7, 213). I believe this is the John Lindsey who is son of James Lindsey and Sarah Daniel first appearing in Halifax Co., and that this is why the deed specifies that he is formerly of VA. From this point, the two John Lindseys in Halifax have to be separated from each other.

27 Nov. 1760, Leonard Lindsey pat. 640 acres in Granville Co., Psh. Of St. John, east side of Anderson's swamp, joining Joseph Kimbal, Jr. and the swamp. Wits. were Will Hurst, Blake Baker. Chain carriers were George Jorden and Joseph Lindsey (Granville Pat. Bk. 11, 1892, p. 434). The survey was 1 March 1757.

29 July 1761, Leonard Lindsey patented 420 acres in Granville Co. both sides of Falling Creek, with Thomas Lowe and Robert Whitaker wit. (Granville Pat Bk. 11, 1899, p. 436). The survey was 24 March the same year.

On 14 Nov. 1761, Wm. Lindsey was a chain carrier for the survey of 216 acres in Halifax Co., NC, for Thomas Bull, tract adjoining William Fuquay,John Huccabay, Parram's Corner, Ellbeck's line, and Thomas Wiggins (Granv. Pat. Bk. 14, p. 181, #3063). Henry Bull was the other chain carrier.

2 Sept. 1761, John Huckaby to George Passmore, £10, 100A, part of a 1760 Granville grant to said Huckaby, east side Rocky Swamp adj Samuel Huckaby, Elijah Humphrey. Wits John Sullivent, William Lindsay. Proved Mar Ct 1762. Halifax DB 8: 91.

6 May 1762, Joseph Lindsey was a chain carrier with Thomas Bull for a survey of 360 acres in Halifax Co. for James Hogun adj. Meade's corner, Roberts' line, John Chapman, John Sullivant, and Lockhart's line (Granville Pat. Bk. 14, 2946, p. 140). Note the name John Sullivant, who appears in transactions with William Lindsey.

13 June 1762, Joseph Lindsey wit. will of John Daniel, Granville Co., NC (Granville Co. Rec. 1762-1765, p. 12). The will was prob. Aug. 1762.

3 Aug. 1762, William Daniel had an entry for 700 acres in Edgecombe south of Little Swamp, adj. Joseph Lindsey (spelled Lince), Joseph Daniel, and Jacob Barnes (Granv. Misc. Land Office Papers, 1147).

Aug. 1762, Joseph Lindsey is among petitioners to the court of Granville Co. for the establishment of a Presbyterian Church (Gr. Co. Rec. 1762-1765, p. 4).

A 4 Dec. 1762 deed of James Huckaby to Owen Flukes for land in Halifax Co., NC, notes that the land adj. Wm. Lindsey. Samuel Huckaby was a wit. (Halifax DB 8, p. 643).

17 Jan. 1763, Wm. and Mary Lindsey (the deed names him as Sr., indicating the presence of a younger William who has come of age by this time in Halifax - possibly his son of this name) of Halifax sold to David Flukes 200 acres from Joseph Passmore, both signing by mark (Halifax DB 8, p. 603). The land is on the east side of Rocky Swamp. Witnesses are John Sullivent, Owen Flukes, and James Lamons. Halifax DB 8: 198.

20 Nov. 1763, Wm. Lindsey bought from Robert Chapman of Halifax Co. 125 acres on west side of Rocky Swamp. A Wm. Lindsey was a wit., signing his name (Halifax DB 9, p. 961). Because of the preceding deed in Jan. of the same year, the man signing here may be a younger William, who had come of age
by this year.

11 April 1763: Leonard Lindsey was a chain carrier for the survey by Joseph Kimball of 530 acres in Granville Co., both sides Reedy Fork of Anderson's swamp, adj. Bartholemew Kimball. Wits. were George Martin and Philemon Hawkins (Granville Pat. Bk. 11, 1871, p. 429).

2nd Tuesday in November, Bute Co. court minutes show Joseph Lindsey among those ordered to maintain a road from the Cypress to Ferrill's Bridge.

On 2 Sept. 1769, Wm. Lindsey wit. the deed of John Huckaby to George Passmore in Halifax Co. (DB 8, p. 508). The deed notes that the land adj. Samuel Huckaby.

15 May 1771, Bute Co., NC, court minutes show a deed from Leonard Lindsey to Joseph Rowland proven by West Harris.

The William in Halifax Co. had died by 28 July 1772, when William, Joseph, and John Lindsey of Halifax sold to Jesse Weaver of Halifax 125 acres out of the patent to John Edwards on the west side of Rocky Swamp (Halifax DB 12, 211). The deed notes that the land was 125 acres west side of Rockey Swamp adj. the Spring Branch, Smiths Branch, and David Chapman. Witnesses were Thomas Wiggins, Henry Wiggins, and Edward Jordin. The deed recites that grantors "hath infallible estate of inheritance in fee simple . . . & hath full power and lawful authority to sell and dispose." It is not clear to me any Halifax records that these sons of William Lindsey remain in Halifax Co. from this point on. Tax records show the John Lindsey who married Mary Masterson, but not the sons of William Lindsey.

20 Nov. 1777, John Lindsey and Mary his wife sell 326 acres in Halifax out of a 1720 patent to George Gooding on Connara Swamp. The buyer is Richard Carney of Bertie Co. Both John and Mary sign. Witnesses are Charles Blanton, Giles Long, Reubin Norfleet (Halifax DB 13, 564). Since this John Lindsey has a wife Mary, he is likely the son of James Lindsey and Sarah Daniel, since that John is known to have married Mary Masterson.

24 Jan. 1778, John Lindsey buys from John Somerville, both Halifax, 688 acres on Great Creek adj. John Blanton and others (Halifax DB 13, 568). The Blanton reference makes me think this is John Lindsey with wife Mary Masterson.

3 Jan. 1779, John Lindsey buys from John Joseph Alston, both Halifax, 300 acres (Halifax DB 14, 726). The Alston reference makes me think this is John Lindsey with wife Mary Masterson - see 1782 deed.

In a 5 May 2007 email to me, Ron Lindsay (ronlindsay@comcast.net) tells me that Nash County, NC DB 3-240 has a deed stating that William Linsey received a 300-acre land grant, from the state of NC Gov. Richard Caswell in Nash County, NC on November 10, 1779, apparently for his Revolutionary War services. This tract of land was located on the north side of Little Peachtree Creek, adjoining his own line, et al. Ron Lindsay notes, "Thus we can assume from this deed that William Linsey already owned other property on Little Peachtree Creek in Nash County, NC, prior to Nov. 10, 1779."

7 Oct. 1782: Willis Alston sells to John Lindsey, both Halifax, 23½ acres joining John Lindsey's present land, Charles Blanton and others. Wit. Are Henry Dawson, James Lindsey (Halifax DB 15, 1147). Evidently John Lindsey with wife Mary Masterson and their son James.

Had Joseph Lindsey died by 7 Feb. 1785? A land entry by Ephraim Vaughn on 15 June 1778 date for 300 acres in Bute Co. on Little Peachtree Creek notes that the land had been caveated by Joseph Lindsey on 25 Aug. 1778, but that Lindsey had died when the warrant was issued 7 Feb. 1785 (Bute Co. Land Entries 1778-1779, 223, p. 49).

20 Feb. 1786: John Lindsey buys from Isaac Jackson and William Jackson, all of Halifax, 250 acres adj. Little Creek and Great Creek (Halifax DB 15, 1477).

Halifax Co., NC, ct. order bk. minutes for Nov. 1789 show a John Lindsey appointed with Robert Green, John Green, and Henry Dawson to procession bounds in district 13 of the county (OB 1, p. 115).

Halifax Co. OB minutes for May 1797 show John Lindsey Sr. and Jr. ordered to work on the road where Lewis Willis is overseer (OB 2, p. 112). The younger John was of age by Nov. 1796, when he appears in ct. minutes ordered to divide an estate.

In the 5 May 2007 email to me from Ron Lindsay cited above, Ron Lindsay states that Robin Rankin Willis believes that Joseph Lindsey was married to Elizabeth, and that John Lindsey had wife Dinah.
 
LINDSEY, William (I42719)
 
25152 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Anne Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Botolph

Name: Anne Frost
Father's Name: Richard Frost
Mother's Name: Anne
Date: 2nd November 1690
Parish: Colchester St Botolph
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Anne (I39116)
 
25153 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Eleanor Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Botolph

Name: Eleanor Frost
Father's Name: Thomas Frost
Born Date: 17th March 1704[/5]
Gregorian Born Date: 1705-03-17
Parish: Colchester St Botolph
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Eleanor (I39114)
 
25154 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Francis Frost in the Parish of Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex

Name: Francis Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name: Mary
Date: 9th March 1700
Parish: Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Francis (I38999)
 
25155 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for Jacob Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Peter

Name: Jacob Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Date: 28th March 1703
Parish: Colchester St Peter
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Jacob (I38618)
 
25156 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For James Frost in the Parish of Greenstead St Andrew (Greenstead-Juxta-Colchester)

Name: James Frost
Father's Name: Jacob Frost
Mother's Name: Alice
Date: 1st March 1796
Parish: Greenstead St Andrew (Greenstead-Juxta-Colchester)
County: Essex
Event: Baptism

(2) A household headed by James FROST is listed in the 1841 census of Fobbing, Essex, England.

James is listed in the 1841 census as an agricultural laborer who was then 40 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, he was born in about 1801. However, because of the way ages were rounded in the 1841 census, he could have then been as old as 44 years of age. According to the 1841 census, he was born in Essex, England.

Listed with James is his wife, Mary, who as then 45 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, she was born in about 1796. However, because of the way ages were rounded in the 1841 census, she could have then been as old as 49 years of age. According to the 1841 census, she was born in Essex, England.

Also listed with James is his son, William, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, he was born in about 1828. According to the 1841 census, he was born in Essex, England.

Also listed with James is his son, John, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, he was born in about 1829. According to the 1841 census, he was born in Essex, England.

Also listed with James is his daughter, Mary, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, she was born in about 1831. According to the 1841 census, she was born in Essex, England.

Also listed with James is his daughter, Eliza, who was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, she was born in about 1834. According to the 1841 census, she was born in Essex, England.

Also listed with James is his son, James, who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1841 census, he was born in about 1838. According to the 1841 census, he was born in Essex, England.

* * *

The 1841 Census for England was taken on the night of 6 June 1841. The following information was requested:

• Name of street, avenue, road, etc.
• House name or number
• Surname of head of household
• Name of persons who had spent the night in the household
• Age*
• Sex
• Person's occupation
• Where born**

*The ages of people over 15 years old were usually rounded down to the nearest 5 years. For example, someone who was actually 24 years would have their age listed as 20, and someone who was actually 27 years old would have their age listed as 25.

**The "Where Born" column only asked two questions - 1) whether born in same county, and 2) whether born in Scotland, Ireland, or Foreign Parts. Possible answers and abbreviations to question #1 include: Yes (Y), No, (N), or Not Known (NK). For question #2, the following abbreviations were used: Scotland (S), Ireland (I), and Foreign Parts (F).

Enumeration forms were distributed to all households a couple of days before census night and the household members were required to complete the forms themselves. The next day, the enumerators collected the completed forms. All responses were to reflect the individual's status as of 6 June 1841 for all individuals who had spent the night in the house. People who were traveling or living abroad were enumerated at the location where they spent the night on census night. All of the details from the individual forms were later sorted and copied into enumerators' books, which are the records we can view images of today. The original householders schedules from 1841 to 1901 were destroyed.

The clerks who compiled and reviewed the census data made a variety of marks on the returns. Unfortunately, many of these tally marks were written over personal information and some fields, such as ages, can be difficult to read as a result. More useful marks include a single slash between households within a building and a double slash separating households in separate buildings.

A major problem with the 1841 census is that it was written in pencil rather than pen. This has resulted in many faded pages which have proved unreadable on microfilm. 
FROST, James (I39023)
 
25157 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For James Frost in the Parish of Greenstead St Andrew (Greenstead-Juxta-Colchester)

Name: James Frost
Father's Name: Jacob Frost
Mother's Name: Alice
Date: 1st March 1796
Parish: Greenstead St Andrew (Greenstead-Juxta-Colchester)
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Jacob (I39024)
 
25158 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for John Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Peter

Name: John Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name Elizabeth
Date: 15th August 1676
Parish: Colchester St Peter
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, John (I38614)
 
25159 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For John Frost in the Parish of Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
Name: John Frost
Father's Name: John Ffrost
Date: 30th July 1693
Parish: Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, John (I38995)
 
25160 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for Jon Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Peter

Name: Jon Frost
Father's Name: Jon Frost
Mother's Name Ellesbeth
Date: 22nd January 1698[/99]
Parish: Colchester St Peter
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, John (I38616)
 
25161 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Martha Frost in the Parish of Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex

Name: Martha Frost
Father's Name: Samuell Frost
Mother's Name: Martha
Date: 26th March 1749
Parish: Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex
County: Essex

(2) D'Cruze, Shani, Ed., Essex in the Age of Enlightenment, 2009, p. xix:

Tombstone in Lexden churchyard records [William Redmore] Bigg's burial in a vault at St Giles-in-the Fields, but here is his wife Martha née Frost, daughter of a builder at Beaumont-cum-Moze, married at St Mary-at-the-Walls, 1784 (d. 1836) and their daughter Martha Elizabeth (d. 1867) who married Henry Vint esq. 
FROST, Martha (I39097)
 
25162 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Martha Frost in the Parish of Colchester All Saints

Name: Martha Frost
Father's Name: Thomas Frost
Mother's Name: Eleanor
Date: 16th March 1715[/6]
Parish: Colchester All Saints
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Martha (I39115)
 
25163 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Mary Frost in the Parish of Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex

Name: Mary Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name: Mary
Date: 6th April 1690
Parish: Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Mary (I38996)
 
25164 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Peter Sadler in the Parish of Bocking St Mary

Name: Peter Sadler
Father's Name: Peter Sadler
Date: 21st September 1715
Born Date: 29th August 1715
Parish: Bocking St Mary
County: Essex
Event: Baptism

[Note by compiler: Bocking, Essex, England is about 11 miles from Copford, Essex, England, where most of this child's siblings were christened.]

(2) Peter SADLER is mentioned in the will of his father, Peter SADLER, dated 14 September 1722. 
SADLER, Peter (I38695)
 
25165 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Richard Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Peter

Name: Richard Frost
Father's Name: Richard Frost
Mother's Name: Ann
Date: 11th October 1697
Parish: Colchester St Peter
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Richard (I39117)
 
25166 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Samuel Frost in the Parish of Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex

Name: Samuel Frost
Father's Name: Samuel Frost
Mother's Name: Martha
Date: 13th November 1752
Parish: Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex
County: Essex

(2) D'Cruze, Shani, Ed., Colchester People: The John Bensusan-Butt Biographical Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century Colchester, Vol. 1, 2nd Ed., 2010, p. 279:

The will of Samuel 2 (timber merchant, Beaumont) . . . , proved 24 November 1789.

On 10 January 1784 Martha (dtr) of St Mary-at-the-VValls spinster married William Redmore Bigg . . . , limner of Covent Garden. He is admitted to the Beaumont copyholds that year. She is buried Lexden 4 June 1836 aged 89. He is buried St Giles in the Fields 6 February 1828 aged 74.

. . . 5 October 1789, Samuel 2 advertised for 2 or 3 journeymen. . . . 3 February 1810, Dwellings in Beaumont and Great Oakley for sale, Samuel 2 being deceased. Detailed listing.

It may be noted that Martha Bigg was six or seven years older than her husband. They both shared an admiration for cottage life and diet, which shocked John Constable, though he was a loyal friend to old Bigg. . . .

Frost's copyhold buildings should be investigated for rateable value, occupants etc. They are on Guy's Hospital estates so John Yeldham, steward is relevant (JBB note: were the 300,000 bricks in 1765 for Guy's?). . . .

It is worth wondering if Charles Gray's . . . loan of James Deane's . . . builders' book of 1730 to Tristram Evans . . . Rector of Beaumont had to do with Frost's many building projects in 1765. . . .

(2) http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk:

Will of Samuel Frost, Timber Merchant of Beaumont, Essex

Reference: PROB 11/1185/204
Description: Will of Samuel Frost, Timber Merchant of Beaumont, Essex
Date: 24 November 1789
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record 
FROST, Samuel (I39019)
 
25167 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Samuell Frost in the Parish of Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex

Name: Samuell Frost
Father's Name: Samuell Frost
Mother's Name: Martha
Date: 26th August 1745
Parish: Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex
County: Essex

(2) The Genealogist :

Burial Record For Samuel Frost in the Parish of Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex

Name: Samuel Frost
Date: 18th March 1752
Father's Name: Samuel Frost
Mother's Name: Martha
Parish: Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Burial 
FROST, Samuel (I39022)
 
25168 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Susanna Frost In the Parish of Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex

Name: Susanna Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name: Mary
Date: 27th December 1691
Parish: Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Susanna (I38997)
 
25169 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For Susannah Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Giles

Name: Susannah Frost
Father's Name: Richard Frost
Mother's Name: Anne
Date: 28th April 1700
Parish: Colchester St Giles
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, Susannah (I39118)
 
25170 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for William Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Botolph

Name: William Frost
Father's Name: Thomas Frost
Mother's Name: Helena
Date: 19th August 1703
Born Date: 27th July 1703
Parish: Colchester St Botolph
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, William (I33752)
 
25171 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for William Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Peter

Name: William Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Date: 12th May 1706
Parish: Colchester St Peter
County: Essex
Event: Baptism 
FROST, William (I38617)
 
25172 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for William Frost in the Parish of Methley

Name: William Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name Marg Frost
Date: 18th January 1720[/21]
Parish: Methley
County: Yorkshire
Event: Baptism 
FROST, William (I38900)
 
25173 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for William Frost in the Parish of Richmond

Name: William Frost
Father's Name: Wiliam Frost
Father's Profesion: Labourer
Date: 7th April 1706
Parish: Richmond
County: Surrey
Event: Baptism 
FROST, William (I38896)
 
25174 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record For William Frost in the Parish of Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex

Name: William Frost
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name: Mary
Date: 17th October 1697
Parish: Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Baptism

(2) The Genealogist :

Burial Record For William Frost in the Parish of Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex

Name: William Frost
Date: 6th January 1703[/4]
Father's Name: John Frost
Mother's Name: Mary
Parish: Thorpe-Le-Soken St Michael, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Burial 
FROST, William (I38993)
 
25175 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for William Frost in the Parish of Wandsworth

Name: William Frost
Father's Name: William Frost
Date: 3rd May 1711
Parish: Wandsworth
County: Surrey
Event: Baptism 
FROST, William (I38898)
 
25176 (1) The Genealogist :

Baptism Record for Wm. Frost in the Parish of Launceston St. Mary Magdalene

Name: Wm. Frost
Relation: Son of
Father's Name: Wm. Frost
Date: 15th May 1718
Parish: Launceston St. Mary Magdalene
County: Cornwall
Event: Baptism 
FROST, William (I38903)
 
25177 (1) The Genealogist :

Burial Record For Martha Frost in the Parish of Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex

Name: Martha Frost
Date: 5th September 1754
Husband Name: Sam Frost
Parish: Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Burial 
GAYMER, Martha (I39020)
 
25178 (1) The Genealogist :

Death Record for Martha Elizabeth Vint in the District of Colchester

Name: Martha Elizabeth Vint
District: Colchester, Essex
Date of Birth (Calculated): 1789
Age: 78
Page: 0152
Volume: 4A
Registered: October - December 1867

(2) England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010, p. 37:

WILLS. 1868. . . .

VINT Martha Elizabeth.

Effects under £800.

3 January.

The Will with two Codicils of Martha Elizabeth Vint late of St. Mary's Lodge near Colchester in the County of Essex Widow deceased who died 24 October 1867 at St. Mary's Lodge aforesaid was proved at the Principal Registry by the oath of John Tomes of 37 Cavcndish-square in the County of Middlesex Esquire the surviving Executor. 
BIGG, Martha Elizabeth (I39100)
 
25179 (1) The Genealogist :

Marriage Record For John Frost & Mary Hurrell in the Parish of Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex

Groom's Name: John Frost
Bride's Name: Mary Hurrell
Groom's Parish: Thorpe Le Soke
Bride's Parish: Beaumont
Date: 18th June 1689
Parish: Beaumont-Cum-Moze St Leonard, Essex
County: Essex
Event: Marriage Record 
FROST, John (I38994)
 
25180 (1) The Genealogist :

Marriage Record For John Smith & Helen Frost in the Parish of Colchester St Mary At the Walls

Groom's Name: John Smith
Bride's Name: Helen Frost
Groom's Parish: Saffron Waldon
Bride's Parish: Ipswich
Groom's Condition
Single
Bride's Condition
Single
Date: 7th March 1705
Parish: Colchester St Mary At the Walls
County: Essex
Event: Marriage Record 
SMITH, John (I39127)
 
25181 (1) The Genealogist :

RG6: Quaker Registers 1578-1841:

Type: Birth
TNA Reference: RG6 / Piece 1526 / Folio 33
Full Name: Hannah Frost
Date of Birth: 4th October 1703
Registration Town/County: Nottingham, Nottinghamshire
Father's Name: Thomas Frost
Mother's Name: Mary Frost
Pedigree Chart: Father: Thomas Frost; Mother: Mary Frost

(2) England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013:

Name: Hannah Frost
Event Type: Birth
Birth Date: 4 Oct 1703
Birth Place: England
Gender: Female
Father: Tho Frost
Mother: Mary
Meeting: Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire
Piece Description: Piece 1368: Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire: Marriages (1664-1754
 
FROST, Hannah (I38582)
 
25182 (1) The Genealogist :

RG6: Quaker Registers 1578-1841:

Type: Birth
TNA Reference: RG6 / Piece 1526 / Folio 33
Full Name: John Frost
Date of Birth: 8th January 1704[/5]
Registration Town/County: Nottingham, Nottinghamshire
Father's Name: Thomas Frost
Mother's Name: Mary Frost
Pedigree Chart: Father: Thomas Frost; Mother: Mary Frost

(2) England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013:

Name: John Frost
Event Type: Birth
Birth Date: 8 Jan 1704[/5]
Birth Place: England
Gender: Male
Father: Thomas Frost
Mother: Mary Frost
Meeting: Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire
Piece Description: Piece 1526: Quarterly Meeting of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire (1647-1708)
 
FROST, John (I43038)
 
25183 (1) The Genealogist :

Type: Baptism
TNA Reference: RG4 / Piece 13 / Folio 10; Register of Births and Baptisms at the Presbyterian Congregation in Cullumpton, Devon from 1694 to 1786, with a Register of Marriages for 1696, and a Register of Burials from 1818 to 1823
Full Name: John Frost
Date of Baptism: 1st February 1699[/1700]
Gender: Male
Parish of Abode: Poneford Cullumbton
Registration Town/County: Devon
Father Name: John Frost 
FROST, John (I38578)
 
25184 (1) The Genealogist :

Type: Birth
TNA Reference: RG6 / Piece 1119 / Folio 46; Register of Births for the Monthly Meeting of Hull, Yorkshire from 1652 to 1774, with a Register of Marriages from 1656 to 1768, and a Register of Burials from 1656 to 1773
Full Name: Henry Frost
Gender: Male
Date of Birth: 19th April 1688
Registration Town/County: Hull, Yorkshire
Father Name: Henry Frost
Mother Name: Mary Frost 
FROST, Henry (I38608)
 
25185 (1) The Genealogist :

Type: Birth
TNA Reference: RG6 / Piece 1119 / Folio 46; Register of Births for the Monthly Meeting of Hull, Yorkshire from 1652 to 1774, with a Register of Marriages from 1656 to 1768, and a Register of Burials from 1656 to 1773
Full Name: Richard Frost
Gender: Male
Date of Birth: 3rd September 1689
Registration Town/County: Hull, Yorkshire
Father Name: Henry Frost
Mother Name: Mary Frost 
FROST, Richard (I38609)
 
25186 (1) The Genealogist :

Type: Burial
TNA Reference: RG4 / Piece 3989 / Folio 96
Register of Burials at Bunhill Fields Burial Ground, City Road, London from 1800 to 1803
Full Name: Richard Frost
Date of Burial: 21st November 1802
Gender: Male
Age: 50
Parish of Abode: Houndsditch
Registration Town/County: Bunhill Fields, London 
FROST, Richard (I39047)
 
25187 (1) The Gilkison surname and origins :

Miscellaneous notes

[Author's Note: Much of the following information is courtesy of Norman Gilkison, a native Scot living in Paisley, Scotland. Many thanks to Norman and his existing research!]

The early origins of the Gilkison surname are uncertain; a root of 'Gilchrist' is most likely [suggested by Dr. George V. Black, Surnames of Scotland]. The Anglified version of the name is 'Christopher.' Gilchrist is usually translated to mean 'servant of Christ'. Some research I have seen has therefore suggested that the name may have had its origins in some sort of localized religious group, and would have been used more as a title than a name, similar to the way Father or Sister are used in the Roman Catholic church.

There are, however, many more variations - Gilkeson, Gilkerson, Gilkersone, Gilchristson, Gilcriston, MacGilchrist, Gilchristoun, Gilkrisoune, Gilkcrissone, Kilkison, Kilcherson - and the list goes on. . . .

There could be some alternatives. Norman Gilkison states, "In my area until recently gilkie was a word to denote a teenager and it doesn't take much to add on a 'son'. However, people with the [Gilkison] surname didn't appear in this area until later, so that may be a coincidence."

There were three areas in the 1600s where the name was common, plus a few "stray sightings":

1. Argyllshire centred around Campbeltown
2. Lanarkshire and Glasgow
3. Ayrshire

If we accept Dr. Black's hypothesis on the Gilchrist origin, then the family lands lay around Strachur and St. Catherines on the eastern shore of Loch Fyne.

The Gilchrist clan was a sept of the MacLachlans who occupied land in Strathlachlan immediately to the south of the Gilchrists [according to Norman Gilkison, the Gilkisons currently use the MacLachlan tartans] . Another related sept is the MacEwan clan. These clans were Scots who migrated to Scotland from Northern Ireland with the Ardri (high king) Fergus McCool. They spoke Irish Gaelic which differed from the Welsh variety then spoken in Britain. Thus even to recent times, this language was referred to as "Irish" in West of Scotland documents. So anyone speaking this tongue going to America would be described as "Irish".

Some Gilkisons first appear in US and Canadian records in the 1700s, and their descendents are now wide spread across North America.

(2) Andrew GILKYSON changed the spelling of his surname to GILKESON "in later life," and that change appears in deeds and in his will.

(3) Carrell, Ezra Patterson, Descendants of James Carrell and Sarah Dungan, His Wife, Philadelphia, PA: International Printing Co., 1928, pp. 113-115:

EDITH GILBERT . . . married, November 26, 1776, by New Jersey license, Andrew Gilkyson, born 1750, died August 1, 1814.

She was a minor at the death of her father, and in 1773, when her father's real estate was adjudged to Joseph Hart in right of his wife Elizabeth, the eldest child of Nicholas and Esther Gilbert. The bond given by Hart to secure the share of Edith was filed in the Orphans' Court, and in 1805, her mother having died, this bond was satisfied by her husband, Andrew Gilkyson.

On April 21, 1778, Nathan Gilbert, the brother of Edith, conveyed to Andrew Gilkyson a farm of 60 acres and 60 perches in Northampton Township, Bucks County. On May 24, 1784, Andrew Gilkyson of Northampton Township, and Edith his wife conveyed this tract to James Edams.

An Esther Gilkyson is buried at Neshaminy Presbyterian graveyard, "Died September 12, 1792, aged 8 years." She was, without doubt, daughter either of Andrew and Edith, or of James and Rachel, as she bore the name of the mother of both Edith and Rachel.

Andrew and Edith Gilkeson removed to Upper Dublin Township about 1784, and resided for the remainder of their lives in that township. He was an innkeeper in 1790 when he and Edith conveyed a property on North Wales Road, he having been for several years proprietor of the inn at Gilkeson's Corner, at the intersection of the Butler Turnpike and the Bethlehem Road.

He owned several different properties in Gwynedd and Upper Dublin Townships.

He died in Upper Dublin Township, leaving will dated June 12, 1813, probated November 25, 1814, by which he devised to his son James his farm of 57 acres, whereon he lived, and an undivided one-eighth share in a farm of 109 acres purchased of Leonard and Ann Thomas, James to pay to his sister Esther $400 "if of age," otherwise to the executors, to be held by them until she came of age, also to pay to his mother Edith $56 per year during life, and at her death to pay Edith, wife of Jacob Wyce, and Esther, above mentioned, each $200.

To son Elias a house and five acres of land and $100 in cash, he to pay $10 annually to his mother during life.

To his son Andrew he devised a house and lot, part of the testator's dwelling-place purchased of Edward McVaugh, and a note he held against him of $581.85: he to pay $10 annually to his mother Edith, and at her death to pay $300 for use of his sister, Jane Fitzwater.

To his son Samuel a house and 11 acres of land in which the testator lived, subject to the payment of $400 each to his sisters Edith and Esther.

To daughter Edith he bequeathed $800. To daughter Jane Fitzwater, $400. To daughter Harriet, $700. To son Joseph, when of age, a lot of seven acres, subject to payment of $8 annually to his mother. His executors to sell remainder of his real estate out of which his wife was to have the income of $1000 for life; residue of his estate to sons James, Elias, Andrew, Samuel and Joseph, and daughters Edith, Esther and Harriet. The sons James, Andrew and Samuel were named as executors.

A codicil, dated December 16, 1813, gave additional legacies of £100 each to daughters Esther and Harriet.

Edith (Gilbert) Gilkeson died ____.

Andrew Gilkeson and several of his children are buried at the P. E. churchyard, White Marsh. He died August 1, 1814, in his sixty-fifth year.

CHILDREN OF ANDREW AND EDITH (GILBERT) GILKESON:

[i] James, b. June 27, 1781, d. Sept. 6, 1858; m. Ann _____.

[ii] Jane, b. ____, d. ____; m. David Fitzwater. No record except in father's will.

[iii] Andrew, b. Aug. 15, 1785, d. Nov. 11, 1857; m. Margaret Acuff.

[iv] Elias, b. ____, d. ____; m. Ann _____.

[v] Esther, No record except in father's will.

[vi] Samuel, b. ____, d. ____; m. Susan D. Palmer.

[vii] Edith, b. ____, d.____; m. Jacob Weiss. No record, except mentioned in his [her?] father's will.

[viii] Joseph, No record, except mentioned in his father's will; said to have lived in Philadelphia.

[ix] Harriet, b. ____, d. ____; m. Charles Meredith. No record except in father's will.

(4) A household headed by Andw. GILKINSON is listed in the 1790 census of Montgomery County, PA.

Listed in Andw.'s household are 2 free white males over 16 years of age; 3 free white males under 16 years of age; and 5 free white females.

Assuming that Andw. is one of the free white males listed in the 1790 census as then being over 16 years of age, he would have been born before 1774, according to the 1790 census.

Assuming that a son of Andw. is the other one of the free white males listed in the 1790 census as then being over 16 years of age, he would have been born before 1774, according to the 1790 census.

Assuming that sons of Andw. are the 3 free white males listed in the 1790 census as then being under 16 years of age, those sons would have been born between 1774 and 1790, according to the 1790 census.

The compiler is unable to identify the females listed in Andw.'s household in the 1790 census, because of the skimpy nature of the information provided about those females in that census.

(5) Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records, 1683-1993 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015:

Name: Andrew Gilkeson
Probate Date: 12 Jun 1813 [?]
Probate Place: Montgomery, Pennsylvania, USA
Inferred Death Year: Abt 1813 [?]
Inferred Death Place: Pennsylvania, USA
Item Description: Wills, Vol 3-5, 1808-1821

[Note by compiler: According to the decedent's probate record, his will was executed on 12 June 1813, and was proved on 25 November 1814.]

(6) www.findagrave.com:

Andrew Gilkeson
Birth: 1750
Death: Aug. 1, 1814

65y

Married Edith Gilbert 26 Nov 1776 in New Jersey.

Children:

• Jane Gilkeson Fitzwater (abt 1777-1853)
• Elias Gilkeson (abt 1779-____)
• James Gilkeson (1781-1858)
• Edith Gilkeson Weiss (1783-____)
• Joseph Gilkeson (1785-____)
• Harriet Gilkeson (1787-____)
• Andrew Gilkeson (1787-1854)
• Esther Gilkeson (abt 1789-____)
• Samuel Gilkeson (1791-1847)

Burial 3 Aug 1814.

Family links: Spouse: Edith Gilbert Gilkeson (1757 - 1840); Children: Jane Gilkeson Fitzwater (1777 - 1853), James Gilkeson (1781 - 1858), Andrew Gilkeson (1787 - 1854), Samuel Gilkeson (1791 - 1847), Samuel Gilkeson (1791 - 1847)

Inscription: In Memory of Andrew Gilkeson who departed this life August 1st 1811 [?] In the 65th year of his age. [Note by compiler: According to the decedent's probate record, his will was executed on 12 June 1813, and was proved on 25 November 1814.]

Burial: Saint Thomas Episcopal Church Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: Right Grave Row 1

Maintained by: Jo Roth
Originally Created by: Valerie Neidich Moran
Record added: Jan 29, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 64843484 
GILKESON, Andrew (I41351)
 
25188 (1) The Gilkison surname and origins :

Miscellaneous notes

[Author's Note: Much of the following information is courtesy of Norman Gilkison, a native Scot living in Paisley, Scotland. Many thanks to Norman and his existing research!]

The early origins of the Gilkison surname are uncertain; a root of 'Gilchrist' is most likely [suggested by Dr. George V. Black, Surnames of Scotland]. The Anglified version of the name is 'Christopher.' Gilchrist is usually translated to mean 'servant of Christ'. Some research I have seen has therefore suggested that the name may have had its origins in some sort of localized religious group, and would have been used more as a title than a name, similar to the way Father or Sister are used in the Roman Catholic church.

There are, however, many more variations - Gilkeson, Gilkerson, Gilkersone, Gilchristson, Gilcriston, MacGilchrist, Gilchristoun, Gilkrisoune, Gilkcrissone, Kilkison, Kilcherson - and the list goes on. . . .

There could be some alternatives. Norman Gilkison states, "In my area until recently gilkie was a word to denote a teenager and it doesn't take much to add on a 'son'. However, people with the [Gilkison] surname didn't appear in this area until later, so that may be a coincidence."

There were three areas in the 1600s where the name was common, plus a few "stray sightings":

1. Argyllshire centred around Campbeltown
2. Lanarkshire and Glasgow
3. Ayrshire

If we accept Dr. Black's hypothesis on the Gilchrist origin, then the family lands lay around Strachur and St. Catherines on the eastern shore of Loch Fyne.

The Gilchrist clan was a sept of the MacLachlans who occupied land in Strathlachlan immediately to the south of the Gilchrists [according to Norman Gilkison, the Gilkisons currently use the MacLachlan tartans] . Another related sept is the MacEwan clan. These clans were Scots who migrated to Scotland from Northern Ireland with the Ardri (high king) Fergus McCool. They spoke Irish Gaelic which differed from the Welsh variety then spoken in Britain. Thus even to recent times, this language was referred to as "Irish" in West of Scotland documents. So anyone speaking this tongue going to America would be described as "Irish".

Some Gilkisons first appear in US and Canadian records in the 1700s, and their descendents are now wide spread across North America.

(2) Jordan, John W., Encyclopedia of Pennsylvania Biography, Vol. IV, New York, NY: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1915, p. 1145:

James Gilkyson . . . came from the North of Ireland as a young man and settled in Wrightstown township, Bucks county. He was a Presbyterian of Scotch descent, and in 1775 he became a member of the Associated Company of Wrightstown, under Captain John Lacey. On May 6, 1777, he was commissioned first lieutenant of the First Company in the Fifth Battalion of Bucks county militia, under Colonel Joseph Mcllvaine, and with this company he doubtless was in active service. Prior to the Revolutionary War, James Gilkyson married Rachael, daughter of Nicholas and Esther (Craven) Gilbert, of Warminster township. The Gilbert family were among the first settlers in that township, Samuel Gilbert, an Englishman, having settled there before 1700. Here James Gilkyson purchased a small lot on the site of the famous Tennent Log College, on the Old York road, and then later moved to "Attlebury," now Langhorne, where he lived until 1794. In April of that year he purchased a farm of one hundred and fifty acres, near the present village of Edgewood, Lower Makefield township, and here lived for forty-six years, until his death in November, 1840, at the extreme age of ninety years. The old eight-day clock that belonged to James Gilkyson still marks the hours for his great-grandson in Phoenixville.

(3) Carrell, Ezra Patterson, Descendants of James Carrell and Sarah Dungan, His Wife, Philadelphia, PA: International Printing Co., 1928, pp. 110, 113:

Soon after the death of her [first] husband, Rachel (Gilbert) Polk took up her residence with her widowed mother Esther Gilbert, and there a child, Eleanor, was born December 26, 1775.

She probably continued to reside there until her marriage, by Pennsylvania license, dated January 8, 1780, to James Gilkyson of Middletown, Bucks County, the original License Bond being among the collections of the Bucks County Historical Society.

James Gilkyson, said by his descendants to have been a native of the North of Ireland, came to this country when a young man, and settled in Wrightstown Township. He was a member of the Associated Company of Wrightstown, of which General John Lacey was captain, in 1775, and on May 6, 1777, was commissioned First Lieutenant of the First Company of the Fifth Battalion, Bucks County Militia, under Colonel Joseph McElvaine, of which John Thompson was Captain.

James Gilkyson purchased a small lot on the York Road in Warminster, where he lived for a few years, when he removed to Attleboro, now Langhorne, where he lived until 1794. He was a tailor by trade, and followed that vocation until 1794, when he purchased a farm in Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County, near the village of Edgewood, upon which he lived until his death, in November, 1840, at the age of 90 years. His will, dated November 17, 1829, was filed for probate, November 28, 1840. It does not mention his wife, who evidently died before that date. . . .

CHILDREN OF JAMES AND RACHEL (GILBERT) GILKYSON:

[i] Andrew, b. 1780, d. Nov. 20, 1842; m. Sarah Larzalere.

[ii] Esther, b. 1784, d. Sept. 12, 1792; bur. at Neshaminy.

[iii] Samuel, b. ____, d. June __, 1652; m. Phebe _____.

[iv] Elias, b. 1789, d. Mar. 23, 1873; m. Elisabeth Wynkoop.

[v] Rachel, b. ____, d. ____; m. Aaron LaRue, of Yardley. 
GILKYSON, First Lt. James (I41372)
 
25189 (1) The Gilkison surname and origins :

Miscellaneous notes

[Author's Note: Much of the following information is courtesy of Norman Gilkison, a native Scot living in Paisley, Scotland. Many thanks to Norman and his existing research!]

The early origins of the Gilkison surname are uncertain; a root of 'Gilchrist' is most likely [suggested by Dr. George V. Black, Surnames of Scotland]. The Anglified version of the name is 'Christopher.' Gilchrist is usually translated to mean 'servant of Christ'. Some research I have seen has therefore suggested that the name may have had its origins in some sort of localized religious group, and would have been used more as a title than a name, similar to the way Father or Sister are used in the Roman Catholic church.

There are, however, many more variations - Gilkeson, Gilkerson, Gilkersone, Gilchristson, Gilcriston, MacGilchrist, Gilchristoun, Gilkrisoune, Gilkcrissone, Kilkison, Kilcherson -and the list goes on. . . .

There could be some alternatives. Norman Gilkison states, "In my area until recently gilkie was a word to denote a teenager and it doesn't take much to add on a 'son'. However, people with the [Gilkison] surname didn't appear in this area until later, so that may be a coincidence."

There were three areas in the 1600s where the name was common, plus a few "stray sightings":

1. Argyllshire centred around Campbeltown
2. Lanarkshire and Glasgow
3. Ayrshire

If we accept Dr. Black's hypothesis on the Gilchrist origin, then the family lands lay around Strachur and St. Catherines on the eastern shore of Loch Fyne.

The Gilchrist clan was a sept of the MacLachlans who occupied land in Strathlachlan immediately to the south of the Gilchrists [according to Norman Gilkison, the Gilkisons currently use the MacLachlan tartans] . Another related sept is the MacEwan clan. These clans were Scots who migrated to Scotland from Northern Ireland with the Ardri (high king) Fergus McCool. They spoke Irish Gaelic which differed from the Welsh variety then spoken in Britain. Thus even to recent times, this language was referred to as "Irish" in West of Scotland documents. So anyone speaking this tongue going to America would be described as "Irish".

Some Gilkisons first appear in US and Canadian records in the 1700s, and their descendents are now wide spread across North America.

(2) "John Gilkison (abt. 1720 - aft. 1782)" :

John Gilkison

Born about 1720 in Ireland

Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]

[Sibling(s) unknown]

Husband of Jennie Williams - married [date unknown] [location unknown]

Father of William Gilkison, James Gilkinson and John Gilkison

Died after 1782 in Greenbrier County, Virginia

Profile manager: Linda Artuso

Biography

John Sr. was a customer of the Mathews Trading Post on the Greenbrier River in Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1771, along with John Jr. and William (who was identified as the son of John Sr.) John Jr. is, therefore, assumed to be John Sr.'s nephew rather than his son.

These three men plus a James Gilkison (also assumed to be a son of John Sr.) appeared as tithables on the Great Levels of Spring Creek in Botetourt Co. in 1774 and 1775. (List of Tithables, 1779-1789, Botetourt Co., VA, FHL Film #1906467).

John Sr. had 165 acres of land in Botetourt Co. lying on the waters of Greenbrier surveyed for him on 7 Feb 1774 (Virginia Land Office, Greenbrier Company Surveys, 1751-1776, Box No. 2, Entry 121.3), but his name never appeared in the Greenbrier Land Tax Book.

Sources

Birth: Year is just a guesstimate based on the fact that John had grown sons by 1770. Place is based on this statement: "In the beginning the Gilkisons migrated from Scotland to the north of Ireland. From there two brothers came to America and landed at North Carolina." (Genealogy of the Coffinberry Family, by Beatrice B. Scott, p. 31)

Marriage: The Genealogy of the Coffinberry Family (cited below) indicates that a Gilkison was married to Jennie Williams. This would apply to John, rather than his son James, because James married Elizabeth Currens 9 Sep 1783 in Greenbrier Co. This assertion is confirmed by the fact that a John Williams was identified as a son of Gilkison in the Mathews Trading Post record. John Williams was later listed in the 1810 census of Fleming Co., KY, where the John who is included as John Sr.'s son in his Profile also resided. He was also a witness at the marriage of the younger John's daughter Sarah in Fleming Co. in 1799.

Death: John "Senior's" name last appeared on the 1782 tax list of Greenbrier County, Virginia (now West Virginia).

(3) Scott, Beatrice Berman, Genealogy of the Coffinberry Family [Reprint], Cleveland, OH: F. A. Myers, 1952, pp. 31-34:

In the beginning the Gilkisons migrated from Scotland to the north of Ireland. From there two brothers [unnamed by this source] came to America and landed at North Carolina. One of these brothers afterwards settled in Virginia and one in Greenup County, Kentucky. He had three sons named Jonathon, James, John. He made a living by hunting and trapping. When the settlement grew more populated and game scarce he would move to a new district or region.

It was after one of these moves that the boys, James and John, were lost in the woods. It was solid forest for miles, the time of the year, fall. The boys took a grain sack and went into the edge of the woods to see if they could find some nuts. They were accompanied by their dog. James was eight years of age and John was ten.

Soon after reaching the woods the dog began barking at something and the boys ran to see what he had treed, but he was on the trail of some, wild animal and led them far into the woods. Naturally they became bewildered and lost. When night came it began to drizzle and remained that kind of weather all the days that they were lost.

The father looked for them the first night, the next day he got the aid of some hunters. The third day the dog came home in the night. The hunters thought that if they had seen him when he came they might have been able to send him back again, but in the morning he could not understand what they wished him to do. The father then went back to the settlement and got together a hundred men, they killed a beef, divided the meat among them and began hunting. This routine was gone through every morning until the evening of the eighth day, when the men decided it was no use to hunt any longer and so gave up the hunt.

In the meantime the little boys were traveling trying to find a way out of the forest which contained many honey locust trees. It was upon the pods of these trees that the boys lived on as they could find neither berries nor nuts. They suffered most for want of water. Although it drizzled all the time not enough water came down for them to get a taste. Not knowing any better, they tried to quench their thirst from the water on their own bodies. By so doing they thus made their thirst greater.

By this time, little James had become so weak he could not walk much and coaxed his brother to quit traveling and lie down and die, but the brother would not consent to the proposition and he helped the little brother along the best he could.

Their feet were very sore, full of thorns; their clothing damp: their throats sore and swollen.

The morning of the ninth day the sun shone for the first time since they were out. Greatly encouraged, John said: "I thought I heard nuts dropping in the night and I'm going up on the hill to see if I can find some, you stay here." But James did not wish to stay alone and cried, so they went together up the hill.

James was now so weakened that he crawled on his hands and knees, in fact. John went that way some of the time as their feet were so swollen and festered by thorne. All the time they were out they never saw a berry or a nut and the locust pods had become so sickening to them. On the top of the hill they came to a sort of an open space sodded over and a nice log for a resting place. To the right of them there appeared to be an old trail sodded here and there.

On the morning of the ninth day three Hunters (by profession ) who had been in the hunt for the boys, decided that they would get some of the deer which seemed to be plentiful. One of these Hunters, John Creighton by name, came up this grassy slope in his hunt for deer and came full upon the boys.

Little James was nibbling on a locust pod. The Hunter blew his horn and then took the boys to a creek where he broke off a small piece of corn bread about the size of a walnut and soaked it in the water, then broke off half and divided it between the two boys. The coarse bread scratched their throats as it went down and the boys cried out in pain. Little James cried for more, but on account of their nearly starved condition the hunter did not dare give the children any more just at that time.

The other hunters hearing the horn came up. The blowing of the horn had been a signal previously agreed on if one of them needed help, so they loaded the boys on the horses already loaded with deer and started homeward. The boys, when found, were about forty miles from home.

The hunters, on arriving home with the boys, found that the father had gone on foot to a camp of Indians some twenty miles away, which was a dangerous undertaking, on account of the Indians being partly hostile. He did not find his boys there. They were nowhere about camp, so he turned towards home.

When Mrs. Gilkison opened the door in response to the hunters' rap on the door with his foot, and he said: "Mrs. Gilkison, how would you like a couple of boys?" That lady promptly threw up her hands and fainted. So he not only had to unload the boys, but had to resusticate her. As soon as she regained her senses she began to make a comfortable place for the boys. She placed a feather bed on the floor by the stove, but the hunter interferred, saying: "My good woman, you cannot do that. Put a blanket on the floor as far away from the stove as possible. Let the boys lie on that, nothing over them. I was lost once and found by Indians and I have done for your boys just as they treated me. He also told her how to feed them and cautioned her that any diversion from his directions might cause the death of one or both.

There was no place on the feet of the boys that a pin could not be placed without coming in contact with thorns. They could not get a shoe on all winter, there were yet thorns in their feet when spring came - after picking thorns all winter.

The three Gilkison boys settled in Ohio. After a while Jonathon settled in Illinois at Mt. Carmel and James later at Centreville, Michigan. James was justice of peace in Mansfield for over thirty years and resigned to move to Michigan. . . .

The father of James M. Gilkison had four half-brothers and two sisters. Their names were Joseph, Mathew, Alick and Stephen Curren; the two sisters were Aunt Sallie Coffinberry and Mrs. Bradshaw. His wife's name was Jennie Williams.

(4) Handley, Harry E., "The Mathews Trading Post," Journal of the Greenbrier Historical Society, Vol. 1, No. 1 (August 1963), pp. 8-14:

THE first trading post, or store, within the confines of the present limits of Greenbrier, for which there is any known record, was owned by Sampson and George Mathews, and is said to have been located on the Greenbrier River, not far from the mouth of Howards Creek, at or near the shallows in the river now known as Mathews Ford.

Two of the Day Books, in which were kept an accounting of the charges for purchases made and credits for produce sold to the store, have survived. They cover the time interval 8 April 1771 to 26 Jan. 1773.

The names of many of the customers appear only once during the more than twenty-one months covered by the two books, but the names of others appear repeatedly, and from the various entries it is possible to gain considerable insight into the tenor of community life in this frontier area. It is proposed to explore this approach in considerable detail in a future article, but for the present only the names of those mentioned in the two books are being given, followed by the month and year of the first mention, the month and year of last mention, and occasional notation of relations or associates and types of purchases and sales. Names are spelled as shown on the first entry, with later spellings indicated in parentheses.

Sampson and George Mathews were two of the sons of Capt. John Mathews, who with his family settled to the south of the Borden Grant, between Lexington and Buena Vista, in the present Rockbridge County, Va., during the period 1730-1737. Mention is made of other stores operated by the Mathews contemporaneously with the one in Greenbrier, which were located in Staunton and on the Cowpasture.

Customers at the Greenbrier trading post included: . . .

• Gilkeson, John, Jr. - Oct. '72 - Jan.'73 (sleeve buttons, leggins)

• Gilkison, John, Sr. (Guilkeson, Gilkeson) Apr. '71 - Jan. '73 (lead, tobac., ribbon by wife)

• Gilkison, Wm. (Son of John Sr.) April '71 - Oct. '72 (3 good cat skins). . . . 
GILKISON, John Sr. (I41518)
 
25190 (1) The Hales Newsletter, New Series, Vol. 3, No. 3 (Autumn 1997):

Parish Register Extracts . . .

Lenham, Kent, England Christenings . . .

27 JAN 1622 Edward, son of John Hales, Gent.

(2) Hales, Thomas Glyn, The Hales Chronicles, 3rd Ed., Tucson, AZ: Privately Printed, 2008, p. 299:

Edward HALES

Christened 27 JAN 1622 at Lenham, Kent, England the son of John HALES and Margaret TOOKE. Of Milstead, Kent, England in 1624 and of Boughton Malherbe, Kent, England in 1628. This Edward is said to have emigrated to Virginia in 1665 and died there about 1690 in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

Children:

M- John HALES; born about 1648 in Kent, England; died 1714.

(3) In John HALES' will dated 14 May 1634, he described Edward HALES as one of his four youngest sons. Edward served as administrator of his father's estate because the executor named in the will died before 5 May 1651, when the will was proven. It would have been very difficult for Edward to have administered this English estate from VA. Therefore, the compiler assumes that Edward was still in England as of 5 May 1651.

(4) On 5 November 1999, Forrest HALE, Sr. posted a message to the HALE-L mailing list on Rootsweb.com, stating that in 1997 he and Lewis HALES, another HALE researcher, had employed two English genealogists to research the family consisting of John HALES, Margaret TOOKE and their children. Forrest HALE, Sr. further stated that based upon what these researchers found (and did not find) in England, and upon Virginia records, these researchers concluded that two of the HALES sons, Edward and Richard, were the same persons who eventually settled in Virginia. These researchers' conclusions were based on the circumstantial evidence of these sons' appearance in Virginia at about the same time records about them vanished in England, their ages, and their use of family naming patterns in naming their children. [Note by compiler: Based on information in Hales, Thomas Glyn, The Hales Chronicles, 3rd Ed., Tucson, AZ: Privately Printed, 2008, p. 1321, it appears that these English researchers' conclusions about Richard HALES were wrong; he reportedly died in England in 1672.]

(5) Thousands of Virginia's early settlers arrived in the colony as a result of the headright system. Under this system, anyone who paid for his transportation (or someone else's transportation) to Virginia was entitled to receive 50 acres of land for each immigrant transported to Virginia at his expense. In order to receive a land patent under the headright system, an individual would petition the county court for certification of these rights. The certificate was then recorded in the county court minute books. The petition for a certificate was usually filed soon after the arrival of the immigrants, while proofs of the claim where fresh. The documents certifying these rights, formally termed "transportation rights," but commonly called "headrights," were used as paper currency and freely sold, bartered or assigned to others at or near the time of certification. For that reason they could have remained in circulation for a considerable time before ultimately being "tendered" for land. Before 1705, these rights could have been claimed for multiple arrivals of the same person.

(6) On 1 September 1653, Col. William CLAYBORNE, Esq., Secretary of State of the Colony of VA, claimed a headright for transporting an Edward HALE into VA. See Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Vol. I [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, pp. 244-245. [The compiler does not know whether that Edward HALE was the same person as the Edward HALES who was christened on 27 January 1622 in Lenham, Kent, England, and was a son of John HALES and Margaret TOOKE.]

(7) On 29 November 1658, Robert COLLINS claimed a headright for transporting an Edward HALES into Northumberland County, VA. See Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Vol. I [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, pp. 382-383. [The compiler does not know whether that Edward HALES was the same person as the Edward HALES who was christened on 27 January 1622 in Lenham, Kent, England, and was a son of John HALES and Margaret TOOKE.]

(8) On 1 August 1665, Thomas WRIGHT claimed a headright for transporting an Edw. HAILE into VA. See Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Vol. I [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, p. 382-383. [The compiler does not know whether that Edw. HAILE was the same person as the Edward HALES who was christened on 27 January 1622 in Lenham, Kent, England, and was a son of John HALES and Margaret TOOKE.] 
HAILE, Edward (I220)
 
25191 (1) The History of Adams County, Illinois, Chicago, IL: Murray, Williamson & Phelps, 1879, p. 658:

McCLINTICK W. L., grain buyer; office, Hampshire street, between 7th and 8th; residence, 25th, between Hampshire and Maine; born in Montgomery county, Ky., in 1817; located in Putnam county, Ind., in 1830, and in Quincy in 1835; married Margaret Thomas in 1845. She was born in Bourbon county, Ky., in 1824. They have five children: Shelby, Robert, Lucy, Daniel, and Ann. He is a Republican. He has been in the grain business since 1868; was in the plumbing and gas-fitting business up to that time. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

(2) A household headed by William S. McCLINTICK is listed in the 1850 census of Richfield, Adams County, IL.

William is listed in the 1850 census as a farmer who was then 33 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1817. According to the 1850 census, he was born in KY.

Listed with William is his wife, Margaret, who was then 26 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1824. According to the 1850 census, she was born in KY.

Also listed with William is his son, Shelley, who was then 4 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1846. According to the 1850 census, he was born in IL. [The compiler believes that "Shelley's" name was really Shelby.]

Also listed with William is his son, Robert, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1848. According to the 1850 census, he was born in IL.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Frances, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1848. According to the 1850 census, she was born in IL.

(3) A household headed by Wm. S. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1860 census of Ward 5, Quincy, Adams County, IL. ["Wm." is erroneously listed as "Ther" in the index to the 1860 census.]

Wm. is listed in the 1860 census as a teamster who was then 44 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1816. According to the 1860 census, he was born in KY.

Listed with Wm. is his wife, Margaret, who was then 36 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1824. According to the 1860 census, she was born in KY.

Also listed with Wm. is his son, Louis S., who was then 14 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1846. According to the 1860 census, he was born in IL.

Also listed with Wm. is his son, Thos. R., who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1848. According to the 1860 census, he was born in IL.

Also listed with Wm. is his daughter, Lucy F., who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1855. According to the 1860 census, she was born in IL.

Also listed with Wm. is his son, Daniel, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1858. According to the 1860 census, he was born in IL.

(4) A household headed by William S. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1870 census of Ward 2, Quincy, Adams County, IL.

William is listed in the 1870 census as a gas fitter who was then 53 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1817. According to the 1870 census, he was born in KY.

Listed with William is his wife, Margaret, who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1824. According to the 1870 census, she was born in KY.

Also listed with William is his son, William R., a painter who was then 22 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1848. According to the 1870 census, he was born in IL.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Lucy, who was then 14 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1856. According to the 1870 census, she was born in IL.

Also listed with William is his son, Daniel, who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1859. According to the 1870 census, he was born in IL.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Julia A., who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1861. According to the 1870 census, she was born in IL.

(5) A household headed by William S. McCLINTICK is listed in the 1880 census of Quincy, Adams County, IL.

William is listed in the 1880 census as a grain buyer who was then 64 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1816. According to the 1880 census, he was born in KY, and both of his parents were born in KY.

Listed with William is his wife, Margaret, who was then 56 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1824. According to the 1880 census, she was born in KY, and both of her parents were born in KY.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Lucy F., who was then 24 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1856. According to the 1880 census, she was born in Quincy, Adams County, IL, and both of her parents were born in KY.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Ann J., who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1862. According to the 1880 census, she was born in Quincy, Adams County, IL, and both of her parents were born in KY. 
McCLINTICK, William L. (I40682)
 
25192 (1) The History of Estienne Cheneau/Stephen Chenault and His Descendants :

The Immigrant, Estienne Cheneau

The date and location of the birth of Estienne Cheneau have not been positively determined, but some assumptions can be made from information that is known about him. He is listed on the manifest of the Nassau, which landed in Yorktown, Virginia, on 5 Mar 1700/1701. The entry is in French and is shown as Estienne Cheneau et sa femme, inferring the immigrant arrived with his wife, but without children. It has generally been assumed by most researchers that they were probably married not long before departing for the New World. This assumption led early researchers to the probability that Estienne was born no later than about 1680, thus being about 20-21 years old when he arrived in America. However, many current researchers now believe he may possibly have been born as early as 1665-1670 if he was about 50 years old at the time of his death, which was the average life expectancy in the time he lived.

As to the location of his birth, it was likely not in France as previously assumed, although his parents descended from French Huguenots. Earlier research proposed that he was born and raised in the Province Languedoc, a few miles west of Marseille. The small city of Nimes, with Avignon nearby, and the mouth of the Rhone, were thought to have been his habitat. However, this does not seem to be plausible. Aboard the Nassau, which was the fourth ship funded by the Protestant Relief Fund in England to relocate Huguenots to America, were 191 Huguenot passengers from the continent. The origin of the passengers aboard each of the four vessels that were part of the effort, however, differed. Thus, most researchers agree that Estienne's being in the fourth group indicates that he was most likely born in the Netherlands to parents descended for French Huguenots, who probably had fled the persecutions in France by possibly as much as a century before his death. And, because they fled to the Netherlands, they likely were from the northern regions of France rather than the Province Languedoc.

A petition dated 19 Apr 1707 and written in French and submitted to Colonel Edmund Jennings, Chairman of the Executive Council in Virginia on behalf of resident of Manakin, Virginia, by C. Philippe de Richebourg, Minister of the Huguenots in Manakin, confirms that Estienne went to Manakin after debarking the Nassau and resided there for at least six years as his is one of five signatures that appear on the petition besides that of Richebourg. Prior to the discovery of the petition several months ago, researchers did not believe that Estienne went to Manakin, but proceeded to Essex County and settled there. Evidently, this was incorrect.

This discovery reveals several other things about Estienne. He was able to sign his name on the petition, so now it is a mystery as to why he could manage only an "X" on the earliest documents in Essex County in 1714. Also, it appears to give merit to the belief of current researchers that his marriage to a Miss Howlett would have been his second marriage, which occurred more than six years after landing in America, since only Huguenots were in Manakin, and Miss Howlett was from an English family long in America. William Howlett was a neighbor to the Chenaults in Essex County. Thus, Estienne's son, Howlett, thought to be named for his mother's maiden name, would not have been born before about 1708 and more likely a couple of years or so later.

Estienne shows up in public records for the first time as Stephen Chenault, the Anglicized version of his name, in Essex County, Virginia in 1714. It is presumed that like most of the traditional Huguenots, he departed Manakin shortly after the 1707 petition, which was rejected by the Council. His whereabouts until he is found in 1714 are unknown. While he could have moved on to Essex County at that time, there is no record of him there. He may have moved to North or South Carolina for a while as did some of the Huguenots, but again nothing substantiates this. Judging by the assumed date of birth of Howlett being about 1712, Estienne, now using the Anglicized Stephen Chenault, must have been in Essex County and married to Howlett's mother by about 1711.

Early researchers of the family have disagreed about the number of children fathered by Estienne. Current opinion is that only three are confirmed in public records. He had one son, Stephen, his first-born, by his first wife who arrived with him in America. This son was born shortly after their arrival at Manakin. It is not know what became of his first wife or if there were other children born to them. It is believed that Estienne, then known as Stephen, married a second time to Miss Howlett about 1711. They had two sons, Howlett and John. Both Howlett and John died as young adults. Both were married and had small children when they died. Howlett's widow, Mary, remarried to William Ballard, which qualified the two of them to serve as co-executors of Howlett's estate.

Estienne is believed to have died within 2-3 years after 1715, when his witnessing of the will, above, demonstrates he was then still living. From 1720 forward, the references to Stephen Chenault in public records in the area are believed to refer to the son of the immigrant, who bore the same name. 
CHENAULT, Stephen Sr. (I37379)
 
25193 (1) The History of Madison County, Ohio, Chicago, IL: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883, p. 1049:

WILSON A. HOUSMAN, merchant, Danville. . . . William A. . . remained with his parents until he reached his majority, when he rented a farm, which he operated eight years, and at the death of his father he carried on merchandising in connection with his farming. In 1878, he married Eliza McLean, by whom he has had two children. In connection with his brother, he operates a large tile factory at Danville, which they built in 1882, and in which they manufacture extensively drain tile of all sizes. They also carry on a store in Danville. Mr. Housman is a Democrat in politics. His grandparents emigrated from Virginia at an early day, and located in Madison County.

[Note by compiler: It is not clear from this source whether Mr. HOUSMAN's first name was Wilson or William.]

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Wilson Howsmon
Birth: Jul., 1848, Ohio, USA
Death: Mar. 3, 1901, Jackson County, Missouri, USA

[Note by compiler: Wilson's surname is spelled "Howsmon" on his tombstone.]

Father was George Howsmon (b. 1823) Ohio and Rebecca (b.1828 Ohio) Howsmon

Family links: Parents: George M Howsmon (1822 - 1876), Rebecca Howsmon (1827 - 1856); Spouse: Eliza Howsmon (1846 - 1913); Siblings: Rebecca J Howsmon, Isaac T. Howsmon (1846 - 1935), Wilson Howsmon (1848 - 1901), John Lemon Howsmon (1853 - 1937)

Burial: Forest Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, USA

Created by: Tom Denardo
Record added: May 14, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 110520992 
HOWSMON, Wilson A. (I18639)
 
25194 (1) The History of Madison County, Ohio, Chicago, IL: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883, p. 453-454:

Dr. William McClintick, a brother to Dr. Samuel McClintick, of Mt. Sterling, Ohio, was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, near Zanesville, in 1817. He studied medicine with Dr. James F. Wilson, of New Holland, Ohio, and located in Mt. Sterling, Ohio, in 1840, where he practiced for about twenty years. He graduated at Starling Medical College in 1848. He bought a farm two miles east of Danville, and moved to it in 1860, where he died November 21, 1871, of cancer. He was a good physician. Danville was a good point and his excessive labor in his profession probably brought an untimely death. In 1842, he married Hannah Reeves, who died in 1845 without issue. In 1847, he married Fannie Reeves, sister to his first wife, who, with two daughters and one son, still live at the home farm.

(2) A household headed by William McCLINTICK is listed in the 1850 census of Mount Sterling, Madison County, OH.

William is listed in the 1850 census as a physician who was then 32 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1818. According to the 1850 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with William is his wife, Frances, who was then 23 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1827. According to the 1850 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his son, Thomas R., who was then 4 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1846. According to the 1850 census, he was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Martha, who was then 1 year of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1849. According to the 1850 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William are 3 apparently unrelated persons.

(3) A household headed by William McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1860 census of Range Township, Madison County, OH.

William is listed in the 1860 census as a physician who was then 43 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1817. According to the 1860 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with William is his wife, Frances C., who was then 33 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1827. According to the 1860 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Hanah A., who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1843. According to the 1860 census, she was born in OH. [Hanah, who was not listed in this household in the 1850 census, may have been a daughter of William and his first wife.]

Also listed with William is his son, Thomas R., who was then 14 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1846. According to the 1860 census, he was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Martha, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1850. According to the 1860 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Frances, who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1855. According to the 1860 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his son, William, who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1857. According to the 1860 census, he was born in OH.

(4) A household headed by William McCLINTICK is listed in the 1870 census of Range Township, Madison County, OH. [The page of the 1870 census on which this household is listed is so faint that it is barely readable.]

William is listed in the 1870 census as a physician who was then 52 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1818. According to the 1870 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with William is his wife, Frances C., who was then 42 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1828. According to the 1870 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his son, Thomas R., who was then 23 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1847. According to the 1870 census, he was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Martha, who was then 19 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1851. According to the 1870 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his daughter, Frances, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1855. According to the 1870 census, she was born in OH.

Also listed with William is his son, William, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1858. According to the 1870 census, he was born in OH.

Also listed with William is an apparently unrelated farm laborer.

(5) www.findagrave.com:

Dr William McClintock
Birth: 1817
Death: 1872

[Note by compiler: William's surname is spelled "McClintock" on his tombstone.]

Family links: Children: Hannah A McClintock Beale (1843 - 1926)

Burial: Kirkwood Cemetery, London (Madison County), Madison County, Ohio, USA

Created by: Dave
Record added: Sep 03, 2005
Find A Grave Memorial# 11668462 
McCLINTOCK, William (I36314)
 
25195 (1) The History of Madison County, Ohio, Chicago, IL: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883, p. 454:

Dr. Thomas Reeves McClintick was born in Mt. Sterling, Madison Co., Ohio, in 1848, read medicine with his father, Dr. William McCIintick, and graduated at the Medical College of Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1870. He lived on his father's farm until 1877, when he married Sarah Howsman, and then moved into the village of Danville. In 1880, he moved to Kansas City, Mo., where he has a good practice.

(2) A household headed by Thomas McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1880 census of Ward 3, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO.

Thomas is listed in the 1880 census as a physcian and surgeon who was then 34 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1846. According to the 1880 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in NY[?].

Listed with Thomas is his wife, Sarah, who was then 29 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1851. According to the 1880 census, she was born in OH. The birthplaces of her parents are not listed in the 1880 census.

(3) A household headed by Thomas R. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1900 census of Ward 10, Kansas City, MO.

Thomas R. is listed in the 1900 census as a doctor who was born in 1847 and was then 53 years of age. [The month of his birth is not listed in the 1900 census.] According to the 1900 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in PA [?]. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married 23 years.

Listed with Thomas R. is his wife, Sarah, who was born in November 1850 and was then 49 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in OH, and both of her parents were born in OH. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married 23 years. There is no indication in the 1900 census that she had theretofore given birth to any children.

Also listed with Thomas R. is an apparently unrelated servant.

(4) Dr. Thomas R. McCLINTOCK is listed in a household headed by John F. [or H.] LINDEN in the 1910 census of Ward 10, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO. [According to the 1910 census, Dr. McCLINTOCK was the uncle of Mr. LINDEN's wife, Anna M. LINDEN.]

Dr. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1910 census as a physician who was then a widower and who was then 54 [?] years of age; therefore, according to the 1910 census, he was born in about 1856 [?]. According to the 1910 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in OH.

(5) A household headed by Thomas McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1920 census of Ward 10, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO. [The page of the 1920 census on which this household is listed is so faint that it is barely readable.]

Thomas is listed in the 1920 census as a physician who was then a widower and who was then 73 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1847. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in OH.

Listed with Thomas is his niece, May LINDEND, a widow who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1874. According to the 1920 census, she was born in NY, and both of her parents were born in NY.

Also listed with Thomas is his nephew, Henry REVAREND, a salesman who was then 26 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1894. According to the 1920 census, he was born in KS, his father was born in NY, and his mother was born in Belgium.

Also listed with Thomas is his niece, Hazel REVAREND, a secretary who was then 25 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1895. According to the 1920 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in MO, and her mother was born in NY.

Also listed with Thomas is his niece, Anna REVAREND, who was then 4-2/12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1915. According to the 1920 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in KS, and her mother was born in MO.

Also listed with Thomas is his niece, Thankful CATES, a nurse who was then 70 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1850. According to the 1920 census, she was born in MA, and both of her parents were born in MA.

(6) Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929 [database online], Provo, Utah: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2004:

Name: Thomas Reeves McClintock
Birth Date: 1846
Death Date: 6 Apr 1927
Death Place: Kansas City, MO
Type Practice: Allopath
Practice Specialities: Kansas City, MO, 1870
Licenses: MO, 1883, KS, 1910
Practice Dates Places: Kansas City, MO, 1870
Medical School: Medical College of Ohio, Cincinnati: Cincinnati Medical College, 1870, (G)
Death Notice Info: Kansas City, MO, Sep 17, 1928, Anna May Linden
Cause of Death: surgery, complications, prostatic gland

(7) www.findagrave.com:

Dr Thomas Reeves McClintock
Birth: Mar. 15, 1846, Ohio, USA
Death: Apr. 8, 1927, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, USA

Parents were William and Fannie (Reeves) McClintock. . . .

Family links: Spouse: Sarah McClintock (1850 - 1905)

Burial: Forest Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, USA

Created by: Tom Denardo
Record added: May 12, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 110417515 
McCLINTOCK, Dr. Thomas Reeves (I18640)
 
25196 (1) The History of Madison County, Ohio, Chicago, IL: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883, pp. 443, 1032-1033:

Dr. Samuel McClintick was bom February 1, 1821, in Pickaway County, Ohio. He is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth McClintick. His father was a native of Ireland, and his mother of Pennsylvania.

* * *

SAMUEL McCLINTICK, physician, Mt. Sterling. The subject of this sketch, a leading physician of Madison County, was born February 1, 1821, in Pickaway County, Ohio. His parents were Joseph and Elizabeth McClintick, his father a native of Ireland, and his mother of Pennsylvania. They came to Pickaway County in an early day. 
McCLINTICK, Joseph (I36317)
 
25197 (1) The History of Madison County, Ohio, Chicago, IL: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883, pp. 443, 1032-1033:

Dr. Samuel McClintick was bom February 1, 1821, in Pickaway County, Ohio. He is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth McClintick. His father was a native of Ireland, and his mother of Pennsylvania. He commenced the study of medicine in 1841, under his brother, William, and J. F. Wilson, of New Holland, Pickaway Co., Ohio. He attended a course of lectures at Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, during the session of 1844-45, and located in Mt. Sterling in April, 1845, where he still resides. He married, May 20, 1846, Miss Louisa C. Kauffelt.

* * *

SAMUEL McCLINTICK, physician, Mt. Sterling. The subject of this sketch, a leading physician of Madison County, was born February 1, 1821, in Pickaway County, Ohio. His parents were Joseph and Elizabeth McClintick, his father a native of Ireland, and his mother of Pennsylvania. They came to Pickaway County in an early day. Our subject was reared in Pickaway County. Although he engaged in agricultural pursuits until he was twenty years of age, he succeeded in acquiring a liberal English education. At the above age, he began the study of medicine, spending a portion of the time with his brother, William McClintick, then at Mt. Sterling, and the other portion with J. F. Wilson, then located at New Holland, Pickaway County. During the latter portion of 1844, and the beginning of 1845, for five months he attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati. In April, 1845, he located at Mt. Sterling, and began the practice of his profession, in which he has met with abundant success. He is reliable and conscientious in the discharge of his duties, and for many years has enjoyed a large patronage. In connection with his professional duties, he also has under his control and management, a fine drug store which is largely patronized. He has served as Treasurer of Pleasant Township three years, and as such still officiates. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and of the F. & A. M. society. On May 20, 1846, he was united in marriage with Louisa C. Kauffelt. By this union there has been an issue of four children - Elizabeth A., Franconia, Letitia and Lorena. 
McCLINTICK, Dr. Samuel (I36319)
 
25198 (1) The Hodges-Hodge DNA Project: Patriarchs , citing Judy Osborne :

James [Hodges] b c1725 Lunenberg Co. VA d 1787 Newberry Co. SC m Martha c1745 (b c1730 VA d 1784 Pendelton, SC).

[Based upon Y-DNA tests of descendants of two of his descendants, James Hodges has been grouped in Lineage I in the Hodges-Hodge DNA Project, together with the following persons and their male Hodges descendants:

• Moses Hodges b c1650 Kent, England.
• William Hodges m Elizabeth Smith 4 Dec 1749 Addington, Kent, England.
• Thomas Hodges b c1690 d 1749 Cumberland Co. VA.
• Welcome William Hodges d 1772 Goochland Co. VA.
• Bartholomew Hodges b 1752-1760 VA d aft 1831 Surry Co. NC m Elizabeth Cockerham[?].
• William Hodges b 1764 VA m Elizabeth Neal.
• Abel Hodges b 1769 m Sarah Woods (b c1769 SC)
• Isham Hodges b c1750 VA d bef 10 Nov 1798 Marlboro Co. SC m Mary Gains Marlboro Co. SC.
• Unknown Hodges m Sarah Ingle.
• Thomas Hodges b c1775 NC d c1842; migrated to McMinn Co. TN c1803-32, then to Cherokee Co. AL.
• Drury Hodges b c1778 VA d aft 1829 Scott Co. MO m Diana Griffith 23 Jan 1800 Franklin Co. VA (b c1780 VA d aft 1822 KY).
• Jesse Monroe Hodges b 18 Dec 1788 Providence, Marlboro Co. SC m Catherine Stanley 25 Dec 1812.
• John Hodges b 1770-1780 possibly Georgia; lived in TN in 1840.
• Richard Allen Hodges b 19 Oct 1833 TN m Mary Ann Woodard, Anderson Co. TX.
• John W. Hodges b 1834 Pike Co. MO d 1865 Union Army Prison Camp m Rachel Ann Hodge.
• Joseph Hodges TN m Rosannah Jane Lafferty 13 Dec 1855 Daviess Co. IN (b 25 May 1832 IN).
• John Thomas Hodges b 1835 Dorchester, England d 1921 Guernsey Island, United Kingdom.
• Richard Samuel Hodges b 24 Mar 1854 AR m Mirah (Nettie) Lunett Trimble.

See http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/hodges/pats. All of the persons in Lineage I have a common Hodges ancestor, although the compiler does not know who that ancestor was.]

(2) U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011:

Name: James Hodges
SAR Membership: 79859
Death Date: 19 May 1787
Death Place: Newberry, South Carolina
Spouse: Martha Hodges
Children: Joseph Hodges

(3) The following transcription of the application for SAR membership was made from a copy of the application furnished to the compiler by Dianne Ferrill :

National Number 79859, State Number 359

THE ALABAMA SOCIETY OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP OF JOHN BELTON HODGES, DESCENDANT OF JAMES HODGES
Who served with North Carolina Troops

Application examined and approved August 11, 1955
/s/ Wm. T. Carpenter
Wm. T. Carpenter, State Registrar

Accepted the State Board of Management August 11, 1955
/s/ Wm. T. Carpenter
Wm. T. Carpenter, State Registrar

DATES
Application filed with State Secretary August 11, 1955
Notification of election _____
Fees paid August 11, 1955

* * *

TO THE BOARD OF MANAGERS OF THE ALABAMA SOCIETY OF THE
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

I, JOHN BELTON HODGES, being of the age 67 years, hereby apply for membership in this Society by right of lineal descent in the following line from JAMES HODGES who was born in _____ on the _____ day of _____ 17__, and died in Newberry County, S.C. the 19th day of May 1787, and who assisted in establishing American Independence.

I was born in Route No. 1, Winfield[,] County of Fayette[,] State of Alabama on the 2nd day of April, 1888.

(1) I am the son of William Henry Hodges[,] born 12/25/1847[,] Jefferson Co., Ala., died 7/3/1911[,] Winfield, Ala.[,] and his (_____) wife Selestia Fendora Reeves[,] born 11/28/1855[,] Texas[,] died 10/23/1920[,] Winfield, Ala.[,] Married 1/13/1886[,] Fayette Co., Ala.

(2) grandson of John Carter Hodges[,] born 1/6/1809[,] S.C.[,] died 3/28/1864[,] Fayette Co., Ala.[,] and his (_____) wife Jane Erwin[,] born 1814[,] S.C.[,] died 11/24/1884[,] Fayette Co., Ala.[,] Married 12/5/1833[,] Jefferson Co., Ala.

(3) great-grandson of Joseph Hodges[,] born ca. 1770[,] S.C.[,] died ca. 1844[,] Jefferson Co., Ala.[,] and his (_____) wife Naomi Carter[,] born 1770-1780[,] died 1844-1850[,] Jefferson Co., Ala.[,] Married _____[,] S.C.

(4) great-[great-]grandson of James Hodges[,] born _____[,] will [dated] 5/19/1787[,] Newberry Co., S.C.[,] and his (_____) wife Martha _____, born _____[,] died _____[,] Married _____.

and he, the said JAMES HODGES (No. 4) is the ancestor who assisted in establishing American Independence, while acting in the capacity of Private, 10th North Carolina Continental Line and with the Newbern District N.C. Militia.

* * *

Applicant affirms his adherence to the principles set forth in the Declaration of Independence and his unqualified support of the Constitution of the United States of America, to the end that the inalienable rights of the citizen may be preserved and our ideal representative government perpetuated.

ANCESTOR'S SERVICE

SECTION 1. Any man shall be eligible to membership in in the Society who, being of the age of eighteen years or over, and a citizen of good repute in the community, is the lineal descendant of an ancestor who was at all times unfailing in his loyalty to, and rendered active service in, the cause of American Independence, either as an officer, soldier, seaman, marine, militiaman, or minute man, in the armed forces of the Continental Congress, or of any one of the several Colonies or States, or as a signer of the Declaration of Independence; or as a member of a Committee of Safety or Correspondence; or as a member of any Continental, Provincial, or Colonial Congress or Legislature; or as a recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts of resistance to the authority of Great Britain." - Constitution of National Society S. A. R., Article III, Section 1, adopted June 3, 1907, and as amended.

* * *

Membership (is based upon one original claim; when the applicant derives eligibility by descent from more than one Revolutionary ancestor, and it is desired to file additional claims, separate applications, to be marked "Supplemental Applications," should be made in each case and filed with the original.

State fully such documentary or traditional authority as you found the following record upon, and also the residence of ancestors, with dates of birth and death, if known.

By order of the Board of Trustees, May 3, 1911, the recipient of a certificate granted on this application agrees to surrender his certificate upon failure to pay his membership dues, unless his membership shall cease by reason of death or actual disability, to be determined by the Society of which he is a member.

* * *

My ancestor's services in assisting in the establishment of American Independence during the War of the Revolution were as follows:

My ancestor JAMES HODGES enlisted as a Private in Lytle's Company, 10th N. C. Contrinental Line, on April 12, 1781 for 12 months. p. 133.

North Carolina Army accounts, Vol. X, carries the name of James Hodges, No. 316, as having been paid for services in the Continental Line prior to January 1, 1782. p. 227.

The Comptroller's List of North Carolina shows the name of James Hodges, No. 449, as having been paid in the Hillsborough District in 1785 for service in the Continental Line. p. 390.

The Comptroller's List of North Carolina shows the name of James Hodges, No. 1526, as having been paid in the Newbern District in 1785 for Militia service. p. 411.

Reference: "Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution", by the D.A.R. of North Carolina, 1932, pp. 133, 227, 310, 411.

Ch. Jos., Jesse, Christina, Robt. Shaw, Hailey Shaw, Rebecca Shaw & Patty Shaw.

Genealogy

(1) Hodges Family Bible, Tombstones, Reeve Family Bible B., D., M.

(2) Hodges Family Bible, Tombstones, 1850 Census Jefferson Co., Ala. Jefferson County Marriage Record, Vol. 1, page 417.

(3) 1830 and 1840 Census Records of Jefferson Co. Ala. Will "Jefferson County Orphans Court, South Carolina Book" 1841-1844, page 584.

(4) Will of James Hodges of Newberry County, South Carolina 19th May 1787 - Proved June 5th, 1787. Photostat Copies Vol. 1, Date 1776-1814, A, page 3.

Full maiden name of applicant's wife[:] Mittie Lou Lee[,] born 12/16/1888[,] married 5/10/1914

* * *

NAMES OF CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN OF APPLICANT
(Added to blank by order of Trustees. July, 1915)

Name: Sara Hodges Chamberlain
Date of Birth: 10/23/1916
Residence: Piper City, Illinois
[She m. Henry H. Chamberlain 7/26/1943 - They had Henry Hodges Chamberlain, b. 3/30/1945, resides at Piper City, Illinois.]

Name: Jean Hodges Bentley
Date of Birth: 4/29/1919
Residence: 1308 Bond Street, Kinston, N.C.
[She m. Clarence Hagan Bentley 5/19/1944 - They had Joseph Hagan Bentley, b. 9/24/1946, resides Kinston, N.C.; Jean Hodges Bentley, b. 10/30/1948, resides Kinston, N.C.; John Hodges Bentley, 3/31/1950, Kinston, N.C.]

Name: Virginia Anne Hodges
Date of Birth: 6/13/1929
Residence: Hamilton, Alabama

* * *

Statement of applicant of services if any, in the Military or Naval forces of the United States of America: _____.

* * *

The following are references to the authorities for the record of my ancestor's service and for the genealogical data contained in this application: Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, pp. 133, 227, 390, 4aa.

* * *

Nominated and recommended by the undersigned members of the Society:

/s/ Wm. T. Carpenter
/s/ John Whitfield Moore [?]

Signature of applicant (Name in full)

/s/ John Belton Hodges
John Belton Hodges
Marion County Banking Company
Hamilton, Alabama
Occupation: Banker

* * *

The following form of acknowledgement is required

STATE OF Alabama )
COUNTY OF Marion ) ss:

August 9, 1955

Personally appeared Mr. John Belton Hodges

(4) History of Echols Family by Milner Echols, 1850 :

Old Abraham [Echols] had one daughter who married James Hodges a very worthy man, his family moved to Tennessee. He had one son named Jessee and he [Jessee?] had a son named James who was a commanding officer in Tennessee and got drowned in Cumberland River near Cairo.

(5) Hodges, James of Newberry County, Will Typescript (MSS Will: Estate Record Book A, Page 2) (2 Frames):

WILL OF JAMES HODGES

I James Hodges of the State of South Carolina and Newberry County being in a low state of health - But in a sound and perfect Memory Do will and Bequeath to my son Joseph Hodges one feather Bed and furniture.

I will and Bequeath to my well Beloved Wife Martha Hodges one feather bed as also one red Cow and her increase.

I will and Bequeath to my son Joseph one Pide cow and her increase.

I will that my Stock of Hoges Be Aqually Davided Between my son Joseph Hodges and my wife Martha.

I will that my son Joseph Hodges have all my iron tools of Every kind.

I will one Cotton wheel and Cards Likewise one small Pot now in Hailey Shaws Pofsesfion to my wife Martha Hodges.

I will and Bequeath to my sone Joseph Hodges one Dutch oven also one Large black walnut Chest as also one flax Wheel.

I will to my Daughter Christiana Two Pewter Basons and one Pewter plate.

I will and bequeath to my son Joseph Hodges one Pewter Dish one Bason and Two Plates.

I will to my son Joseph Hodges one Roan Mare About fourteen hands high with a Large Star in her forehead and one White foot not Branded.

I will and bequeath to my Daughter Rebeckah Shaw one small bay horse with with [sic] a Star in his forehead about Thirteen hands high as also my saddl and bridle & big Pot.

I will to my son Joseph one butter pot flat iron and Looking glafs.

I will to my Wife Martha Hodges Jugs one Large and one Small.

I will that my table Knives be Equally Devided Between My son Joseph Hodges and my wife Martha Hodges.

I will to my son Joseph Hodges one Seting Chair Likewise one to my wife Martha Hodges.

I will to my son Joseph Hodges one flax Hackel Course and one fine.

I will to my son Hailey Shaw one Great Coat.

I will to my daughter Patte Shaw one frying pan likewise one Six hundred Stay.

I will to my Son Joseph Hodges one mans Saddle.

I will to my wife Martha Hodges all my water and Milking Vefsels as also my hat to my Son Robert Shaw as also three pounds in William Carrs to my son Joseph Hodges as also one bond of Twenty pounds on John Smith.

I will that one Rifle be sold to pay debts.

I will that two pounds nine Shillings in the hands of Amos Hodges be collected ten shellings to my son, Jefse Hodges also ten Shillings to Tabby ten Shillings to Sarah glafs ten Shillings to my Daughter Rebeckah Shaw nine shillings to patty Shaw.

I will to my son Joseph Hodges one Large Bible one hymn Book one pair of Stippiards and one half Bushell.

I will that Rebeckah Shaw have my pen knife also one candle Stick and house shears to my son Joseph Hodges forever.

Signed Sealed and Delivered as my last will and testament in presence of

Ross Golding
George x Ellott
Haley x Shaw
Jofeph Hodges

19th May 1787
James Hodges

To my son Joseph Hodges and also one white sow and six shouts and one Grind stone halay share Joseph Hodges to be my holy excekator.

At a court held for Newberry County June the 5 1787 and of the Twelfth Year of American Independence.

Recorded in Will Book (A) page 2
(Proven Jun 5th 1787)
T. Malone CLK. C.

(6) In August 1798, William CARR filed a chancery case in the County Court of Halifax County, VA against the heirs of James HODGES, deceased, namely, William GLASS and Sarah (HODGES) GLASS, husband and wife; Robert SHAW and Patsey (HODGES) SHAW, husband and wife; Hailey SHAW and Rebecca (HODGES) SHAW, husband and wife; Jesse HODGES; Joseph HODGES, Chainey HODGES; and James HODGES. [The compiler believes that Chainey HODGES was the same person as Christina HODGES.] In May 1800, the court entered a default judgment in that case, which judgment reads as follows:

The defendant Jesse having been duly served with the subpoena in this cause and it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court, that the former Order of the said Court requiring the defendants William Glass and Sarah his wife, Robert Shaw and Patsey his wife, Hailey Shaw and Rebecca his wife, Joseph Hodges, Chainey Hodges, and James Hodges to appear and answer the bill of the plaintiff hath been duly published, and the defendants failing to appear and answer the same Therefore on the motion of the said plaintiff by his counsel, It is decreed and Ordered that the defendants do convey to the plaintiff by deed duly executed the fee simple estate in the lands and premises in the bill mentioned agreeable to the prayer thereof - and that the plaintiff recover his costs by him in this behalf expended.

* * *

Based on this case, it appears that the children of James HODGES who survived him were:

• Sarah (HODGES) GLASS
• Patsey (HODGES) SHAW
• Rebecca (HODGES) SHAW
• Jesse HODGES
• Joseph HODGES
• Christina HODGES
• James HODGES

These children are not listed in age order, and James HODGES may have had other children who predeceased him. 
HODGES, James (I27006)
 
25199 (1) The name of the mother of Lafayette Belle "Fate" HEINRICH is unknown to the compiler. (HEINRICH), --- (I41898)
 
25200 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I41965)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 ... 527» Next»