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25151 (1) Thoburn, Joseph B. and Wright, Muriel H., Oklahoma, a History of the State and its People, Vol. 4, New York, NY: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Inc., 1929, p. 569:

R. OTIS McCLINTOCK - Having been engaged at different periods of his life in many lines of business activity, including the oil industry and banking, R. Otis McClintock is now president of the First National Bank and Trust Company, of Tulsa, Oklahoma. He has shown himself always eager to do whatever has been in his power to improve the prosperity and well-being of the citizens of this place, and there is no matter of public, civic, or social importance in which he is not deeply interested.

Mr. McClintock was born at Cridersville, Ohio, on February 19, 1881, son of Frank G. and Gertrude McClintock. His father was an oil producer by occupation. R. Otis McClintock, of whom this is a record, received his early training in the public schools, and, when his family took up their home in Tulsa. Oklahoma, he studied in the high school in this city, from which he was graduated in the class of 1909. In that year, on June 10, he became engaged in field work with the Gypsy Oil Company, of Tulsa, with which he remained associated until November 1, 1913. On that date he went into the general oil business on his own account, and continued in this work until September 1, 1916. Then he became vice-president of the Gypsy Oil Company and the Gulf Pipe Line Company of Oklahoma, both of Tulsa, and remained with them until April 30, 1925. From then until December 10, 1927, he was vice-president of the Philmack Company, in which he also held a directorship; while on December 10, 1927, he became a vice-president and a director of the Independent Oil and Gas Company, of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Since October 1, 1928, Mr. McClintock has been in his present position as president of the First National Bank and Trust Company of Tulsa, in which he has held a directorship since 1918, and in whose affairs he has been constantly active. In his work as banker, as in all his previous activities, Mr. McClintock has shown the same excellent qualities of leadership and business talents that have gone into every enterprise with which he has been associated. A genial personality, combined with a constant consideration of other people and their points of view, have gone far toward making him a business and industrial leader.

Along with his business and banking work, Mr. McClintock has been active in the socal and organizational activities of Tulsa and his State. In his political views he is identified prominently with the Republican party. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, in which order he is affiliated with Delta Lodge, No. 425, of Tulsa; the Indian Consistory of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, of MacAlester, in which he holds the thirty-second degree; and the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Tulsa. He also belongs to the Tulsa Club and the Tulsa Country Club. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, North, and his wife and son are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church.

R. Otis McClintock married, on November 4, 1913, Gladys Belle Stebbins, daughter of Grant C. and Kate Stebbins. By this marriage there has been one son, Mac McClintock, born on September 6, 1914.

(2) U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005:

Name: R Olis McClintock [R Otis McClintock]
City: Tulsa
County: Tulsa
State: Oklahoma
Birthplace: Ohio
Birth Date: 19 Feb 1891
Race: Caucasian (White)
Age: 26
Occupation: Oil producer
Nearest Relative: Wife and child
Height/Build: Medium/Medium
Color of Eyes/Hair: Blue/Light Brown
Signature: R. Otis McClintock

(3) A household headed by R. Otis McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1920 census of Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK, next to a household headed by his father, Frank G. McCLINTOCK.

R. Otis is listed in the 1920 census as an oil producer who was then 28 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1892. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in OH.

Listed with R. Otis is his wife, Gladys B., who was then 26 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, she was born in about 1894. According to the 1920 census, she was born in IL, and both of her parents were born in IL.

Also listed with R. Otis is his son, Frank G., who was then 5-4/12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1920 census, he was born in about 1914. According to the 1920 census, he was born in OK, his father was born in OH, and his mother was born in IL. [His middle initial is listed as S. in the index to the 1920 census.]

Also listed with R. Otis is an apparently unrelated black maid.

(4) A household headed by Otis R. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1930 census of Tulsa, Tulsa County, OK.

Otis R. is listed in the 1930 census as a bank president who was then 39 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1891. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OH, and both of his parents were born in OH. According to the 1930 census, he was 22 years of age at his first marriage.

Listed with Otis R. is his wife, Gladys, who was then 37 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1930 census, she was born in IL, her father was born in IL, and her mother was born in KS. According to the 1930 census, she was 20 years of age at her first marriage.

Also listed with Otis R. is his son, Mac, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1930 census, he was born in about 1915. According to the 1930 census, he was born in OK, his father was born in OH, and his mother was born in IL.

Also listed with Otis R. is an apparently unrelated black cook.

(5) A household headed by R. O. McCLINTOCK is listed in the 1940 census of Lynn Lane Township, Tulsa County, OK.

R. O. is listed in the 1940 census as a bank president who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, he was born in about 1891. According to the 1940 census, he was born in OH. According to the 1940 census, his residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

Listed with R. O. is his wife, Gladys, who was then 47 years of age; therefore, according to the 1940 census, she was born in about 1893. According to the 1940 census, she was born in IL. According to the 1940 census, her residence as of April 1, 1935 was the same as it was at the time of the 1940 census.

Also listed with R. O. are an apparently unrelated black chauffer and an apparently unrelated black maid.

(6) Social Security Death Index:

Name: R. McClintock
SSN: 443-14-2257
Last Residence: 74102 Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
Born: 19 Feb 1891
Died: Oct 1973
State (Year) SSN issued: Oklahoma (Before 1951)

(7) www.findagrave.com:

Rupert Otis McClintock
Birth: Feb. 19, 1891, Ohio, USA
Death: Oct. 11, 1973, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA

Family links: Parents: Frank Gartley McClintock (1863 - 1953), Gertrude Lacy Redinbaugh McClintock (1867 - 1921); Spouse: Gladys Bell Stebbins McClintock (1892 - 1965); Children: Frank Grant McClintock (1914 - 1985)

Burial: Rose Hill Memorial Park, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA
Plot: Abbey 3rd L-1500 Row C

Created by: Chad Kendell
Record added: May 27, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 70454037

(8) Susan Everly-Douze, The Tulsa World, April 23, 1989:

The house that R. Otis McClintock built is a bricks and mortar testimonial to Tulsa's black gold heyday, the era that saw a boom town mature to a financially savvy city that earned its "Oil Capital" moniker not on drilling rig floors but in banks and board rooms.

McClintock personified that transition. He was 15 in 1907 when his family was enticed to Tulsa by tales of the Glenn Pool's gushers. Hired on as a teen-age roustabout, he quickly grasped the business and became hugely successful. His business partners included Waite Phillips.

It was oil naturally that bankrolled the house that McClintock built in 1931 just outside the city limits at 41st Street and Lewis Avenue.

But the one-time roustabout who moved his family into the impressive new home wasn't a full-time oilman anymore. He was a banker, although an unwilling one.

Because of his oil patch savvy, McClintock was recruited in 1928 as president of First National Bank & Trust Co., the city's oldest financial institution. He reluctantly accepted but for only one year, he insisted, until a replacement could be found.

McClintock didn't know it then, but in fact, his oil patch days already were numbered. He would retire from the bank many decades later after gaining a national repution for his oil department.

Tulsa's black gold boom had oil barons and bankers alike studding downtown with skyscrapers. Competing in grandness were the mansions they built for their families. For inspiration, they routinely looked to the villas, manors and chateaus of Europe. McClintock was no exception.

Waite Phillips opted for an Italian Renaissance-style villa completed in 1928. So did fellow oilman-philanthropist and Oklahoma Gov. E.W. Marland who built his "mansion on the prairie" in Ponca City.

McClintock's fancy was a French countryside estate. He built that dream house in 1931 despite the Depression which brought soup lines and "We Want Work" parades to Tulsa streets.

In New York bankers were jumping out of windows. Financial times became tough in Tulsa too, but in the new McClintock residence, the mood was said to reflect the comraderie of high-stakes oilman rather than fretting, mutton-chopped bankers. In fact, the very walls of the house literally thumbed their noses at the financial bad times. Long-time friends recall that McClintock one day invited his cronies to bring over their stocks and bonds rendered worthless by the stock market crash and plaster them to a wall.

Unfortunately for McClintock's decor, some of the paper eventually regained value. His friends returned to rip down the makeshift decorations, leaving the new homeowner grousing about his ruined wall.

In a town of powerful men, McClintock was one of the most powerful. He was called "Mr. First." Much crucial business entertaining, particularly the luring of American Airlines from the East Coast to Tulsa, centered at his home. Be it champagne receptions in the elegant French drawing room or chili suppers in the club room, invitations to the McClintocks were highly sought after.

That was a half century ago. This spring Tulsans don't need a special invitation to stroll through the same drawing room or head downstairs to the family club room. Steven and Tamara Smith, the third family to live in the 58-year-old home, are throwing open its doors. The occasion is the selection of the vintage home as this year's Designer Showcase, benefiting the Tulsa Philharmonic Orchestra. Some 37 interior designers and decorators have worked their craft. "It's an outstanding house, outstanding in its elegance and simplicity," says Smith, who describes the redo as "restoration and enhancement." No wall structure was altered except in the quarters.

"We feel like we're helping to preserve Tulsa history by doing this," says Smith, head of Steeltek, Inc. on the city's west side.

The family currently lives in Mannford, but Smith grew up two blocks from his new home. "I've always been fascinated by it," he says. "When we discovered it was empty, we decided to buy."

As a nod to the home's French heritage, the family has rechristened the residence Chateau Smith.

The residence is a singular architectural coup. It is Tulsa's only residence designed jointly by two of the city's premier architects, the late John Duncan Forsyth and Donald McCormick. To old-timers who still can pick out the countless Forsyth and McCormick houses in Tulsa's older nieghborhoods, they're simply "Jack and Mack," known best for their joint design of Southern Hills Country Club, again at the urging of McClintock. Forsyth, the son of a Scottish dry goods merchant, ran off from Edinburgh to Paris to study at the Sorbonne. There, he met John Russell Poe, famed for his design of large country estates.

Oklahoma's legendary oilman E.W. Marland wanted a Poe-designed homestead, but Poe couldn't see himself venturing that far into the hinterlands, whatever the project or price. Instead, he recommended his young associate, Forsyth.

Unlike Marland, however, McClintock wasn't satisfied with one architect, however highly touted.

The banker also desired the design talents of McCormick, a young Philadelphia architect who came to Tulsa as supervising architect of the First Methodist Church.

McCormick, now 90, who counts 30 churches among his portfolio of work, still remembers McClintock's pitch:

"Otis said, 'I know you two may not want to work together, but I want you both. I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings.' As usual, Otis got his way."

The temperments of Mack and Jack may not always have jived, but their combined talents produced a show stopper of a home. According to Tulsa architect John Brooks Walton, who as a young architect worked for Forsyth in the '50s, the McClintock home contained design features that Forsyth had originally conceived for the Marland mansion.

"Forsyth told me that he really wanted to build a country French style home for Marland," Walton said. "But Marland had been to Italy, had seen houses he really liked, and wouldn't listen. Forsyth put ideas he couldn't use in Ponca City into the McClintock house."

Typical of the French country style, the McCormick house sported a steeply pitched roof with heavy masonry construction. Inside the ceilings were high and the rooms were gracious. The interior had multiple split levels with an elegant eliptical staircase as the interior focal point. Everything for the home, from the chandeliers to the mouldings, was custom-made. Each of the bedrooms was actually a suite of rooms including a sleeping porch-sitting area, a dressing room and bath. In the sleeping porch of the master bedroom, the windows when open would disappear entirely down into the sills. The deco-styled fireplace in the son's bedroom was designed to contain a radio.

Overall the style of the home was French country, but Forsyth could be a chameleon of style and it was obvious here in the McClintock home.

In the library, for example, there was a nod to English style with Georgian keystone arches in the windows and shelves. Most decidedly English was the club room, reminiscent of a pub with an inglenook fireplace masssive enough to walk into.

Fifty years have gone by, but Patricia Schmidlapp, now of Palm Beach and Paris, has fond memories of the club room. She grew up in Tulsa, watched the construction of the McClintock home. And it became her home for 10 years. For her the son's suite became the marital suite. 
McCLINTOCK, Rupert Otis (I36238)
 
25152 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

Anna [BALLARD], was living 30 June 1779, having previously married c. 1747 Gabriel Maupin, who was born in 1720 in Williamsburg; perhaps it was he who in 1776 was appointed Keeper of the Magazine near Williamsburg; died in 1794 in Albemarle county, Virginia, and was a son of Daniel Maupin (who was born 1700 in England, lived in Green county, Kentucky, and died in 1788) and Margaret Via (1700-1789). They had thirteen children. 
BALLARD, Anna (I37434)
 
25153 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

BLAND [BALLARD], married Frances Shiflett. Born c. 1735, on 14 July 1797, was living in Albemarle county; lived all his life in Albemarle and died there in 1809. He married (1) _____, and (2) Frances Shiflett, who was living 5 June 1797, the daughter of John Shiflett and Joice Powell. 
BALLARD, Bland (I37432)
 
25154 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

Frances, born in 1745; her child was: Rachel, born c. 1764, died 15 August 1829 in Pendleton county, Kentucky; married before 30 June 1779 Gabriel Mullins who was born c. 1751, served in Continental Army, removed c. 1790 to Madison county, Kentucky (later Pendleton county, Kentucky), died 18 May 1841, and was son of Matthew Mullins and Mary Maupin of Goochland county, Virginia. Frances married (2) after 8 March 1781 Waddy Thompson Slaughter, who was living 1823 in New York, New York, where he was postmaster and owned a tanyard, and was son of John Slaughter (died 1797) and Ann Thompson, who married (2) Philip Grafton. 
BALLARD, Frances (I37436)
 
25155 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

John [BALLARD], married Mourning _____. He pre-deceased his wife and father, for only she is named in his father's will dated 30 June 1779. Their children were 1. Samuel; 2. John; possibly 3. Thomas, for an 1800 a British Mercantile Claim reported the whereabouts of a Thomas Ballard, son of John, then resident in North Carolina; the supplier of the information appears to be "Thomas Ballard of Albemarle, an uncle of Thomas Ballard, son of John." (the likely informant being Thomas Horace Ballard) 
BALLARD, John (I37431)
 
25156 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

On 20 July 1738, "Thomas Ballard of Caroline Co." patented 320 acres between Piney Mountain and Brown's Cove in Hanover county, "on South side of Piney Mountain," where he was living in Fredericksville Parish as late as 28 April 1761. On 22 October 1750 he purchased 400 acres in Fredericksville Parish from William Ballard, who was likely his brother; possibly his father. He was active in his church, for the Parish Vestry Book shows him on several occasions processioning land, which was intended to keep the peace by reminding landowners of their property boundaries; the first appears 23 September 1751 and again on 23 July 1755.

On 26 March 1753, he witnessed a deed between William Coursey, Jr and his wife Mary to Thomas Harding for 100 acres in Fredericksville Parish, Louisa county. On 24 September 1754, he acquired 100 acres in Fredericksville Parish from John Pulliam, described as on the "N. Side of the South River . . . to Price's corner . . . sd. John Pulliam's line . . . part of a tract whereon sd. Pulliam now dwelleth."

Joined by his wife Susanah, Thomas Ballard sold his original patent on 25 March 1758 to Richard Allen of Louisa county. The land acquired from John Pulliam in 1754 was sold on 28 April 1761 to Daniel Ross of Fredericksville Parish, Louisa county. He was still present in Louisa on 11 January 1763 when he witnessed a deed between John Wheeler and Alexander Galesby of Louisa county.

Thomas Ballard's name appears in a deed dated 8 June 1765 between Abraham Allen and his son Micajah Allen that was recorded in Albemarle county. In a deed dated 10 October 1773, Thomas Ballard is described as "of Albemarle Co.", when he purchased a small parcel of 33 acres in Louisa county from William Pettit & Susanna, his wife. He paid £6,000 for 350 acres in Albemarle on 9 November 1780 by deed from David Mills.

He must have sensed the end of life approaching, for he began providing personal property for his children. On 5 January 1780 he conveyed two negro slaves to his daughter Susanna Pettet. On 8 March 1781, he conveyed two slaves each to his children Thomas, Bland, and Anna, and three to his daughter Frances.

Thomas Ballard was dead by 9 May 1782, the date his will was recorded in Albemarle. Married (1) Susannah Hesson, who was living 25 March 1758, but probably deceased by 28 April 1761. He married (2) Mary Powers, who died before 30 June 1779, for he fails to name her in his will bearing that date. According to an uncorroborated online record, his grave is near Free Union in Albemarle County. According to this record, Thomas Ballard was born in 1716 and died 30 June 1780. He married (1) Susannah Hesson, who according to the same source was born in 1716, and died in 1768. He married (2) Mary Powers, who probably died before 30 June 1779, for he fails to name her in his will bearing that date.

The will of Thomas Ballard, dated 30 June 1779 is recorded in Albemarle County, Virginia.

* * *

In the name of God Amen I Thomas Ballard of Albemarle Co. do here make my Last will and Testament hereby Revoking all former wills. . . . I Resign my Soul to God in all humble hopes of future happiness. . . Jesus Christ and Lord.

Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary five pounds sterling,

Item I give and Devide to my sons Thomas Ballard & Bland Ballard and their heirs for ever all this my land they suffering my daughter-in-law, Mourning Ballard to live on, use and occupy that part of it whereon she now lives during her natural Life and I will and . . . the land to be equally divided between them so that Bland enjoy that part whereon he now lives.

Item I give and bequeath the use of a negro Delphia unto my daughter Frances Ballard, and after her decease I give and bequeath the negro Delphia unto her heirs Lawfully Begotten, but if she die without Heirs then and in that case I give the said girl unto the natural Daughter of my Daughter Frances names Rachel now wife of Gabriel Mullins.

Item I give unto my Daughter Susanna Pettit during her life all my land in Louisa County, and after her death I give and devise the said land unto her, the said Susanna Pettit's eldest son then surviving and his heirs for ever.

Item I give and bequeath and Devise all the Rest Residue and remainder of my estate to be Equally divided among my five children, Thomas, Bland, Anna Maupin, Frances Ballard, and Susanna Pettit to them or to their Representatives Respectively and I appoint my sons Thomas & Bland Executors.

This is my Last will and Testament Signed with my hand and Sealed with my Seal dated this thirtieth day of June One Thousand Seven hundred and Seventy Nine. Witnesses - Wm. Michie, Zachariah Mills, Joseph Mills.

The children of Thomas Ballard and Susannah Hesson were:

[i] John, married Mourning _____. He pre-deceased his wife and father, for only she is named in his father's will dated 30 June 1779. Their children were 1. Samuel; 2. John; possibly 3. Thomas, for an 1800 a British Mercantile Claim reported the whereabouts of a Thomas Ballard, son of John, then resident in North Carolina; the supplier of the information appears to be "Thomas Ballard of Albemarle, an uncle of Thomas Ballard, son of John." (the likely informant being Thomas Horace Ballard)

[ii] BLAND, married Frances Shiflett. Born c. 1735, on 14 July 1797, was living in Albemarle county; lived all his life in Albemarle and died there in 1809. He married (1) _____, and (2) Frances Shiflett, who was living 5 June 1797, the daughter of John Shiflett and Joice Powell.

[iii] THOMAS HORACE, married Mary Elizabeth Ballard.

[iv] Anna, was living 30 June 1779, having previously married c. 1747 Gabriel Maupin, who was born in 1720 in Williamsburg; perhaps it was he who in 1776 was appointed Keeper of the Magazine near Williamsburg; died in 1794 in Albemarle county, Virginia, and was a son of Daniel Maupin (who was born 1700 in England, lived in Green county, Kentucky, and died in 1788) and Margaret Via (1700-1789). They had thirteen children.

[v] Susanna, was living 10 October 1773 in Trinity Parish, Louisa county; was living 30 June 1779; married William Pettit of Louisa county, who was born c. 1736, a schoolmaster and official surveyor, who died in 1805 (the son of William Pettit (born c. 1697 in Ireland, emigrated c. 1720 to America, buried in Louisa county) and Ann Baker of Spotsylvania and Louisa counties). They had eight children.

[vi] Frances, born in 1745; her child was: Rachel, born c. 1764, died 15 August 1829 in Pendleton county, Kentucky; married before 30 June 1779 Gabriel Mullins who was born c. 1751, served in Continental Army, removed c. 1790 to Madison county, Kentucky (later Pendleton county, Kentucky), died 18 May 1841, and was son of Matthew Mullins and Mary Maupin of Goochland county, Virginia. Frances married (2) after 8 March 1781 Waddy Thompson Slaughter, who was living 1823 in New York, New York, where he was postmaster and owned a tanyard, and was son of John Slaughter (died 1797) and Ann Thompson, who married (2) Philip Grafton.

The child of Thomas Ballard and Mary Powers was:

[vii] Mary.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Thomas Ballard
Birth: 1716, York County, Virginia, USA
Death: 1781, Albemarle County, Virginia, USA

Family links: Parents: William Ballard (1684 - 1754), Philadelphia Ludwell Lee Ballard (1682 - ____); Spouse: Susannah Hesson Ballard (1716 - 1768); Children: Thomas Horace Ballard (1732 - 1804), Mary Ballard Wills (1765 - 1837); Siblings: Philip Ballard (1704 - 1778), William Ballard (1715 - 1794), Thomas Ballard (1716 - 1781)

Burial: Unknown

Created by: Sue Macduff
Record added: Dec 21, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 63202980 
BALLARD, Thomas (I37428)
 
25157 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

Susanna [BALLARD], was living 10 October 1773 in Trinity Parish, Louisa county; was living 30 June 1779; married William Pettit of Louisa county, who was born c. 1736, a schoolmaster and official surveyor, who died in 1805 (the son of William Pettit (born c. 1697 in Ireland, emigrated c. 1720 to America, buried in Louisa county) and Ann Baker of Spotsylvania and Louisa counties). They had eight children. 
BALLARD, Susanna (I37435)
 
25158 (1) Thomas Ballard of Albemarle County, Virginia (c. 1716-c. 1780) :

THOMAS HORACE [BALLARD], married Mary Elizabeth Ballard.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Thomas Horace Ballard
Birth: 1732, Albemarle County, Virginia, USA
Death: Dec. 3, 1804, Albemarle County, Virginia, USA

Thomas Horace Ballard was born about 1732 in York County, Virginia. In 1790, he was living in Albemarle County, Virginia.

He signed his Will on December 14, 1802 in Albemarle County, Virginia.

Family links: Parents: Thomas Ballard (1716 - 1781), Susannah Hesson Ballard (1716 - 1768); Spouse: Mourning Ballard (1735 - ____); Children: John Ballard (1759 - 1829), Lucy Jane Ballard Harvey (1761 - 1851); Sibling: Thomas Horace Ballard (1732 - 1804), Mary Ballard Wills (1765 - 1837)

Burial: Unknown

Created by: Sue Macduff
Record added: Dec 21, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 63202635 
BALLARD, Thomas Horace (I37433)
 
25159 (1) Thomas Ballard of James City County, Virginia (1630-1690) :

James Branch Cabell provides the definitive portrait of Colonel Thomas Ballard in the masterful genealogy of his family, The Majors and Their Marriages (Richmond: W.C. Hill Printing Co., 1915), which is quoted here in full, and supplemented with references and notes clarifying or correcting Cabell's work, and revealing more recent scholarship.

Thomas Ballard of James City county, born in 1630, was in all likelihood a son of the Henry Ballard who is named as a headright in Captain Christopher Calthropp's land-patent of 1,000 acres in Charles River county, dated 6 May 1636, and who himself patented fifty acres in Warwick county, 31 October 1642. There are divers other circumstances, here irrelevant, which indicate that Thomas Ballard had interests in Warwick, and was presumably born there.

It is certain, at all events, that he was in 1652 clerk of York county, and retained this office for eleven years afterward. Ballard was thus already upon the road to preferment. To quote once more from Mr Bruce's Institutional History of Virginia: There are numerous indications that the clerks of the county courts were frequently men belonging to families of conspicuous influence. . . . As it was permissible to combine the office with other positions perhaps more lucrative, it was not considered even by men of good estates and of great political importance to be unworthy of their acceptance. It shows how far this combination of other offices with a clerkship was carried during the years preceding the Insurrection of 1676 that one man was allowed to perform, in addition to its duties, the duties of county surveyor, escheat master, and public notary, all places of decided profit. The office of clerk by itself must have been the source of a large income to the incumbents." At this time they were authorized to practice as attorneys in their respective courts - "and independently of these services, the fees which they were permitted by Act of Assembly to charge for their ordinary duties as clerks assured them an ample return for their labor." . . .

On 16 July 1655 Thomas Ballard patented 1,000 acres in "Gloucester county, now called Kent", his tract lying east and being due for the importation of twenty persons. He seems, however, never to have seated this land; and indeed, a marginal note is appended to the land grant, "This Pattent is relenqueshed for ye right to make good a patent of 1,300 Acres fo the said Ballard's Dated ye 6th: October 1658." He a little later, on 15 October 1657, patented 600 acres "on South Peanketanke", assigned to Ballard by Abraham Moon (who had patented the land on 1 November 1634), but this tract Ballard sold shortly afterward to Major David Cant. He then patented, 6 October 1658, some 1,300 acres "on Whorecock swamp" in New Kent county, due for the importation of twenty-six persons, and 290 acres in York, 13 January 1661; but these lands Ballard also sold, and, apparently in 1663, removed to James City county, where for the remainder of his life he made his home.

While a resident of York Ballard had married Anna [_____]. . . . There is . . . recorded in York a deed from Thomas Ballard and Anna Ballard, his wife, conveying to Matthew Hubard the land Ballard patented in 1661; which deed Anna Ballard signed on 28 March 1662, her witnesses being John Hillier and Jane Hillier.

Thomas Ballard, then, removed to James City county c. 1663, and was chosen to represent that county in the Virginia House of Burgesses for the session beginning 5 June 1666 and prorogued to 23 October 1666. He seems from the outset to have played no inconspicuous part in the Assembly. He was appointed, 31 October 1666, one of the "Committee to regulate the price of Ordinary Keepers", for in those days the rates charted by innkeepers was not a matter beyond the deliberation of the lower house. On 2 November Ballard was named one of the committee "to attend the Governor about a treaty with Maryland and the Incident Instructions", and, 6 November 1666, to "attend the Honourable Governor for drawing the Instruments for Wm Drum (Drummond), Governor of Carolina, and the Instructions for the Commissioners for Maryland, and to treat also with his Honour concerning his Satisfaction for the Silk presented to this Country by his Sacred Majesty." This marks almost the last gasp of the long-continued effort to make silk in Virginia profitably. On the same date Ballard was also one of the committee to attend the Governor "to request his Honour to consider some Hon'ble persons that might be fit and would please to accept the Managing the Affairs of the Country in England."

. . . . Ballard seems to have survived only one term in the House of Burgesses, . . . but he remained a member of the Governor's Council for thirteen years. . . .

As a member of the Council, Ballard now made his home at Middle Plantation, afterward Williamsburg, where he was living certainly as early as 1668; and where on 28 January 1674-5 he purchased from Thomas Ludwell a considerable tract of land, including, as has been said, all the ground whereon stands the present College of William and Mary. Ballard's home seems to have been just east of the College, at the western end of Francis Street.

In York, 24 April 1673, Thomas Ballard was appointed guardian of Anne Broomfield, the daughter of Mrs Mary Marsh, deceased; and it is possible that this Mary Marsh was his sister. She had married, first, Thomas Broomfield, and second, Joseph Croshaw (being his fifth wife), and, third, Clement Marsh. . . .

He . . . retired from public life, rather irrationally converted into a popular hero, at what was then considered the ripe age of fifty-six; and of the remaining two years of his life appears no record. Colonel Thomas Ballard was buried in James City county, where he had long been a vestryman of Bruton parish, 24 March 1689 [probably 1689/90]. . . .

Ballard's first wife, Anna . . . , had died some years before him, on 26 September 1678. He had evidently remarried, as in York was recorded 24 July 1691, "an order ag't Mr Thomas Barbar, High Sheriff, is granted Mr Tho: Ballard, Assigne Alice Ballard, Ex'c'r'x of Coll: Tho: Ballard, Assigne Henry Waring, being for ye non-appearance of Jno Easton." This suit was dismissed 24 September 1691, the case being dropped. The entry, in connection with the hereinafter mentioned suit brought by William Ballard at the last named court, would indicate that Colonel Ballard married, second, Alice _____, who survived him and acted as his executrix. By this second marriage there were no children.

Colonel Thomas Ballard and his first wife, Anna _____, had issue:

[i] John, believed by Cabell to have settled in Nansemond county, Virginia, where on 2 June 1673 he patented 300 acres. Named 1 May 1668 in the will of Robert Baldrey, and died . . . after 1694.

[iii] THOMAS, born c. 1655 in York county; married Katherine Hubard, daughter of John Hubard and Katherine Hubard.

[iv] Lydia, married Thomas Harwood. He survived her, and married, second, Elizabeth Read, the daughter of Thomas Read, who died in 1700, without issue from either marriage.

[v] Elizabeth, born 31 December 1665, died 25 October 1705; married 31 December 1704 to _____ Ladd.

[vi] Martha, married John Collier; died without issue.

[vii] WILLIAM, married Elizabeth _______.

[viii] FRANCIS, married Mary Servant.

Thomas Ballard married (2) after 26 September 1678 Alice _____, who was living 24 July 1691, and had no issue.

(2) Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Vol. I [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, pp. 309, 380-381, 496:

MR. THOMAS BALLARD, 1,000 acs. Glouster Co., now called New Kent Co., on S. E. side of Mettopony Riv & along the head of Mr. William Wyatt's land. 16 July 1655. Trans. of 20 pers: James Cook, Robert Fisher, Thomas Crump, Wm. Johnson, Wm. Cuningham, Elizabeth Masterson, Grace Farloe, Thomas Pritchard, Grace Fisher, Ann Simpson, James Glover, Thomas Pratt, Toby. Forester, Richard Proby, Cuthbert Jackson, James Cooper, William Smith, Fra. Crosyer, James Smith, Sarah Talbott. Page 350.

* * *

THOMAS BALLARD, 600 acs. upon the head of Pyanketanke Riv. & W.N.W. upon land of Capt. Stephen Gill, dec'd. 15 Oct 1657, p. 126, (186). Granted unto Abraham Moone 1 Nov. 1654, & by him assigned unto sd. Ballard. Renewed 2 Apr. 1662 in name of Major David Cant, assignee of sd. Ballard.

* * *

MR. THOMAS BALLARD, 1300 acs. New Kent Co., 6 Oct. 1658, p. 232, (330). Upon N. side of Mattapany Riv. & branches of Whorecock Swamp. Trans. of 26 pers: Wm. Reynolls, Hannah Reynolds, Abygoll Reynolls, Jno. Reynolls, James Glover, Cuthbert Jackson, James Smith, Hannah Reynolls, Deborah Reynolls, James Cooke, Robt. Fisher, Tho. Pratt, James Cooper, Sarah Talbott, Tho. Crumpe, Wm. Jnoson (Johnson), Wm. Cunningham, Eliz. Masterson, Toby. Forrester, Wm. Smith, Grace Farloe, Tho. Pritchard, Grace Fisher, Anna Sympson, Richard Proby, Francis Croper.

* * *

MAJOR DAVID CANT, 912 acs., 1 Oct. 1663, p. 316, (300). 600 acs. on S. side of Peanketanke Riv., bounded on E.S.E. with br. of same, W.N.W. upon land of Capt. Stephen Gill, dec'd., &c. 312 acs. on S. side of sd. Riv., adj. devdt. he .is now seated on, beg. at the mouth of the Stoare (or Score) branch &c. to Stephen Gills land &c. to Mr. Ludlowes corner Sickamore tree &c. 600 acs. granted to Thomas Ballard 14 Oct. 1657 & assigned to sd. Cant & 312 acs. for trans. of 6 pers: Fra. Hart, Wm. Callis, Mary Partin, Tho. Jones, Wm. Crump, Edw. Lewre.

(3) According to the Ballard DNA Surname Project, Thomas BALLARD, Sr. and his male BALLARD descendants appear to be in BALLARD Lineage Group I, although several participants in BALLARD Lineage Group III claim to be descendants of Thomas BALLARD, Sr. DNA tests are useful only when combined with a well-researched family history, and the family histories of the Group III BALLARDs claiming to be descendants of Thomas BALLARD, Sr. appear to be questionable. 
BALLARD, Col. Thomas Sr. (I37265)
 
25160 (1) Thomas Ballard of James City County, Virginia (1630-1690) :

James Branch Cabell provides the definitive portrait of Colonel Thomas Ballard in the masterful genealogy of his family, The Majors and Their Marriages (Richmond: W.C. Hill Printing Co., 1915), which is quoted here in full, and supplemented with references and notes clarifying or correcting Cabell's work, and revealing more recent scholarship.

Thomas Ballard of James City county, born in 1630, was in all likelihood a son of the Henry Ballard who is named as a headright in Captain Christopher Calthropp's land-patent of 1,000 acres in Charles River county, dated 6 May 1636. . . .

Endnote 13:

The precise identity of the father of Thomas Ballard and the presumed first husband of Anna Thomas, remains a mystery, a good candidate, as noted by Cabell, is the Henry Ballard who patented land in Warwick County 31 October 1642.

(2) Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Vol. I [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991, p. 137:

HENRY BALLARD, 50 acs. Warwicke Co., Oct. 31, 1642, Page 841. Parallel to Gerrance Stephens Land. Trans. of Georg. Murcocke. 
BALLARD, Henry (I37400)
 
25161 (1) Thomas Ballard of James City County, Virginia (1630-1690) :

John [BALLARD], believed by Cabell to have settled in Nansemond county, Virginia, where on 2 June 1673 he patented 300 acres. Named 1 May 1668 in the will of Robert Baldrey, and died without issue after 1694.

Endnotes:

Cabell is incorrect, for this patent names a wife and child, and this family is known to have prospered in Nansemond and Isle of Wight counties, leaving many descendants. See Patent of Jno. Ballard, Nansemond Co., Patent Book No. 6, p. 469. "300 acres, for the transfer of 6 persons: His own person & Besheba his wife, Jno. & Joseph his sons. Wm. Freeman & Jno. Napp."

Cabell writes "It is stated on excellent authority that he [John Ballard] died without issue before 1694" (without citation). He may have been referring to the Will of John Ballard, recorded in Henrico Co.; however, this John Ballard appears to have been of modest means and was probably not a relation. . . . 
BALLARD, John (I37287)
 
25162 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Archer [BALLARD], b. 12 August 1768. On 21 March 1789, Archar Ballard is reported married to Rachel Worley in the minutes of the Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. On 10 May 1810, at Westfield Monthly Meeting. Archer Ballard is granted by Westfield a certificate to the Fairfield Monthly Meeting in Indiana. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. 
BALLARD, Archer (I38159)
 
25163 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Byrum [BALLARD], b. 1 April 1766. On 9 November 1790, Byrum Ballard was reported married to Sarah Carson in the minutes of the Westfield Monthly Meeting, North Carolina. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. On 14 November 1812, he was granted a certificate by Westfield to the Fall Creek Monthly Meeting in Ohio. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. 
BALLARD, Byrum (I38158)
 
25164 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Elizabeth [BALLARD], b. 30 May 1785. 
BALLARD, Elizabeth (I38164)
 
25165 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Frances [BALLARD], b. 11 January 1774. On 7 November 1793, Frances Ballard, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina, married John Burris at the Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. 
BALLARD, Frances (I38161)
 
25166 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Garman [Jerman, Jarman, German] [BALLARD] b. 5 February 1765. On 28 May 1785, Jerman Ballard was granted a certificate to the South River Monthly Meeting in Bedford County, Virginia by the New Garden Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 524. But he returned to the New Garden Monthly Meeting when a certificate was granted 21 January 1786. Hinshaw, Vol. VI, p. 297. His reception at New Garden occurred 25 March 1786. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 524.

On 9 November 1791, at the Westfield Monthly Meeting, Jarmen, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Ballard or Surry County, North Carolina, married Rachel Hiett. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. They remained with Westfield until 1803, when on 4 May 1803 they were granted a certificate to the Mount Pleasant Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

The children of Jarman and Rachel Ballard appearing among the records of the Westfield Monthly Meeting are: William, b.1 September 1792; Phebe, b. 20 November 1794; Ansolemn, b. 20 November 1797; Elizabeth, b. 6 October 1798; and Edeth, b. 8 July 1800. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. on 25 June 1803 at Mt. Pleasant Monthly Meeting, Rachel and her daughters Phebe, Elizabeth, Edith & Rebecca, were received 25 June 1803 on a certificate dated 21 May 1803 from Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 1007. 
BALLARD, Garman (I38157)
 
25167 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Mary [BALLARD], b. 19 January 1771. On 4 January 1792, Mary Ballard, the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina, married Jacob Harrold at the Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. 
BALLARD, Mary (I38160)
 
25168 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina was born in 1735.

On 10 May 1777, a Thomas Ballard was condemned by the Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting for marrying out of unity and former misconduct, yet presented a letter of recommendation from Friends at Tom's Creek Monthly Meeting in Surry Co. North Carolina. He was granted certificate to that Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. VI, p. 228.

Note: Tom's Creek Meeting was the predecessor of Westfield Monthly Meeting. It was located in Surry County, North Carolina, not far from the Virginia line. The meeting for worship was organized about 1771; the preparative meeting in 1784. As noted above, the name was changed to Westfield when the monthly meeting was established in 1786. Previous to this time, Tom's Creek Preparative Meeting had been attached to New Garden Monthly Meeting. In addition to Surry and adjoining counties in North Carolina, the territory of the Westfield Monthly Meeting included adjacent territory in Virginia and settlements in Greene and Jefferson Counties, in Tennessee.

More likely, this Thomas Ballard was on 29 August 1778 received by the New Garden Monthly Meeting on certificate dated 16 May 1778 from Cedar Creek Monthly Meeting in Hanover County Virginia (his likely brother Moorman was received the same year). Hinshaw, Vol. VI, p. 524.

Thomas Ballard married Elizabeth _____ and had issue:

[i] Garman [Jerman, Jarman, German] b. 5 February 1765. On 28 May 1785, Jerman Ballard was granted a certificate to the South River Monthly Meeting in Bedford County, Virginia by the New Garden Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p.524. But he returned to the New Garden Monthly Meeting when a certificate was granted 21 January 1786. Hinshaw, Vol. VI, p. 297. His reception at New Garden occurred 25 March 1786. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 524.

On 9 November 1791, at the Westfield Monthly Meeting, Jarmen, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Ballard or Surry County, North Carolina, married Rachel Hiett. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. They remained with Westfield until 1803, when on 4 May 1803 they were granted a certificate to the Mount Pleasant Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

The children of Jarman and Rachel Ballard appearing among the records of the Westfield Monthly Meeting are: William, b.1 September 1792; Phebe, b. 20 November 1794; Ansolemn, b. 20 November 1797; Elizabeth, b. 6 October 1798; and Edeth, b. 8 July 1800. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. on 25 June 1803 at Mt. Pleasant Monthly Meeting, Rachel and her daughters Phebe, Elizabeth, Edith & Rebecca, were received 25 June 1803 on a certificate dated 21 May 1803 from Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 1007.

[ii] Byrum, b. 1 April 1766. On 9 November 1790, Byrum Ballard was reported married to Sarah Carson in the minutes of the Westfield Monthly Meeting, North Carolina. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. On 14 November 1812, he was granted a certificate by Westfield to the Fall Creek Monthly Meeting in Ohio. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

[iii] Archer, b. 12 August 1768. On 21 March 1789, Archar Ballard is reported married to Rachel Worley in the minutes of the Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. On 10 May 1810, at Westfield Monthly Meeting. Archer Ballard is granted by Westfield a certificate to the Fairfield Monthly Meeting in Indiana. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

[iv] Mary, b. 19 January 1771. On 4 January 1792, Mary Ballard, the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina, married Jacob Harrold at the Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

[v] Frances, b. 11 January 1774. On 7 November 1793, Frances Ballard, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina, married John Burris at the Westfield Monthly Meeting. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

[vi] William, b. 8 November 1776. On 20 October 1798, William Ballard was disowned by the Westfield Monthly Meeting. He must have been re-instated, for on 23 August 1800, a William Ballard and sons Anthony, Asa and William were received on certificate from the Goose Creek Monthly Meeting, certificate dated 8 May 1800 [the latter could be a different William]. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959.

[vii] Thomas, b. 10 March 1783.

[viii] Elizabeth, b. 30 May 1785.

(2) Hinshaw, William Wade, Encyclopedia of America Quaker Genealogy, Vol. VI [Reprint]: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1993, p. 285:

CAMP CREEK MONTHLY MEETING [Louisa County, VA]

RECORDS . . .

BALLARD . . .

Thomas b 1735, 11, 12 
BALLARD, Thomas (I37331)
 
25169 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

Thomas [BALLARD], b. 10 March 1783. 
BALLARD, Thomas (I38163)
 
25170 (1) Thomas Ballard of Surry County, North Carolina (1735-????) :

William [BALLARD], b. 8 November 1776. On 20 October 1798, William Ballard was disowned by the Westfield Monthly Meeting. He must have been re-instated, for on 23 August 1800, a William Ballard and sons Anthony, Asa and William were received on certificate from the Goose Creek Monthly Meeting, certificate dated 8 May 1800 [the latter could be a different William]. Hinshaw, Vol. I, p. 959. 
BALLARD, William (I38162)
 
25171 (1) Thomas BALLARD's first wife, Anna, was not, as some sources claim, a daughter of William THOMAS.

Thomas BALLARD was a step-son of William THOMAS, who married Thomas BALLARD's mother, Anna (BALLARD) THOMAS. 
(BALLARD), Anna (I37266)
 
25172 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

Anna [BALLARD], born in 1689; was living in 1743; married in 1705 John Major who was born c. 1677, and died before 1737 in Charles City county, and was the son of William Major c. 1639-1716), an attorney and planter, and Elizabeth Mason of York county. 
BALLARD, Anna (I37306)
 
25173 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

Elizabeth [BALLARD], born in 1687; married before 26 September 1706 Captain William Smith, who in 1708 was of Abingdon Parish, Gloucester county, and in 1725 and 1726 of King William county; died in June 1734 in Spotsylvania county; he was the son of Major Lawrence Smith (1629-1700) and Mary Hitchen of York county and of Severn Hill in Gloucester county. 
BALLARD, Elizabeth (I37304)
 
25174 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

Katherine [BALLARD], born c. 1692, married after 26 September 1706 Major William Buckner of York county, who was a magistrate, in 1699 a Major of the Militia, Burgess for York county, deputy surveyor for William and Mary College; died in 1716 or before 21 May 1717 in Yorktown, and was the son of John Buckner and Deborah Ferrer. 
BALLARD, Katherine (I37308)
 
25175 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

Mary, a minor on 26 September 1706; no record of her marriage or descendants has been preserved; she probably died young. 
BALLARD, Mary (I37314)
 
25176 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

Robert [BALLARD], born c. 1697. On 15 October 1725, Robert Ballard, Carpenter, and his wife Jane Ballard conveyed Plot 24 in Yorktown to Vincent Pearse of the Kingdom of Great Britain, Gentleman, by a deed dated 15 October 1725, recorded in York county 15 November 1725. On 20 May 1726, he was licensed to keep an Ordinary at his house, and patented 1,000 acres in St. George Parish, Spotsylvania county on 14 September 1727. He died intestate before 19 May 1735 in York county. He married Jane _____, who was living 19 May 1735, and as his widow married (2) before 16 June 1741 Matthew Hubard, who was living 3 November 1688 in York county, and was the son of Matthew Hubard. The children of Robert Ballard were: 1. Jane (who married before 15 September 1740, William Dudley, who died between 24 October 1757 and 23 October 1758 (William being the son of Captain George Dudley, who in 1722 to 1757 was Church Warden and Vestryman of Kingston Parish, Mathews county, and Judith Armistead, who was the daughter of William Armistead (1671-1711) and Ann Lee of Kingston Parish, Mathews county)); 2. Henrietta (born in 1722; was living 16 June 1741 in York county; married William Powell); 3. Charlotte (born in 1724; was living 14 September 1740 in York county; married Nicholas Dickson). 
BALLARD, Robert (I37310)
 
25177 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

Thomas [BALLARD III], born c. 1695. Likely the Thomas Ballard of York County who took a patent on 28 September 1728 for 330 acres of new land in Spotylsvania County in St. George's Parish, on the North side of the Northanna River & on the South side of the Main Road; adjacent Mr. Augustin Moore, in the County line. Patent Book No. 13, p. 452. . . . 
BALLARD, Thomas III (I37309)
 
25178 (1) Thomas Ballard, Jr of York County, Virginia (c. 1655-1710) :

William [BALLARD], a minor on 26 September 1706; Cabell simply notes that "he seems to have died unmarried." William Ballard died in York county before 21 September 1719, for on that date "Robert Ballard came into Court and made oath that William Ballard departed this life without making any will so far as he knows or believes. Said Robert Ballard gave bond with Philip Lightfoot & John Gibbon his security and was appointed administrator of the Estate of the said William Ballard decd." We know this William Ballard died without issue when his estate is presented in court by Thomas Vines, Edwd Baptist, Walter Butler and Robert Ballard, and consists solely of "a Negroe girle of about 19 years old which we value to 30 pd." No provision was made for a wife or orphans. 
BALLARD, William (I37313)
 
25179 (1) Thomas BROWN is listed in a household headed by his son, Charles R. BROWN, in the 1851 census of St. Botolph Without Bishopsgate, London, England.

Thomas BROWN is listed in the 1851 census as a retired tradesman who was then 77 years of age; therefore, according to the 1851 census, he was born in about 1774. According to the 1851 census, he was born in Bristol, Somerset, England.

* * *

The 1851 Census for England was taken on the night of 30 March 1851. The following information was requested:

• Name of street, place, road, etc.
• House number or name
• Name of each person that had spent the night in that household
• Relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family
• Person's marital status
• Age at last birthday (sex is indicated by column in which age is recorded)
• Person's rank, profession, or occupation
• Person's place of birth (if outside of England or Wales, only the country may be given)
• Whether blind, deaf, or idiot

Enumeration forms were distributed to all households a couple of days before census night and the household members were required to complete the forms themselves. The next day, the enumerators collected the completed forms. All responses were to reflect the individual's status as of 30 March 1851 for all individuals who had spent the night in the house. People who were traveling or living abroad were enumerated at the location where they spent the night on census night. All of the details from the individual forms were later sorted and copied into enumerators' books, which are the records we can view images of today. The original householders schedules from 1841 to 1901 were destroyed.

The clerks who compiled and reviewed the census data made a variety of marks on the returns. Unfortunately, many of these tally marks were written over personal information and some fields, such as ages, can be difficult to read as a result. More useful marks include a single slash between households within a building and a double slash separating households in separate buildings.

(2) http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk:

Will of Thomas Brown, Stay Maker of Houndsditch, City of London

Reference: PROB 11/2187/269
Description: Will of Thomas Brown, Stay Maker of Houndsditch, City of London
Date [proved]: 09 March 1854
Held by: The National Archives, Kew
Legal status: Public Record 
BROWN, Thomas (I39040)
 
25180 (1) Thomas COLLIER was mentioned in the will dated 2 September 1657 of his father-in-law, Gabriel WILKINSON. COLLIER, Thomas (I40006)
 
25181 (1) Thomas DURHAM (born about 1697) and Matthew DURHAM, Sr. (born about 1727) are believed to have had a common DURHAM ancestor, although the compiler does not know who that ancestor was. Their birthdates appear to have been about 30 years apart. Some persons who have considered the question believe that Thomas DURHAM was the father of Matthew DURHAM, Sr., but the compiler has no conclusive proof of such relationship. Matthew DURHAM, Sr. is shown here as a son of Thomas DURHAM in order to stimulate further research.

(2) Source: "Durham Family Database 1/31/2017," a WorldConnect Family Tree on rootsweb.com.

(3) Bible Records of Shelman Durham :

Col. Shelman Durham's grandfather and family, Mathew Durham, came from Virginia and settled in Orange County, North Carolina, on or near Fairview, which is sixteen miles from Hillsborough on the road to Cortham Courthouse. Some distance from Chapple Hill. He married a Miss Lindsey.

(3) "Durham Family Database 1/31/2017," a WorldConnect Family Tree on rootsweb.com:

Early DURHAM/LINDSEY connections:

Thomas Durham, (b. ca 1697) m. Margaret "Peggy" Lindsey, (b. ca 1700), around 1722 Virginia.
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bdurham&id=I28730

Matthew Durham, (b. ca 1727) m. Susannah Lindsey (b. ca 1731) around 1750 VA
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=catemanard&id=I2984

George G. Durham m. Winifred Lindsey (ca 1744??) (George G. Durham died in Brunswick Co., VA - left a Will in 1767)
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bdurham&id=I489

Samuel Davis Durham, b. ca 1755 Hanover Co, VA) m. Isabel Lindsey (b. ca 1760) m. 10 Sept 1781 in Hanover Co. VA.
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bdurham&id=I15542

(4) North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015:

Name: Matthew Durham
Probate Date: 9 Dec 1795 [Note by compiler: According to the original record, the will was dated 9 December 1795, and probated in February 1796.]
Probate Place: Orange, North Carolina, USA
Inferred Death Year: Abt 1795
Inferred Death Place: North Carolina, USA
Item Description: Wills, Vol 1-4, Alb-Young, 1753-1819

In the name of God Amen. I, Matthew Durham of the County of Orange and State of North Carolina - being sick and weak of body, though sound of mind and memory do make this my Last Will and Testament that is to say First I give unto my well beloved wife Susanna Durham Two cows and calves named Frosty and Cherry and one horse named Bay and four head of Sheep Choice of Ewes and Eight head of Hogs Choice out of twelve and two Choice of feather beds and furniture and all the rest of my household furniture and working tools and the rest and privilege of the plantation and houses during her life also I give unto son Mark Durham the tract and parcel of Land I now live on containing one hundred acres more or less and one young horse saddle and Bridle one Cow two heffers and four head of Hogs and three head of sheep and one feather Bed and furniture In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this ninth day of December one thousand seven hundred and ninety five -

Matthew Durham [his mark] {Seal}

signed sealed and delivered in presence of us

Test Wm Stroud
Lysias Durham
 
DURHAM, Matthew Sr. (I42664)
 
25182 (1) Thomas DURHAM (born about 1697) and Matthew DURHAM, Sr. (born about 1727) are believed to have had a common DURHAM ancestor, although the compiler does not know who that ancestor was. Their birthdates appear to have been about 30 years apart. Some persons who have considered the question believe that Thomas DURHAM was the father of Matthew DURHAM, Sr., but the compiler has no conclusive proof of such relationship. Thomas DURHAM is shown here as the Matthew DURHAM, Sr. in order to stimulate further research.

(2) "Durham Family Database 1/31/2017," a WorldConnect Family Tree on rootsweb.com:

Early DURHAM/LINDSEY connections:

Thomas Durham, (b. ca 1697) m. Margaret "Peggy" Lindsey (b. ca 1700), around 1722 VA.
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bdurham&id=I28730

Matthew Durham, (b. ca 1727) m. Susannah Lindsey (b. ca 1731) around 1750 VA.
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=catemanard&id=I2984

George G. Durham m. Winifred Lindsey (ca 1744??) (George G. Durham died in Brunswick Co., VA - left a Will in 1767)
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bdurham&id=I489

Samuel Davis Durham, b. ca 1755 Hanover Co. VA) m. Isabel Lindsey (b. ca 1760) m. 10 Sept 1781 in Hanover Co. VA.
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bdurham&id=I15542
 
DURHAM, Thomas (I42662)
 
25183 (1) Thomas LINDSEY is an unproven son of John LINDSEY, Sr. and his wife, Alce. Thomas LINDSEY is placed here as a son of John LINDSEY, Sr. and his wife, Alce, in order to stimulate further research.

(2) Susan Grabek :

Thomas Lindsey was born in Frederick Co., VA ca. 1740, the son (unproved) of John Lindsey Sr. and his wife, Alce. Thomas probably moved to South Carolina with his father and brothers, John Jr., James, and Samuel ca. 1770. Thomas received a grant for 200 acres on Kings Creek in 1774. Living nearby on Kings Creek were Captain Charles King and his wife, Charity Pennington King. Thomas Lindsey married their daughter, Lydia King, ca. 1772.

Thomas Lindsey was a planter, and his probate records reveal that he became quite wealthy growing cotton. At the time of his death, Thomas owned a considerable amount of land and personal property. He also owned numerous slaves.

Thomas Lindsey was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He served as a Captain of Horse in the South Carolina militia. He was also a Lieutenant of Foot in his brother Capt. John Lindsey's company.

Thomas Lindsey died in Newberry Co., SC ca. 1815. His probate records showed that his wife was named Lydia, and that he had six sons and four daughters. Thomas's sons were named Charles, Jacob, John, Isaac, Jared, and Samuel. His daughters were Polly, Charity, Keziah, and Alce. Two of Thomas Lindsey's children married their first cousins. Isaac Lindsey married Esther Lindsey, the daughter of Samuel Lindsey. Polly Lindsey married George Wells, the son of Abigail Lindsey Wells. Samuel Lindsey and Abigail Lindsey Wells were both siblings of Thomas Lindsey. . . . 
LINDSEY, Capt. Thomas (I14679)
 
25184 (1) Thomas R. Weigand :

Bought 191 acres of land in Culpeper Co., VA, 1780. Sale witnessed by Moses Threlkeld, son of Christopher, and by MosesThrelkeld, son of James. Bought a slave in 1797 in Culpeper Co. Was overseer of Culpeper County Poor House in 1800. Had one son Moses, and probably other. He was probably a soldier in the Revolution. There was a James Threllkeld in the Revolution and no record of any other James appears at that time. Court Record Culpeper Co., VA: Culpeper County 416, This shall entitle James Threlkeld to receive at the Treasury 100 Pounds with interest for value received, etc., 29 Nov 1790. Berkett H. Davenport, Commissioner, Provisional Law. 
THRELKELD, James (I228)
 
25185 (1) Thomas R. Weigand :

[Moses Threlkeld] [p]robably went to Shelby Co., Ky.

(2) It is questionable whether this Moses THRELKELD/THRAILKILL is the father of the compiler's Elizabeth THRAILKILL. A Moses THRAILKELL is listed as a resident of Crosby Township, Hamilton County, OH in an 1810 tax list of Hamilton County, OH. The compiler's Elizabeth THRAILKILL and her first husband, Isaac FROST, lived in the same township. One of Elizabeth's children by her second husband, John Lincoln LYNCH, was named Moses (possibly named after Elizabeth's father), and another one of Elizabeth's children by her second husband, John Lincoln LYNCH, was named Sarah (possibly named after Elizabeth's mother).

(3) A household headed by Moses THRAILKILL is listed in the 1820 census of Crosby Township, Hamilton County, OH.

Listed in Moses' household are two free white males under 10 years of age; one free white male over 45 years of age; one free white female between under 10 years of age; one free white female between 10 and 16 years of age; one free white female between 16 and 26 years of age; and one free white female over 45 years of age.

Assuming that Moses is the free white male listed in the 1820 census as then being between over 45 years of age, he would have been born before 1775, according to the 1840 census.

Assuming that Moses' wife is the free white female listed in the 1820 census as then being between over 45 years of age, she would have been born before 1775, according to the 1820 census.

Assuming that the rest of the persons in Moses' household are children of Moses and/or his wife, those children would have consisted of two sons (both of which sons would have been born between 1810 and 1820, according to the 1820 census) and three daughters (one of which daughters would have been born between 1810 and 1820, one of which daughters would have been born between 1804 and 1810, and one of which daughters would have been born between 1794 and 1804, according to the 1820 census). 
THRAILKILL, Moses (I227)
 
25186 (1) Thomas Shepard's Memoir of His Own Life, annotated and printed in Young, Alexander, Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay from 1623 to 1636, Boston, MA: C. C. Little and J. Brown, 1846:

The second [child I had by Joanna HOOKER], whom the Lord I bless hath hitherto spared, viz. my little Samuel, is yet living.

[Note by the annotator: He was born in October, 1641, and was brought up, I believe, in the family of his grandfather Hooker, at Hartford. In an unpublished letter that I have seen, written by Samuel Stone of Hartford, and dated July 19, 1647, in which he gives a very affecting account of the death of his colleague, he says, "Little Sam. Shepard is well." He was ordained at Rowley Nov. 15, 1665, the third minister of that town, and died April 7, 1688, aged 26. See Gage's story of Rowley, pp. 19, 74.]

(2) Ancestry.com, Cambridge, Massachusetts History, Supplement [database online], Orem, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc., 1997:

Shepard, Rev. Samuel (Rev. Thos., Wm.) b. Oct. 1641, prob. brought up by his grandfather, Rev. Thomas Hooker at Hartford, H. C. 1658, ord. at Rowley 1665, d. 7 Ap. 1668, leaving son Samuel, 258 n., 654; silver spoon left to by Matthew Daye, 1649, 533 n. 
SHEPARD, Rev. Samuel (I4876)
 
25187 (1) Thomas Shepard's Memoir of His Own Life, annotated and printed in Young, Alexander, Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay from 1623 to 1636, Boston, MA: C. C. Little and J. Brown, 1846:

The third son [child I had by Joanna HOOKER], viz. my son John, after sixteen weeks, departed, on the Sabbath day morning, a day of rest, to the bosom of rest, to Him who gave it; which was no small affliction and heart-breaking to me, that I should provoke the Lord to strike at my innocent children for my sake.

(2) Ancestry.com, Cambridge, Massachusetts History, Supplement [database online], Orem, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc., 1997:

Shepard, John (Rev. Thos., Wm.) son of Joanna, b. 2 Ap. 1646, d. young, 258 n., 653 
SHEPARD, John (I4878)
 
25188 (1) Thomas Shepard's Memoir of His Own Life, annotated and printed in Young, Alexander, Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay from 1623 to 1636, Boston, MA: C. C. Little and J. Brown, 1846:

The year after those wars in the country, God having taken away my first wife, the Lord gave me a second, the eldest daughter of Mr. Hooker, a blessed store; and the Lord hath made her a great blessing to me to carry on matters in the family with much care and wisdom, and to seek the Lord God of her father.

The first child I had by her, being a son, died through the weakness of the midwife, before it saw the sun, even in the very birth. The second, whom the Lord I bless hath hitherto spared, viz. my little Samuel, is yet living. The third son, viz. my son John, after sixteen weeks, departed, on the Sabbath day morning, a day of rest, to the bosom of rest, to Him who gave it; which was no small affliction and heart-breaking to me, that I should provoke the Lord to strike at my innocent children for my sake.

The Lord thus afflicting, yet continued peace to the country, that amazing mercy, when all England and Europe are in a flame. The Lord hath set me and my children aside from the flames of the fires in Yorkshire and Northumberland, whence if we had not been delivered, I had been in great afflictions and temptations, very weak and unfit to be tossed up and down, and to bear violent persecution. The Lord therefore hath showed his tenderness to me and mine, in carrying me to a land of peace, though a place of trial; where the Lord hath made the savage Indians, (who conspired the death of all the English by Miantinomo upon a sudden, if Uncas could have been cut off first, who stood in their way, and determined an open war upon us by the privy suggestions of some neutral English on the Island,) to seek for peace from us upon our own terms, without bloodshed, August 26, 1645.

But the Lord hath not been wont to let me live long without some affliction or other; and yet ever mixed with some mercy. And therefore, April the 2d, 1646, as he gave me another son, John, so he took away my most dear, precious, meek, and loving wife, in child-bed, after three weeks' lying-in; having left behind her two hopeful branches, my dear children, Samuel and John. This affliction was very heavy to me; for in it the Lord seemed to withdraw his tender care for me and mine, which he graciously manifested by my dear wife; also refused to hear prayer, when I did think he would have hearkened and let me see his beauty in the land of the living, in restoring of her to health again; also, in taking her away in the prime time of her life, when she might have lived to have glorified the Lord long; also, in threatening me to proceed in rooting out my family, and that he would not stop, having begun here, as in Eli, for not being zealous enough against the sins of his sons. And I saw that if I had profited by former afflictions of this nature, I should not have had this scourge. But I am the Lord's, and He may do with me what he will. He did teach me to prize a little grace, gained by a cross, as a sufficient recompense for all outward losses.

But this loss was very great. She was a woman of incomparable meekness of spirit, toward myself especially, and very loving; of great prudence to take care for and order my family affairs, being neither too lavish nor sordid in anything, so that I knew not what was under her hands. She had an excellency to reprove for sin, and discern the evils of men. She loved God's people dearly, and [was] studious to profit by their fellowship, and therefore loved their company. She loved God's word exceedingly, and hence was glad she could read my notes, which she had to muse on every week. She had a spirit of prayer, beyond ordinary of her time and experience. She was fit to die long before she did die, even after the death of her first-born, which was a great affliction to her. But her work not being done then, she lived almost nine years with me, and was the comfort of my life to me; and the last sacrament before her lying-in, seemed to be full of Christ, and thereby fitted for heaven. She did oft say she should not outlive this child; and when her fever first began, by taking some cold, she told me so, that we should love exceedingly together, because we should not live long together. Her fever took away her sleep; want of sleep wrought much distemper in her head, and filled it with fantasies and distractions, but without raging. The night before she died; she had about six hours' unquiet sleep. But that so cooled and settled her head, that when she knew none else, so as to speak to them, yet she knew Jesus Christ, and could speak to him; and therefore, as soon as she awakened out of sleep, she brake out into a most heavenly, heart-breaking prayer, after Christ, her dear Redeemer, for the spirit of life, and so continued praying until the last hour of her death, "Lord, though I [am] unworthy, Lord, one word, one word," &c.; and so gave up the ghost. 
HOOKER, Joanna (I4766)
 
25189 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Burrell Hale was born in 1841 in Tennessee, USA. He was born in 1842 in Tennessee, USA. He was born in 1843 in Tennessee, USA. Burrell was born in August 1843 in Tennessee, USA. He was born in 1845 in Tennessee, USA. He lived in District 9, Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1850. Burrell lived in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1860. He lived in District 1, Bledsoe, Tennessee, United States in 1870. He lived in District 1, Bledsoe, Tennessee, United States in 1880. Burrell lived in Bledsoe, Tennessee, USA in 1880. He lived Age: 56; Marital Status: Married; Relation to Head of House: Head in Civil District 3, Warren, Tennessee, USA in 1900. He was also known as Burrel Hale. Burrell was also known as Carrell Hall. He was also known as Bandl Hale. He was also known as Barrell Hale. . . .

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Sarah J Griffith. Children were: James Alexander Hale, Martha Leona Hale, Eliza Jane Hale, Nancy A. Hale, Lilly Ann Hale.

Spouse: Margaret Cagle. Margaret Cagle and Burrell Hale were married in 1888. 
HALE, Burrell (I32660)
 
25190 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Harrison Hale was born in 1839 in Tennessee, USA. He lived in District 9, Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1850. He lived in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1860. Harrison lived in District 1, Bledsoe, Tennessee, United States in 1870. He lived in Bledsoe, Tennessee, USA in 1870. He lived in District 2, Van Buren, Tennessee, United States in 1880. Harrison died before 1900 at the age of 61 in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA. He was buried in 1900 in Titus Sullivan Farm, Van Buren Co, TN. He died in 1900 at the age of 61 in Titus Sullivan Farm, Van Buren, TN, USA.1880 Van Buren Co. . . .

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Mary Ann (Nannie) Carter. Children were: Jefferson Hale, Isom S Hale, Charley Hale, Johnson Hale, Franklin Hale.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Harrison Hale
Birth: 1839
Death: Unknown

Harrison Hale died before 1900

S/O Isham Burrell and Nancy (_____) Hale

Family links: Spouse: Mary Ann Carter Hale (1835 - 1890); Children: Isom S. Hale (1874 - 1950)

Burial: Sodom, Van Buren County, Tennessee, USA

Created by: Wendell Walker
Record added: Jan 05, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 103114859 
HALE, Harrison (I32659)
 
25191 (1) Thompson Family Research :

I suspect that Isham Burrell Hale is the youngest son of John Hale (b. 1753) of Bledsoe County, TN, although no proof has been found. Isham is found with his wife and children in Bledsoe county in 1830. . . . Isham and his family are then found in Marion Co, TN in the 1840 census. . . . In 1850 . . . and 1860, . . . the family is found in Van Buren County, TN, but disappears after that time. In both years, Manerva (unknown) Hale is living next door or close to the Isham Hale family, with children.

[Note by compiler: As this source also indicates, Isham HALE administered the estate of John HALE, deceased, in Bledsoe County, TN as late as April 1843. Isham appears to have been a close relative of John; otherwise Isham would not have served as administrator of John's estate.]

(2) A household headed by Isham HALE is listed in the 1830 census of Bledsoe County, TN.

Listed in Isham's household are 2 free white males under 5 years of age; 1 free white male between 5 and 10 years of age; 1 free white male between 30 and 40 years of age; 1 free white female between 5 and 10 years of age; 1 free white female between 10 and 15 years of age; and 1 free white female between 20 and 30 years of age.

Assuming that Isham is the free white male listed in the 1830 census as then being between 30 and 40 years of age, he would have been born between 1790 and 1800, according to the 1830 census.

Assuming that Isham's wife is the free white female listed in the 1830 census as then being between 20 and 30 years of age, she would have been born between 1800 and 1810, according to the 1830 census.

Assuming that the other persons in Isham's household are children of Isham and/or his wife, those children would have consisted of 3 sons (2 of which sons would have been born between 1825 and 1830, and 1 of which sons would have been born between 1820 and 1825, according to the 1830 census) and 2 daughters (1 of which daughters would have been born between 1820 and 1825, and 1 of which daughters would have been born between 1815 and 1820, according to the 1830 census).

(3) A household headed by Isham HALE is listed in the 1840 census of Marion County, TN. [His surname is listed as HALL in the index to the 1840 census.]

Listed in Isham's household are 1 free white male under 5 years of age; 1 free white male between 5 and 10 years of age; 1 free white male between 10 and 15 years of age; 1 free white male between 15 and 20 years of age; 1 free white male between 40 and 50 years of age; 1 free white female under 5 years of age; 2 free white females between 15 and 20 years of age; and 1 free white female between 30 and 40 years of age.

Assuming that Isham is the free white male listed in the 1840 census as then being between 40 and 50 years of age, he would have been born between 1790 and 1800, according to the 1840 census.

Assuming that Isham's wife is the free white female listed in the 1840 census as then being between 30 and 40 years of age, she would have been born between 1800 and 1810, according to the 1840 census.

Assuming that the other persons in Isham's household are children of Isham and/or his wife, those children would have consisted of 4 sons (1 of which sons would have been born between 1835 and 1840, 1 of which sons would have been born between 1830 and 1835, 1 of which sons would have been born between 1825 and 1830, and 1 of which sons would have been born between 1820 and 1825, according to the 1840 census) and 3 daughters (1 of which daughters would have been born between 1835 and 1840, and 2 of which daughters would have been born between 1820 and 1825, according to the 1840 census).

(4) A household headed by Isham B. HALE is listed in the 1850 census of District 9, Van Buren County, TN, next to a household headed by Manervy HALE. [Isham B.'s surname is listed as HALL in the index to the 1850 census, .]

Isham B. is listed in the 1850 census as a farmer who was then 50 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1800. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Listed with Isham B. is his wife, Nancy, who was then 49 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1801. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his son, Scott, a laborer who was then 23 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1827. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his son, Richard, a laborer who was then 21 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1829. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his son, John, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1833. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his daughter, Virginia, who was then 15 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1835. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his son, Levander, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1837. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his son, Harrison, who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1839. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham B. is his son, Burrell, who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1841. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN. [His first name is listed as Carrell in the index to the 1850 census.]

(5) A household headed by Isham HALE is listed in the 1860 census of Van Buren County, TN.

Isham is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer who was then 60 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1800. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Listed with Isham is his wife, Nancy, a "spinstress" who was then 59 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1801. According to the 1860 census, she was born in TN. [A spinstress is a woman who spins; however, a line is drawn through the word spinstress in the 1860 census, so the compiler is not certain whether Nancy was really a spinstress.]

Also listed with Isham is his son, Richard, a common laborer who was then 30 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1830. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham is his son, John, a common laborer who was then 29 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1831. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham is his son, Harrison, a common laborer who was then 20 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1840. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN.

Also listed with Isham is his son, Burrel, a common laborer who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1842. According to the 1860 census, he was born in TN. 
HALE, Isham Burrell (I32630)
 
25192 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Isham James Hale was born in 1825 in Tennessee, USA. He died about 1862 at the age of 37 in Skurlock Cemetery, White County, Tennessee, USA. 1860 Census: Van Buren Co, TN, 15/59, 8A. Brother Levander living with this family.

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Mary Lewis. Mary Lewis and Isham James Hale were married in 1844. Children were: Isham James Hale Jr, Mary Hale, Evelyn Hale, Catherine Hale, Elizabeth Hale, Manerva Hale, Nancy Hale, Martha Jane Hale. 
HALE, Isham James (I32653)
 
25193 (1) Thompson Family Research :

John Hale was born in 1833 in Tennessee, USA. He died on 4 March 1838 at the age of 5 in Bledsoe, Tennessee, USA. Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker. 
HALE, John (I32656)
 
25194 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Levander Hale was born in 1834 in Tennessee, USA. He was born about 1839 in Tennessee, USA. He was born in 1840 in Tennessee, USA. Levander lived in District 9, Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1850. He lived in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1860. He lived Age: 31; Census Post Office: Bone Cave in District 4, Van Buren, Tennessee, United States in 1870. Levander lived in District 10, White, Tennessee, United States in 1880. He died on 4 May 1888 at the age of 54 in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA. He was buried in 1892 in Graveyard Ridge Cemetery, Van Buren County, TN. Levander was also known as Levvander Van Hale. He was also known as Lavander Hale. He was also known as Van Hall. . . . Levander was buried in Van Buren County, Tennessee, USA.

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Nancy Ann Dodson. Nancy Ann Dodson and Levander Hale were married on 2 March 1862 in White, Tennessee, USA. Children were: Sarah J Hale, William Robert Hale, Isom S Hale, Susan Litha Hale, Barbara Hale, Jesse Hale, John V Hale, Kate Hale, Mary Hale.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Levvander "Van" Hale
Birth: 1834
Death: May 4, 1888

Family links: Children: William Robert Hale (1869 - 1941), Jess W. Hale (1874 - 1961), Susan Litha Hale Wilson (1874 - 1918), Isom Hale (1877 - 1969)

Burial: Graveyard Ridge Cemetery, Van Buren County, Tennessee, USA

Created by: Reba Bain
Record added: Apr 07, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 35632232 
HALE, Levander (I32657)
 
25195 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Richard Hale was born about 1829 in Tennessee, USA. He was born in 1830 in Tennessee, USA. He lived Age: 21 in District 9, Van Buren, Tennessee in 1850. Richard lived in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA in 1860. He was also known as Richard Hall. He served in the military in Tennessee, USA.680 1860: Living with parents.

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker. 
HALE, Richard (I32655)
 
25196 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Scott Thomas Hale was born on 12 July 1827 in Tennessee, USA. He died on 2 February 1903 at the age of 75 in Pottawatomie, Oklahoma, USA.

1860 Census: Van Buren Co, TN, 22/59, 11B.

1870 Census:

1880 Census: Sugar Loaf, Boone Co, AR, Dist 22, 22/32, 604B.

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Lucresa Mooneyham. Lucresa Mooneyham and Scott Thomas Hale were married on 27 February 1851 in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA. Children were: Sarah Jane Hale, Sophia Ann Hale, Mary Emeline Hale, Amanda "Mandy" Hale, Eveline Hale Hale, Canzada Kizzah Hale, William Hale.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Scott Hale
Birth: Jul. 12, 1827
Death: Feb. 5, 1903

Family links: Spouse: L G Hale (1827 - 1900); Children: William N. Hale (1854 - 1896), Sarah Jane Hale Chaffin (1857 - 1947)

Inscription: Husband

Burial: Hopewell Cemetery, Bethel Acres, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, USA

Created by: Sherry
Record added: Dec 27, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 32432854 
HALE, Scott Thomas (I32654)
 
25197 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Unknown Hale was born about 1824 in Tennessee, USA. He died before 1860 at the age of 36 in Tennessee, USA. I suspect that Isham B and Nancy Hale had an older son that was away from home. Thus, Manerva and two children were living next door to Isham and family in 1850, Van Buren County. Scott, the oldest son living with Isham and Nancy, married Lucretia Mooneyham.

Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Minerva Unknown. Minerva Unknown and Unknown Hale were married about 1840. Children were: Virginia B. Hale, Elizabeth Hale, Louisa Hale.

(2) A free white male is listed in the 5-10 age bracket in a household headed by Isham Burrell HALE in the 1830 census of Bledsoe County, TN; and this free white male would have been about the right age to have been a son of Isham Burell HALE and the future husband of Minerva (BOWMAN) HALE.

A household headed by Minerva (BOWMAN) HALE is listed in the 1850 census of District 9, Van Buren County, TN, next to a household headed by Isham Burell HALE. Listed with Minerva in the 1850 census are her daughters, Louisa HALE and Elizabeth HALE.

No spouse is listed with Minerva (BOWMAN) HALE in the 1850, 1860 or 1870 census. In the 1880 census, Minerva is listed as a widow; this is the only known proof that she was ever married. 
HALE, --- (I32635)
 
25198 (1) Thompson Family Research :

Virginia Hale was born in 1835 in Bledsoe, Tennessee, USA. She was born in 1835 in Tennessee, USA. She lived in District 4, Van Buren, Tennessee, United States in 1870. Virginia was buried in 1894 in Mooneyham Cemetery, Van Buren County, TN. She died in 1894 at the age of 59 in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA. She died in 1900 at the age of 65 in Van Buren, Tennessee, USA. Virginia was also known as Jennie. She was also known as Virginia Dodson. Parents: Isham Burrell Hale and Nancy B Tucker.

Spouse: Noah Dodson. Virginia Hale and Noah Dodson were married about 1855. Children were: Judah L Dodson, Nancy E Dodson, Delila Dodson, John Noah Dodson, Judy Dodson, William Dodson, Martha Dodson, Joseph N Dodson, Mary E Dodson, James Stanton Dodson, Samantha Lou Dodson, Sarah J Dodson.

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Virginia Jennie Hale Dodson
Birth: 1835
Death: Unknown

Family links: Spouse: Noah Dodson (1827 - 1897); Children: Will Dodson, Judie Dodson Keener (1880 - 1943)

Burial: Mooneyham Cemetery, Van Buren County, Tennessee, USA

Created by: Reba Bain
Record added: Apr 17, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 35969303 
HALE, Virginia (I32658)
 
25199 (1) Thompson, Neil D., "The English Ancestry of Thomasine (Clench) Frost, First Wife of Edmund Frost of Cambridge, Massachusetts," in New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. 153 (July 1999), pp. 279, 289.

(2) The maiden name of Elder Edmund FROST's first wife, Thomasine, was not BELGRAVE. [Thomasine BELGRAVE was the wife of another FROST, Edward FROST. Edward FROST and Thomasine BELGAVE were married to each other on September 26, 1585 in Glemsford, Suffolk, England; the latter marriage took place about 50 years before Elder Edmund FROST emigrated to New England.]

(3) Research notes of Roderick McLeod, an English genealogist, regarding the ancestors of Elder Edmund FROST and Thomasine CLENCH, were published in Frost on the Vine, vol. v., pp. 30-31, 50-54 (1988). [Frost on the Vine was a FROST newsletter which is no longer published.] In those research notes, Mr. McLeod concluded that the father of Thomasine CLENCH was Thomas CLENCH, yeoman, of St. Ossey [now St. Osyth], Essex County, England, whose will was dated April 6, 1634 and proved May 9, 1634.
 
CLENCH, Thomasine (I4726)
 
25200 (1) Thompson, Neil D., English Origins of the Lomax Family of Charles County, Maryland, The American Genealogist, Vol. 45 (July 1969), p. 153:

Margaret [LOMAX], bapt. 20 Oct. 1622, bur. 1 Apr. 1625. 
LOMAX, Margaret (I39917)
 

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