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101

Never married. 
CONNER, Lola Hattie (I3418)
 
102

Pioneer Days by L. R. Shropshire rev 1992 p 70. 
CONNER, William Franklin (I4889)
 
103 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3377)
 
104 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3217)
 
105

Rev. Ray Shannon officiated at funeral service. 
GROSS, Ola Permelia (I3230)
 
106

Saturday, January 30, 1999

Robert E. Foltz

Nov. 11, 1925 - Jan. 29,1999

Robert E. FOLTZ. 73, 1049 East 450 North, died at 5:30 a.m. Friday as his residence. He was born in Fort Wayne to Eugene and Susie Mae WOODCOX FOLTZ. On April 2, 1960 at Lake Bruce he married Wilma MOW, who survives. He served in the Army during World War II and was a retired general laborer.

Surviving with his wife are one daughter, Carol GRIGSBY, Walcottville, one stepdaughter, Mrs. Lyn (Carole) VEESER, Powers, Mich.: one stepson, Larry BURNETT, Argos: two grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, five step grandchildren, Clayton L. BURNETT, Fort Wayne; Brian BURNETT, Fort Wayne; Heather STUTZMAN, Rochester and Ryan [VEESER] and Christopher VEESER, Powers, Mich, and seven step greatgrandchildren.

Services will be at 1:30 p.m. Sunday at Zimmerman Family Funeral Home with the Rev. Brian SEWELL officiating. Burial will be In the Rochester Citizens Cemetery. Friends may call after 12:30 p.m. Sunday. 
FOLTZ, Robert E. (I6492)
 
107

Saturday, March 13, 1999

Bernice L. Mow Cummins

Oct 16, 1909 - March 12, 1999

Bernice L. (WALTERS) MOW CUMMINS, 89, 314 Pontiac St., died at 7;30 a.m. Friday at her home.

Born in Fulton County to Charles and Medie HOLLOWAY WALTERS. She married Herschel Bill MOW on May 9, 1936, in Rochester. He preceded her in death Sept 14, 1957. She married James W. CUMMINS on Dec 24, 1965. He died Nov 15, 1978.

She was a homemaker. She was formerly a member of Sand Hill United Methodist Church, north of Rocheter. She was a 60-year member of Rebekah Lodge No. 859, Richland Center.

Survivors include a son, Randall [MOW], Rochester; three grandchildren, Christine MOW KNEIFEL and her husband Ken, Greg MOW and Gary MOW and his wife Becky, all of Rochester; six great-grandchildren; two sisters, Edith OVERMYER and Ann WINTRODE, Rochester; two brothers, Ernest ?Bud? WALTERS and his wife Dorothy, Rochester, and Elmer WALTERS and his wife Jerry, Fort Wayne; Several nieces and nephews. She also was preceded in death by her brother, Harold WALTERS, in 1971.

Services are 1:30 p.m. Monday at Foster & Good Funeral Home, Rochester, with Rev. Junior BOSE officiating. Visitation is from 4-8 p.m. Sunday or one hour prior to service on Monday at the funeral home. Rebakah Lodge will conduct a memorial service at 7 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Burial will be in Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery northwest of Rochester. Memorials may be made to Hope Hospice. 
WALTERS, Bernice L. (I6400)
 
108

Saturday, May 17, 2003

Wilma B. Foltz

Dec. 13, 1920 ? May 15, 2003

Wilma B. FOLTZ, 82, 705 E. 4th Street, Rochester, passed away Thursday at her residence.

Born on December 13, 1920, in Richland Township to Clayton and Sarah (O?BLENIS) MOW, she married Robert E. FOLTZ on April 2, 1960, in Lake Bruce. He preceded in death on January 29, 1999.

Mrs. Foltz had worked for Kroger Grocery Store in Rochester for 27 years. She had attended the First Church of God, Rochester.

Survivors include one son, Larry and wife LaVonda BURNETT, Argos, one daughter, Carole and husband Lynn VEESER, Powers, Mich., five grandchildren, Clayton Lee and wife Shellie BURNETT, Churubusco, Brian BURNETT, Brownsburg, Christopher and Ryan VEESER, both of Powers, Mich., and Heather and husband Ryan STUTZMAN, Rochester, seven great-grandchildren, Belinda, MaKAYLA and Rebecca STUTZMAN, Rochester, Nathan BURNETT, Dothan, Alabama, and Christopher, Allen and Wesley McVICAR Churubusco, and one brother-in-law, Eldrith COOK, Rochester.

She was preceeded in death by her parents and two sisters, Ruth and Eloise COOK.
Services will be conducted at 10:30 a.m. Monday at Whippoorwill Community Church with Reverend Brian SEWELL officiating. Friends may call from 2-6 p.m. Sunday at Zimmerman Bros. Funeral Home, Rochester, and one hour prior to services at the church. Burial will be at Richland Center Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Gideons? International. 
MOW, Wilma Berneice (I6490)
 
109

Saturday, May 2, 1992

William G. Mow

April 14, 1925 - May 1, 1992

William G. ?Bill? MOW, 67, of 2105 Boulevard St., died Friday at his home. He had been in failing health for several year[s].

He was born in Marshall County to Leo C. and Esther BURKETT MOW. He was a lifetime resident of Fulton County. He was an Army veteran of World War II having served in the European Theater. He was a life member of the American Legion and a member of the VFW, Fraternal Order of Eagles and Moose Lodge, all of Rochester.

Surviving are a twin brother, Robert M. [MOW], Fort Myers, Fla.; a sister, Mrs. Roy (Helen) McGRIFF, Rochester, and nieces and nephews.

Services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at Foster & Good Funeral Home, Rochester, with the Rev. Jack HARTMAN officiating. Burial will be in the Richland Center Cemetery. Friends may call from 4-8 p.m. Sunday and after 9 a.m. Monday. The American Legion and VFW will conduct military graveside rites. Memorials may be made to the Knightstown Children?s Home c/o the American Legion or the Voice of Democracy Program c/o the VFW. 
MOW, William Grant (I6549)
 
110

Saturday, November 28, 1959

Edward Lee Mow

Edward Lee MOW, 40, died early this morning in his sleep at his home on R.R. 3, Rochester, 5?? miles northwest of the city. He had been ill for the past five years.

Born July 12, 1919, in Richland township, he was the son of Leo and Esther BURKETT MOW. He was married Jan. 14, 1938, at Koontz Lake to Margaret Alice ZUMBAUGH, who survives. Mr. Mow had spent his entire life in this community.

A member of the First Presbyterian church and the Manitou Moose lodge, he was employed at Bendix Products in South Bend from 1942-58.

Surviving, besides the wife, are two daughters; Shannon Sue [MOW], 10, and Sheridan Louise [MOW], 17, both at home; one son, Phillip Lee [MOW], a student at DePauw university; his mother, Mrs. Esther MOW, R.R. 5, Rochester; one sister, Mrs. Roy (Helen) McGRIFF, R.R. 1, Rochester; twin brothers, William [MOW], R.R. 5, Rochester, and Robert [MOW], R.R. 4, Angola, and several nieces and nephews. His father and one grandson preceded him in death, the former June 21, 1958.

Funeral services will be Monday at 2 p.m in the First Presbyterian church with the Rev. Donald DECKER, Garfield Park, Ill., officiating, assisted by the Rev. James SCHUMACHER. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends may call after 10 a.m. Sunday and until noon Monday at Foster and Good funeral home and at the church from 1-2 p.m. Monday. 
MOW, Edward Lee (I6535)
 
111

The obituary of a Pearl (GROSS) BROWN (Mrs. R. P. BROWN) appeared in the November 1, 1958 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Pearl (I3050)
 
112

The obituary of Alfred F. GROSS appeared in the April 12, 1927 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Alfred F. (I3138)
 
113

The obituary of Chester Ulus GROSS appeared in the November 3, 1970 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Chester Ulysses (I3422)
 
114

The obituary of Evalina (GROSS) DeFRIESE appears in the May 10, 1955 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Eva Lena (I3420)
 
115

The obituary of Ida (LEGG) GROSS (Mrs. C. U. GROSS) appeared in the January 7, 1965 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
LEGG, Ida Azalea (I3428)
 
116

The obituary of James Arthur GROSS appeared in the April 27, 1963 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, James Arthur (I3421)
 
117

The obituary of Lola (GROSS) ECCLES (Mrs. Virgil ECCLES) appeared in the November 8, 1964 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
GROSS, Lola (I3052)
 
118

The obituary of Mrs. A. J. GROSS appeared in the August 5, 1929 issue of the Chattanooga Times. 
ZIGLER, Harriet W. (I3047)
 
119

Thursday, April 20, 2000

O. Jane Barts

June 1,1917?April 17, 2000

O Jane BARTS, formerly of Waterhaven Apartments, Rochester, died at 8:15 pm. Monday at Metroplex Hospital, Killeen, Texas.

Born in Thompsonvllle, Mich. to Clarence and Edna BEEHLER MOW, she married Paul O. BARTS in 1937. He preceded her in death.

Mrs. Barts graduated from Richland Center High School and lived in Rochester most of her life.

Survivors include one son, Phillip and wife Linda BARTS, Killeen; two grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren.

No services are scheduled at this time. Internment will be in Richland Center Cemetery.

Monday, July 3, 2000

O. Jane Barts

June 1, 1917 - April 17, 2000

Othelia Jane BARTS, 82, Killeen, Texas, formerly of Rochester, died at Metroplex Hospital, Killeen.

Born in Thompsonville, Mich., to Clarence and Edna BEEHLER MOW, she married Paul O. BARTS on Feb. 27, 1937 in Logansport. He died on May 20, 1962.

Mrs. Barts retired from the Woodlawn Hospital Admissions Department in 1980. She was a member of Trinity United Methodist Church, Rochester, and belonged to the senior citizens group of Waterhaven Apartments. A graduate of Richland Center High School, she lived in Rochester for 34 years before moving to Killeen in 1996.

Survivors include one son, Philip and wife Linda BARTS, Killeen; two granddaughters, Lisa M. SNYDER and Michelle L. MANKINS, both of Killeen; two great-granddaughters, Mykel SNYDER and Chynna MANKINS, and one great-grandson, J.J. MANKINS, all of Killeen; two sisters-in-law, Mary Jo MOW, Elkhart and Mildred BARTS, Rochester.

She was preceded in death by her parants.

Graveside services are at 10 a.m. Thursday at Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery. Foster & Good Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. 
MOW, Othelia Jane (I6413)
 
120

Thursday, February 25, 1993

Roy McGriff

March 25, 1919 - Feb. 24, 1993

Roy McGRIFF, 73, of 1401 Washington St., died at 8:57 p.m. Wednesday at Naples Community Hospital, Naples, Fla., where he had been a patient since Feb. 20.

He was born near Argos to Albert and Ethel NEWCOMB McGRIFF. On Oct. 30, 1945 in Rochester he married Helen MOW, who survives. He was employed for 32?? years at GenCorp. formerly General Tire, Wabash. He was a [veteran of the Army Air Force, serving during World War II in Iceland.]

[Surviving with his wife are a grandson, Randy [McGRIFF], of Torrence, Calif.; three sisters, Leone ABBOTT, Rochester; Mrs. Charles (Mildred) GOHEEN, Argos, and Mrs. Everett (Florence) GIBBONS, Plymouth. Preceding in death was a son, John [McGRIFF]; a brother, Orville [McGRIFF], and a twin brother, Ray [McGRIFF].]

Services will be at 10 a.m. Monday a Foster & Good Funeral Home, Rochester, with the Rev. Jack HARTMAN officiating. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Sunday. Memorials may be made to Friends of the Library. 
McGRIFF, Roy (I6547)
 
121

Thursday, May 4, 1972

Eva Mow

Mrs. Eva MOW, 73, 416 West Fifth street, died unexpectedly at 2 p.m. Wednesday at her residence.

Born Dec. 29, 1898, in Kokomo, she was the daughter of John and Mary HARLAN JACKSON. Her first marriage was March 13, 1925, in Harlan, Mich., to Byron MYERS. He died in 1961. Her second marriage was July 20, 1968 in Traverse City, Mich. to C. D. MOW. He preceded in death March 11, 1972. She had resided here since 1968, moving from Traverse City, Mich. She was a member of the Argos Congregational Christian church.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Richard (Marion) MINGUS, Empire, Mich.; two sons,
Harvey MYERS, Middleton, Wis., Lawrence MYERS, Williamson, Mich.; nine grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Lena BROOKER, Kokomo, Mrs. Grace WAGNER, Harlan, Mich.; two brothers, Russell JACKSON, Frankfort, Mich., and Earl JACKSON, Pontiac, Mich.; two stepgrandchildren.

Memorial services will be conducted at 8 p.m. today in the Foster & Good funeral home. The Rev. Jacob WAECHTER will officiate. The body will be removed Friday to the King funeral home in Mesick, Mich., where friends may call after 6 p.m. Friday. Final rites will be conducted at 2 p.m. Saturday in the United Methodist church there. Burial will be in the Sherman-Mesick Memorial Park cemetery. 
JACKSON, Eva (I6527)
 
122

Thursday, November 16, 1978

James W. Cummins

Mr. James W. CUMMINS, 62, 314 Pontiac street, died at 4:49 p.m. Wednesday of an
apparent heart attack.

He was born March 10, 1916 in Hume, Ill., to William E. and Katherine McDONOUGH CUMMINS. He had lived in Rochester since 1957, moving from Fishers, Ind. He was married Dec. 24, 1965, in Rochester to Bernice WALTERS MOW, who survives. Mr. Cummins was a retired Norfolk and Western agent, and was a musician leading the Jim Cummins band. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge, Fishers; the Elks; the Manitou Moose Lodge; the Scottish Rite Lodge of South Bend and the South Bend Federation of Musicians.

Surviving with the wife are a daughter, Mrs. Norman (Shirley) DURBIN, St. Elmo, Ill.; a son, William R. CUMMINS, Kewanna; a step-son, Randy MOW, R.R. 5, Rochester; thirteen grandchildren; a sister, Marie HOOKANA, Oceanside, Cal.

Services are tentatively set for 1:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Foster & Good funeral home, with the Rev. Donald MAUGHAN officiating. Burial will be in the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester. Friends may call from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and until time of service Saturday. 
CUMMINS, James W. (I13131)
 
123

Tuesday, August 23, 1977

Charles R. Mow

Charles Richard MOW, 57, Mishawaka, died Monday morning at his home.

Mr. Mow was born Feb. 23, 1920 to Walter and Agnes COOPER MOW at Richland Center. He married Marjorie HUNT in 1941; she survives.

Surviving with the wife are two sons, John [MOW], Sarasota, Fla., and Arthur [MOW], Mishawaka; three grandchildren; a brother, and a sister.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the Albright United Methodist church, Mishawaka. Friends may call at the Dallards funeral home, Mishawaka, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. today. 
MOW, Charles Richard (I6789)
 
124

Tuesday, February 20, 1990

Helen Irene Whitledge

Helen Irene WHITLEDGE, 87, Madisonville, Ky., died at 3:05 p.m. Sunday at the Regional Medical Center, Madisonville.

She was born on Feb. 4, 1903 in Richland Center to Charlie and Clara HARPSTER MOW. She was a retired grocery merchant.

Surviving are nieces and nephews, including Nancy GIBBONS, Rochester. Her husband, Tony WHITLEDGE, died Dec. 11, 1980.

Graveside services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Shady Grove Cemetery, Poole, Ky. There will be no visitation. Barnett-Strother Funeral Home, Madisonville, is in charge of arrangements. 
MOW, Helen Irene (I6326)
 
125

Tuesday, July 13, 1954

Samuel V. [?] Mow

Samuel V. [?] MOW, 56, former resident of Fulton county, died at 12:30 a.m. today at his residence in North Manchester. He had been in ill health for five years. He was born April 14, 1898, near Rochester to Charles and Clara (HARPSTER) MOW. He was a member of the North Manchester Presbyterian church. Mr. Mow was a retired school teacher. His wife, the former Stella WISEMAN, to whom he was married on Sept. 13, 1924, survives.

Other survivors are two daughters, Mrs. Richard REAHARD and Miss Myra Lynn MOW, both of North Manchester; one son, Thomas Allen [MOW], at home; two brothers and three sistes and two grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at the Bender funeral home, North Manchester. Dr. Orrin MANSFIELD will officiate and burial will be in the Union cemetery at Pierceton. Friends may call at the funeral home. 
MOW, Samuel Dewey (I6768)
 
126

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Grethel Mow

Mrs. Grethel MOW, 73, R.R. 5, Rochester, died at 9 a.m. today at Woodlawn hospital where she had been a patient since Friday. She had been in declining health for 18?? years.

Mrs. Mow was born Aug. 9, 1893 in Richland township to William and Arsada BECK ROGERS. She had lived all her life in Richland township or the Argos community except for five years when she lived in Manistee county, Mich. She married C. Dean MOW, who survives, on Aug. 27, 1913. She was a member of the Congregational Christian church of Argos and a past member of the What Not club of Richland township.

In addition to her husband she is survived by two grandchildren, Mrs. James (Annette) WYSONG, Plymouth, and Leland COX, a student at Purdue university, and two sisters, Mrs. Ollie TOWNE, Rochester, and Mrs. Otis (Ethel) NELLANS, R.R. 3, Argos. A daughter, Mrs. Robert (Evelyn) COX died July 5, 1966. A son died in infancy. She was also preceded in death by three sisters.

Funeral services will be at the Congregational Christian church, Argos at 2 p.m. Thursday. The Rev. Ernest TREBER, the Rev. Jacob WAECHTER and the Rev. Russell GOOD, will officiate. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends may call at Foster & Good funeral home after 2 p.m. Wednesday up to 11 a.m. Thursday and at the church one hour before services. 
ROGERS, Grethel R. (I6701)
 
127

Was on the Hamilton County, TN School Board. Lived in Chattanooga, TN in April 1998. 
GROSS, Wylie Watson Jr. (I3470)
 
128

Wednesday, December 17, 1980

Dennis W. Mow

Dennis William MOW, 25, Rt. 2, Angola, died at his residence Friday evening of carbon monoxide poisoning. Death is attributed to be accidental.

Mr. Mow was born May 8, 1955 in Rochester to Virginia GOSS MOW, Angola, and Robert MOW, Fort Myers, Fla. He had lived most of his life in the Angola area. He was a carpenter.

Surviving with the parents are two brothers, Wayne and Kirk [MOW], both of Angola, and several aunts and uncles.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Klinks funeral Home, Angola. Graveside services will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday at the Rochester I.O.O.F. Cemetery with the Rev. David HEYWARD officiating. Foster & Good Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements. 
MOW, Dennis William (I6553)
 
129

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

Evelyn Cox

Mrs. Evelyn COX, 51, R.R. 1, Argos, a teacher at Riddle school, died at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in St. Joseph hospital in South Bend. Death was unexpected, although she had been ill one week.

Born in Manistee county, Mich., Aug. 23, 1915, she was the daughter of C. Dean and
Grethel ROGERS MOW, R.R. 5, Rochester, who survive. Mrs. Cox was married to Charles Robert COX, April 30, 1938 in Michigan City. She was the secretary of the Rochester Classroom Teachers association and a member of the Argos Methodist church.

Surviving with the parents and the husband are a daughter, Mrs. James (Annette) WYSONG, Plymouth and one son, Leland [COX], at home. A brother preceded in death.

Services will be in the Grossman funeral home at Argos Friday at 2 p.m. with Rev. Douglas STANWYCK officiating. Burial will be in the New Oak Hill cemetery at Plymouth. Friends may call after 10 a.m. Thursday at the funeral home. 
MOW, Evelyn Arsada (I6529)
 
130

Wednesday, October 1, 1941

Albert Leon BUNN, 63, died Tuesday afternoon at 12:15 o?clock at his home, 425 West Fourth street, this city, following an illness of several years? duration. Mr. Bunn had a host of friends throughout Fulton and Marshall counties.

The deceased, a retired Richland township farmer, was born August 27, 1878, the son of Francis Marion and Susan Catherine BABCOCK BUNN. He resided in Richland township his entire life until three years ago, when he moved to this city.

On March 21, 1903, he was united in marriage to Myrtle Mae COLE, who died June 24, 1922. His second marriage to Edna MOW, who survives, was solemnized on February 27th, 1926.

Mr. Bunn was a member of the Richland Center, Methodist church and Odd Fellows? Lodge and the Rochester Encampment.

Surviving are the widow; two daughters, Mrs. Frances HENDRICKSON, Indianapolis; Mrs. Dortha McMURRAY, Rochester; one son, Ralph [BUNN], Richland Center; three stepchildren, Herschel MOW and Mrs. Paul BARTS, both of Rochester; Charles MOW, Camp Lee, Va.; two sisters, Mrs. Perry LOWMAN, South Bend; Mrs. Clyde LOUGH, Rochester; one brother, A. E. BUNN, Leiters Ford; a half-brother, Floyd BABCOCK, Richland Center; and seven grandchildren.

Last rites will be conducted from the Richland Center Methodist church, Thursday afternoon at two o?clock. Burial is to be made in the Richland Center cemetery. The body was returned to the home this morning, where friends may call to pay their respects. 
BUNN, Albert Leon (I13105)
 
131
"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. II, pp. 138-145 (1913):

1710. . . .
Oct. 25. . . .
Louw, Albert and wife?Louwerens. Witnesses: Michiel Van Vechten and wife.

1714. . . .
Oct. 9.
Louw, Jan and wife?Gysbert. Witnesses: Albert Louw; Mertien Beeckmas.

1716. . . .
Oct. 17. . . .
Lou, Jan and wife?Bengemin. Witnesses: Adriaen Muelenaer and wife.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. II, pp. 209-218 (1913):

1719. . . .
Apr. 4. . . .
Lou, Jan and wife, Jannitie?Marytie. Witnesses: Cornelis Lou and wife, Juedie.

1719. . . .
Oct. 13. . . .
Lou, Albert and wife?Abram; also Cornelis. Witnesses: Abram Lameter and wife; Cornelis Lou and wife.

1719. . . .
Oct. 13. . . .
Lou, Cornelis and wife?Dirck. Witnesses: Pieter and Cattalyna Middag.

1730. . . .
Oct. 25.
Louw, Cornelis and Judick?Judick. Witnesses: Dirck Middag; Maertie de Mot.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. III, pp. 56-60 (1914):

1752 [?] . . .
July 26. . . .
Loue(?), Coerneles and Catrina?Sara. Witnesses: Deneyes and Sara Vaen Dueyn.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 52-56 (1915):

1780. . . .
Dec. 10.
Low, Peter and Hanna?Cornelius.

1785. . . .
July 10.
Louw, Dirck and Dorothea Ten Eyck?Rebechka.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 145-148 (1915):

1788. . . .
June 29.
Derick Low and Doryty Tennick?Nelly.

1788. . . .
Sept. 21. . . .
Peter Low and Hanna Tenick?Andres Tenick.

* * *

"First Reformed Church, Raritan (Somerville) Baptisms," Somerset County Historical Quarterly, Vol. IV, pp. 226-230 (1915):

1792. . . .
May 11.
Low, Derick and Dority Ten Eyck?Anne Van Derveer.

1792. . . .
Aug. 8.
Low, Hannah Ten Eyck (wife of Peter)?Rebechah. 
LOW, Test II (I11858)
 
132 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6859)
 
133
((1) Elizabeth Ann Grubb:

REFERENCE:

1. Wilma MOW FOLTZ, 1049 E-450N, Rochester, IN 46975 
FECHNER, Mona Pearl (I6864)
 
134 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6906)
 
135
((1) Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. 2 [database online], Orem, UT: Ancestry.com, 1998:

Taylor

1700, 9, 29. Thomas prcf [produced a certificate from] Chester MM [Monthly Meeting], dated 1700, 8, 28, to m [marry] Rachel Minshall

1700, 10, 27. Thomas ltm [liberated to marry] Rachel Minshall [Rachel Mincher in women's minutes] 
Family F4610
 
136
((1) There can be no assurance that this Richard FROST was a child of John FROST and Ann HERRIT; he is shown here to stimulate further research. This Richard FROST is is listed here as a child of John FROST and Ann HERRIT because he is shown in the International Genealogical Index to have had parents named John FROST and Ann [maiden name unknown], and to have been born in Alton, Hampshire, England after January 27, 1742, when John FROST and Ann HERRIT were married to each other in Alton.

(2) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index ®, Copyright © 1980, 2002, data as of May 3, 2007, Batch No.: J146621, Dates: 1615 - 1812, Source Call No.: 1041296, Type: Film, Printout Call No.: NONE, Type: Film, Sheet: 00

RICHARD FROAST
Male

Event(s):
Christening: OCT 1746 Alton, Hampshire, England

Parents:
Father: JOHN FROAST
Mother: ANN 
FROST, Richard (I15045)
 
137
(1)

LINDLEY, JACOB WEST, NANCY E 02/18/1851 A/ 175 BOND 
Family F6368
 
138
(1)

Monday, April 2, 1934

Mrs. Martha STAUFFER, aged 78, a resident of the Walnut neighborhood for many years, died yesterday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Tena KINDIG, 130 North Jefferson street after an illness dating from October 19, 1931 when she suffered a stroke of paralysis.

Mrs. Stauffer, whose maiden name was McGRAW, was born on a farm near Walnut. She lived in that vicinity all of her lifetime until she came to this city to make her home with her daughter.

The deceased was married twice and had two children by each marriage. In April 1875, the deceased was married to John ALDERFER who died December 4, 1879. On June 21, 1885, she was married to W. H. STAUFFER who survives. Mrs. Stauffer was a member of the Methodist Church at Walnut.

Survivors are the husband, two sons, Charles ALDERFER, Crane, Tex., and C. G. STAUFFER, of South Bend; two daughters, Mrs. Clayton FLETCHER of near Argos and Mrs. KINDIG of this city, ten grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

The funeral services will be held from the Richland Center church at 2 o?clock Wednesday afternoon with the Rev. Albert VERMILLION of Montezuma in charge. Burial will be made in the cemetery at Richland Center. 
McGRAW, Martha (I13123)
 
139
(1)

Monday, April 24, 1933

Elihu FLETCHER, aged 84, died Sunday at 7 a.m. at the home of his son Claude FLETCHER two miles southeast of Argos after a several months illness due to complications. He was born in Rush county on October 18, 1848. His parents were William and Mary FLETCHER. For 63 years or until last fall he lived on a farm near Richland Center. His wife, who was Marie REYNOLDS, preceded him in death. Rusvivors [sic] are three sons, Claude [FLETCHER], Dallas [FLETCHER] and Clayton [FLETCHER], all of whom reside on farms near Argos; a brother Martin FLETCHER of this city and a sister, Mary Ann WYNN of Detroit, Mich. The funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday from the Walnut M. P. Church with Rev. A. L. WOOTEN in charge. Burial will be made in the cemetery at Richland Center.

(2) Tombaugh, Jean C. & Wendell C., Fulton County Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions, Rochester, IN: 1993:

Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery:

FLETCHER

(1) Mariah J., 1850-1910
(2) Wm. Elihu, 1848-1933 
FLETCHER, William Elihu (I13164)
 
140
(1)

Monday, June 8, 1964

Claude D. Fletcher

Funeral services will be at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Grossman funeral home at Argos for Claude D. FLETCHER, 80, R.R. 2, Argos, who died at 12:30 p.m. Sunday in the Klapp nursing home in Argos. The Rev. Arthur A. SCHENCK will officiate and burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery.

Born Oct. 10, 1883 in Fulton county, he was the son of William and Mariah RUNNELS FLETCHER. He was married Oct. 4, 1905 to Barbara WYNN, who died April 16, 1945. His second marriage was March 30, 1946 to Mattie REED, who survives.

Mr. Fletcher, a retired farmer, had lived in Marshall county for the past 50 years. He was a member of the Argos Methodist church and was a former trustee of Walnut township.

Surviving with the wife are two sons, Elmer and Floyd [FLETCHER], both of Argos; two step-daughters, Mrs. Francis (Margaret) LaTURNER and Mrs. Walter (Ann) HARLEY, both [of] Argos; a step-son, Richard REED, Park Ridge, Ill.; seven step-grandchildren, and three step-great-grandchildren. He was the last of eight children.

Friends may call at the funeral home.

(2) Tombaugh, Jean C. & Wendell C., Fulton County Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions, Rochester, IN: 1993:

Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery:

FLETCHER

(1) Barbara E., 1882-1945
(2) Claud D., 1883-1964 
FLETCHER, Claude D. (I13167)
 
141
(1)

Name: HOLZEMER, KATHERINE
Social Security #: 0
Sex: FEMALE
Birth Date: 11 Dec 1884
Birthplace: ILLINOIS
Death Date: 11 Jul 1954
Death Place: LOS ANGELES
Mother's Maiden Name: POWERS
Father's Surname: SHANNON 
SHANNON, Katherine (I7821)
 
142
(1)

Saturday, September 27, 1958

Dallas Fletcher

Dallas W. FLETCHER, 84, died at 7 p.m. Friday at Argos after a year?s illness. He had resided with his daughters since the death of his wife two years ago.

Born Jan. 12, 1874, in Walnut township, Marshall county, he was the son of William and Maria RUNNELLS FLETCHER. He was married Nov. 10, 1895, to Ina May COPLEN, who died Jan. 1, 1956.

A retired farmer, Mr. Fletcher had lived several years in Fulton county. He was the oldest member of the Walnut Gospel church at the time of his death.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Leo (Gertrude) ALDERFER, R.R. 1, Argos, and Mrs.Onan (Opal) LAUGHMAN, R.R. 4, Columbia City; six grandchildren; eleven great-grandchildren; one brother, Claude [FLETCHER], R.R. 1, Argos. One son, Lloyd [FLETCHER], died in 1937.

Funeral services will be Monday at 2 p.m. DST at the Walnut Gospel church with the Rev. Roman MILLER, assisted by Wayne SPEICHER, officiating. Burial will be in the Richland Center I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends may call after 7 p.m. today until 10 a.m. Sunday at the Grossman funeral home in Argos. The body will be removed to the home of Mrs. Leo ALDERFER and then taken to the church an hour before the services.

(2) Tombaugh, Jean C. & Wendell C., Fulton County Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions, Rochester, IN: 1993:

Richland Center I.O.O.F. Cemetery:

FLETCHER

(1) Iva Mae, 1879-1956
(2) Dallas W., 1874-1958 
FLETCHER, Dallas W. (I13166)
 
143
(1)

Thursday, October 9, 1952

Henry Stauffer

Final rites for Henry STAUFFER, 95, who passed away Wednesday morning at the home of his son Neal STAUFFER of South Bend, will be held 2 p.m. Friday at the Richland Center church. Burial will be in an adjacent cemetery.

Mr. Stauffer was a former resident of Walnut, where he was engaged in the carpet and
rug weaving business for many years.

Besides the son, he is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Tenia KINDIG, New Carlisle, nine
grandchildren, twenty-one great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. 
STAUFFER, W. Henry (I13162)
 
144
(1)

Wednesday, September 11, 1940

Funeral services were held in Keokuk, Iowa, Sunday for Charles L. ALDERFER, aged 65, who died at his home in Keokuk last Thursday from a sudden heart attack. He had been in failing health for two years.

Mr. Alderfer was born at Walnut July 30, 1875, and for a number of years lived in the Walnut and Tiosa neighborhoods. For many years he traveled with the Hagenbeck-Wallace circus as a trapeze artist and then had his own wagon circus which was billed under the title of ?ALDERFER?S GREAT DOG AND PONY SHOW.?

Mr. Alderfer was married in 1892 to Miss Emma KEISTER. He was a member of the M[e]thodist church and Masonic fraternity at Gilead. Mr. Alderfer maintained winter quarters for his circus in Gilead for five years.

Surviving are his widow; a son, Leroy ALDERFER, of Crane, Texas; a daughter, Mrs. Ralph CHRISTY, of Keokuk; two grandchildren; a brother, C. O. STAUFFER, of South Bend; two sisters, Mrs. Clayton FLETCHER of Argos and Mrs. Tenia KINDIG of Mishawaka and stepfather, W. H. STAUFFER of South Bend. 
ALDERFER, Charles L. (I13163)
 
145
(1) A household headed by Moses LYNCH is listed in the 1860 census of Lone Oak Township, Bates County, MO.

Moses is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer who was then 25 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1835. According to the 1860 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Judah, who was then 23 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1860 census, she was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Sarah, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, she was born in about 1858. According to the 1860 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is Henry FROST, who was then 6 years of age; therefore, according to the 1860 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1860 census, she was born in IA. The relationship between Moses LYNCH and Henry FROST is not listed in the 1860 census.

(2) A household headed by Moses LINCH is listed in the 1870 census of Independence Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses is listed in the 1870 census as a farmer who was then 36 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1834. According to the 1870 census, he was born in OH.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Juda, who was then 33 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1870 census, she was born in WV.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Sarah E., who was then 11 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1859. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Grace A., who was then 8 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1862. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Olive E., who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1867. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Laura D.,, who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1868. According to the 1870 census, she was born in MO.

(3) A household headed by Moses LYNCH is listed in the 1880 census of Independence Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses is listed in the 1880 census as farmer who was then 45 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1835. According to the 1880 census, he was born in IN, and both of his parents were born in VA.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Julia, who was then 43 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1837. According to the 1880 census, she was born in IN, and both of her parents were born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, S. Ella, who was then 21 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1859. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in IN, and her mother was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Grace A., who was then 18 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1862. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in IN, and her mother was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter, Ollie, who was then 13 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1867. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, her father was born in IN, and her mother was born in VA.

Also listed with Moses is his son, Elmer, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1867. According to the 1880 census, he was born in IA, his father was born in IN, and his mother was born in VA.

(4) A household headed by Moses LINCH is listed in the 1900 census of Independence Township, Appanoose County, IA.

Moses Linch is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer who was born in March 1835 and was then 65 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in KY, his father was born in VA, and his mother was born in MD. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married 42 years.

Listed with Moses is his wife, Judith, who was born in September 1837 and was then 62 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in VA, and both of her parents were born in VA. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married 42 years and had theretofore given birth to 9 children, 3 of whom were then living.

Also listed with Moses is his son, Elmer E., a farm laborer who was born in July 1870 and was then 29 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in IA, his father was born in KY, and his mother was born in VA. According to the 1900 census, he had then been married less than 1 year.

Also listed with Moses is his daughter-in-law, Elma, who was born in June 1883 and was then 17 years of age. According to the 1900 census, she was born in MO, and both of her parents were born in MO. According to the 1900 census, she had then been married less than 1 year and had theretofore given birth to no children.

Also listed with Moses is Brandon HARVEY, a farm laborer who was born in June 1877 and was then 22 years of age. According to the 1900 census, he was born in MO, and both of his parents were born in MO.

(5) Virginia Smith has provided to the compiler a copy of a warranty deed dated May 2, 1900 from Moses LINCH and Juda LINCH, husband and wife, to John L. SCIFERS, covering a 10-acre tract of land in Appanoose County, IA. The tract of land, which is located in Section 26, Township 70 North, Range 19 West, was conveyed for the consideration of $275. 
LINCH, Moses (I969)
 
146 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3549)
 
147
(1) Crow Family

Esther was born in 1785 in Wheeling Creek, Greene County, Pennsylvania, in the extreme southwest corner of the state. She was the daughter of Jacob and Susan Secris(t) Crow. Jacob Crow (Gro) was born in Germany or Holland about 1732 and left Germany as a young man leaving his mother and two sisters who were all the family, behind. After arriving in Philadelphia about 1750 without any money, he was sold for a sufficient time to pay for his passage. After his time was finished, he married Susannah Seacress (Secrist) about 1860.

Susannah Secrist was born about 1735, and was also an indentured servant. The family name Siegrist occurs in variant spellings in the German language, as follows: Siecrist, Siegrist Siegerist, Sigeris, Sigeris, Siegeriss, Sigerist, Sigriz. The German word Sigrist is a provincial term and it is still current in the South or Southwest of Germany, in the Alemannic linguistic area. This is the area from which came most of the ancestors of the present day Pennsylvania Germans (sometimes erroneously called Pennsylvania Dutch).

After they were married, Jacob and Susannah Crow purchased a 362 acre farm near the Great Crossings on Youghiogeny River, in West Moreland County, in the southwest corner of Pennsylvania. The farm was located in a mountainous area, and is now mostly under water as a dam was later built for flood protection. A blockhouse was built on their property for protection from Indians. Here the family resided for many years, until some of the children were in their teens. There they raised eleven children, five sons and six daughters: Frederick, Martin, Peter, John, Michael, Susan, Elizabeth, Tena, Catherine, Esther and Mary. The family then began looking for a home further west. In 1769, they traded a team of oxen and wagon for a tract of land of about 450 acres, situated on the south branch of Wheeling creek, later to be known as Crow Creek or Crow Mills, in Greene County, Pennsylvania. It is located in the extreme southwest corner of Pennsylvania, about one-half mile from the border with West Virginia. Their new home was a log cabin. Near the home site were two mounds and an earthen circle, built supposedly by the Indians. Jacob Crow served as a private in the Virginia Militia during the Revolutionary War, serving in the Company of Capt. Daniel Smith (1776).

Jacob and Susannah moved to their new home in the wilderness when Michael was but a few weeks old. The first night in their cabin was not one of peaceful slumber. Roving bands of Indians were on all sides. Fearing an attack by the savages, the family fled into the woods. The mother had the small baby, Michael, and became separateds from the rest of the family. Fearing to call out, and also that the child might cry, she walked nearly all night, not knowing where, but was pleased, when daylight came, to find herself in sight of home.

When Michael was seven years old there was an alarm circulated that Indians were around, and all fled to the block house at Lindley's, Washington county, Penn. Two men living alone on what is now known as the Harsh farm, not getting word soon enough, were killed. After all were at the fort, a number of men departed to see about the men they feared had been killed. John Crow was one of the number, and for some reason brought Michael with them to the Farley farm, now owned by Thomas Steele. There they left him, John promising to come back that night. Fearing to stay at the house, he crossed the creek and stayed under a cliff of rocks. At evening he came to the house and got something to eat. Fearing both Indians and wolves, he raised a "puncheon" in the floor and arranged so that if Indians came he could crawl down and out under the house. If wolves came, he could go in the house and shut the hole. He was left there till the evening of the third day, when the men came back. The men at Harsh place were found dead and were buried. The head of one was gone, and was afterward found by some of Jacob Crow's sons while hauling wood. After the block house was built at the Crow farm, word was given that the Indians were about. When they gathered at the fort in the evening, it turned out that Whartons, who lived where Majorsville now is, had not been apprised of the danger, and no one seemed willing to go. Michael, then perhaps fifteen years old, said he would go. After the warning had been given he was returning across the hill, following a footpath through the woods, something attracted his attention. The moon was just rising, he stooped for a better view, and saw Indians crouched in the path. He turned quickly aside and jumped behind a tree. A large dog come after him and he ran to another tree, at the same time striking at the dog to keep him off. He then took a more circuitous route and got home in safety. The following morning, two boys went to catch horses which were running in the woods. The Indians captured them, and took them nearly to Moundsville and tied to a tree. The Indians went elsewhere, and while left alone, the the boys made their escape.

The family soon planted apple seeds and sprouts brought with them over the mountains in pack saddles. While the settlers were tending their crops, they kept part of the men out as lookouts to watch for the Indians. They opened sugar camps, cleared ground for corn, built corrals for their sheep, erected a blockhouse or fort near the cabin, and hunted for game. The latter included bear, deer, wildcats, panthers, wolves, otters, wild hogs, ducks, and turkeys. German was spoken by the family, and the children learned to speak English in later years. Fear of the Indians was never absent from the thoughts of the family in the backwoods.

The bottoms along Crow Creek were covered with maple trees, and the making of maple sugar in the spring was an important part of the life of this pioneer family. Sometimes 100 pounds or more of maple sugar would be stored under the ledges of the rocks at the lower end of the bottoms. It was during one of these sugar making times that the boys; John, Martin, and some of the smaller boys were one night engaged in boiling down the sugar water in the big bottom across the creek. Intending to work all night, they had brought meat to cook over the fire. The younger lads had grown sleepy as they sat watching the blazing fires, and had been put to bed in a hogshead turned upside down.

Suddenly the dogs bristled up, and ran out into the darkness, barking fiercely. Believing that the Indians were lurking nearby, the boys threw sugar water on the blaze to extinguish it. They awakened the sleeping boys, and together they went to the top of the hill on the opposite side of the creek. There they spent the rest of the night on a bed of leaves behind a log. They had taken their meat with them. and being afraid to light a fire, ate the meat raw. This time, however, the Indians did not appear.

When the elder boys of the Crow family grew into manhood, they were very fond of hunting. In the Spring of 1782, John, Martin, and Frederick Crow set forth on one of their frequent hunting trips. They were accompanied by two men from Fort Henry (now Wheeling). The expedition carried them down the river to the mouth of Big Fishing Creek, which empties into the Ohio River at New Martinsville. They had been informed that elk hunting was especially good in that region. Up that stream a few miles, at the site of the present town of Reader on the mouth of a branch creek, they established their camp. This stream has retained the name of Crow Run because of the events that occurred there over two centuries ago.

On the evening of the second day, as Frederick and Martin, who had been out in search of game during the day, were returning to camp and had nearly reached it, they were suddenly attacked by Indians and fired upon from the rear of the camp, which was built after the fashion of the old style sugar house. Frederick was shot in the left breast, the ball passing through his arm and severing the artery near the shoulder. At the same time Martin had a portion of one of his ears shot away. Frederick, seriously wounded and bleeding profusely, had started to run, being closely pursued by the Indians. He ran a distance of some three or four hundred yards when, looking back, he found that his pursuers were rapidly gaining upon him. Without hesitation, for he had no time to deliberate, he plunged into the waters of the creek, which were about waist deep, and waded across to the opposite bank. Instead of following him through the creek at once, they paused for a moment on the brink of the bank near the spot where he had entered the waters. On reaching the opposite bank he looked back to see whether they were following him, when one of the Indians hurled his tomahawk at him, which, fortunately, missed him, although it came in unpleasant proximity to his head. Their guns having been emptied at the time of the attack, they had had no opportunity to re-load. During their brief pause, however, one of his pursuers had reloaded his gun. They promptly re-commenced their pursuit, following him up the stream, the side of which he closely hugged, to a long point extending out from the south side of the creek, with which they were familiar, and where they expected to succeed in cutting him off, and effecting his capture. This, however, proved to be unsuccessful.

As the wounded man ran, he placed the leaves of the sassafras, which grew in abundance in the neighborhood, with which he filled his mouth, and chewed them into a mucilage and pressed them into his wound, thereby staunching the flow of blood, the free loss of which was beginning to enfeeble and exhaust him. Upon turning again to look back upon his pursuers he discovered an Indian with his gun to his shoulder taking aim and in the act of firing at him, but he eluded the bullet by quickly throwing himself upon the ground, and the shot passed over him. Jumping to his feet he gathered up his rifle. Realizing that it was a race for life he bent all his energies to the occasion. In the rapidly gathering darkness which was settling down upon the scene, he succeeded in eluding his pursuers and making good his escape.

Frederick and his companions, at their first setting out, had agreed upon certain signals to be used by them in case of emergency - such as the hooting of an owl or the howling of a wolf, by means of which in no long time the discovered the whereabouts of each other, and in company made their return to their homes, with the exception of John. It is supposed that this latter person, being absent at the time of the attack, on hearing the firing at once hastened back to the camp to render assistance if needed, and in so doing became a target for the Indians, as it was afterward found that five musket balls had entered his breast, which were so close together that they could be covered with the palm of a hand. He must have been instantly killed.

Martin remained in hiding quite a while. He felt that the stillness was foreboding. After some time had elapsed, he heard some more shots echoing across the valley in the direction of the camp. These were the shots that killed John Crow. After a second prolonged stillness that seemed to indicate that the Indians had departed, Martin ventured to imitate the sound of an owl as a signal to his companions, if by chance they were living. After two or three attempts, he was rewarded. Frederick, who was not far distant, gave an answering hoot. Hardly able to believe his ears, he signaled again, and so the two brothers got together. Their other two companions seemed to have escaped unharmed. The body of John Crow was found by his brothers at the side of the creek, near the camp, with his head partly submerged in the water. His breast had been pierced by five bullets, his throat slashed, and his scalp removed. They picked him up and placed him in a hollow sycamore tree, covering the body to protect it from the wolves, until they could return and give the remains a proper burial.

Hastening to Fort Henry, they returned with reinforcements to the scene of the tragedy. Only four days had elapsed. Wrapping the body in a blanket, it was interred beneath the sycamore tree, using walnut slabs for a coffin. The following inscription was carved on the tree:

J. J. CROW
1772

This living marker stood until 1875, when it was blown down.

In the small family grave lot on the old Crow homestead in Greene County, Pennsylvania, are crude stone markers bearing the date, 1791, and the initials: L. C., S. C., and K. C. They mark the graves of the three daughters of Jacob and Susannah Crow: Lisbeth, Susan, and Katherine, killed by Indians just across the creek, not far from the site of the old Crow home. This occurred on Sunday morning, May 1, 1791. The three girls, accompanied by their sister, Christina, were going to see an old couple that were nearby neighbors of the Crow family. They had stopped to play with a snake in a ripple of the creek, just below what is now known as Indian Rock. Their youngest brother, Michael, who had been after a stray horse up Crab Tree, came along on horseback going home. He stopped a moment to talk, and asked Christina if she didn't want to get up behind him and ride back home. She said she would rather go on with the girls. He then galloped down the creek, noticing that his horse snorted and pranced about uneasily. The horse had scented the Indians, who were hiding behind the rock, now bearing a historical inscription of the incident being related. No sooner had Michael ridden out of sight, then the Indians revealed themselves.

There were two Indians and one white renegade named Spicer in the party. They brandished their tomahawks to warn the girls to keep silent, and advanced to capture them. They led the girls up the creek to a little flat. One of the older girls said to Christina, the youngest: Pray to God to prepare us for what is before us." The Indians sat down on a log and asked them questions about the fort, etc. in the vicinity; Spicer doing all the talking for the Indians. One of the Indians who was seated between two of the youngest of the females held a tight grasp on the wrist of each. From their significant gestures and looks, and the conversation carried on between the three in the Indian tongue it was evident that they were discussing the disposition which they should make of their prisoners. The girls realized from what they saw and could understand that no mercy was to be extended to them; but that their death was determined upon, and that their fate was imminent. Then they prepared to kill the girls. Grasping the victims clasped hands with one of their own, each Indian proceeded to tomahawk a girl. When Spicer, who had to hold two girls, struck the larger, Christina jerked her hands loose and started to run.

Christina, the youngest, a bright and sprightly girl, had formed a resolution in her mind that, as death was to be her doom, she would, at the first propitious moment which presented itself, make a break for liberty. Hence, while her captors were engaged in the heat of the discussion and the vigilance of the Indian who held her wrist was somewhat relaxed, with a sudden effort she withdrew it from his grasp by a dexterous twist of her arm and springing to her feet darted away, but she had not taken but a step or two when she received a blow on her back with the butt end of the gun which, with his freed hand, he had snatched from the ground where it lay beside him. The blow prostrated her, but only for a moment, when promptly recovering herself she sped down the hill to the bank of the creek. Glancing over her shoulder as she ran, she saw Spicer strike her sister three times on the temple. She hastened along the creek to her home and carried the sad tidings of the capture of her sisters. The Indians might have overtaken her if they had been so disposed, but in that event the other sisters might have successfully made their escape, and therefore they refrained from pursuit. She escaped, and the Indians also made their get away.

As soon as Christina communicated the news to the distressed family, they made a hasty departure from their home and fled to Findley's block house for shelter and protection, due to the fact that the Crow fort was small and unprotected. It being late in the evening when they arrived there, no efforts could be made that night to overtake the captors and their prisoners, but with the first streaks of dawn on the following morning a party set out with a view of rescuing the prisoners and punishing their captors. Upon reaching the spot where the capture had occurred, to their horror and dismay they found that the tragedy, which they feared had been accomplished. They found the oldest girl - Elizabeth - still living, but fatally wounded. A little distance from where Elizabeth lay writhing in her pain were found the dead bodies of the two other sisters - Catherine and Susan. Elizabeth had been scalped, but not killed outright, and came to enough to crawl down to the creek to get a drink. Two days later she was found still alive by a hunter named Enlow, and carried to the shade of a clump of trees growing around the great boulder in the bottom, near the creek. Here the family returning with a posse of armed men, found her and her protector the same day. She retained sufficient vitality to give an intelligible account of the incident of their surprise and capture, together with the details of the aftermath, and the treatment which had been accorded them by the savages and the renegade Spicer. She survived until the third day after the event when she expired.

The Crow family, on two occasions, had suffered terribly at the hands of the Indians. Christina Crow was the sole survivor of the last tragedy related. Some years later, when she had grown to womanhood, the renegade, Spicer, and an Indian had the boldness to ride up to the Crow home one summer day and ask for a drink of buttermilk. The horn had just been blown for dinner, and Christina and her mother, Susannah, were in the garden gathering vegetables. Christina looked up and exclaimed to her mother. "Law, these are the very men that killed the girls!" The mother abruptly refused the request for buttermilk, and the men, probably suspecting that they had been recognized, rode hurriedly away. As the Crow men came in from the bottom, where they had been having a log rolling, they saw Spicer and the Indian, gay in bright colored blankets, riding down through the fields. One of the Crow boys took out his gun (they always went armed to work); and leveled it at a bright flower that adorned the blanket of the Indian and in play snapped the half cocked trigger. As soon as the log rollers reached the house, the women hastened to tell them who the strangers were. They all came into the house, except two of the Crow boys, who stood aloof in whispered conversation. These two boys ate a hasty dinner, shouldered their guns and started out on foot to follow Spicer and the Indian. For hours they walked as rapidly as they could uphill, and ran downhill on the level, easily following the fresh footprints. But those pursued must have sensed danger and trotted horses, for by nightfall they had not been overtaken by the Crow boys.

Discouraged and exhausted, the boys camped for the night. The next morning, they resumed the trail, going only a short distance before they found the campfire still smoldering. The outcome of the chase was never revealed. Peace had been made with the Indians, and it was a crime to kill an Indian. When questioned, neither of the boys would affirm or deny any accusations, but merely reply that they were close enough to count the buttons on the Indian's coat.

In a later incident involving Indians, two of the boys, Martin and Frederick, decided to go scouting into the Ohio. After going out about Coshocton, they came upon an Indian camp and at once concealed themselves to await darkness. It appears that the actions roughly paralleled that of the Indians when they attacked the boys, and killed their brother, John, on Fishing Creek. After a while, two Indian warriors came in, built a fire, and cooked their supper. Finally, one of them went into the tepee and lay down to sleep. When the other Indian departed, the Crow boys stole up to the tent, pulled up a peg and lifted the edge right by the Indians' head. One of the boys held up the flap while the other shot the Indian through the head. They jerked his blanket off, took his gun and belt for trophies, and made their way through the woods toward home. The Crow boys felt, no doubt, that they had in a measure accomplished something to square their account with the Indians.

Three of Jacob's grandsons fought in the Civil War on the side of the Union. Two of the boys, Thorton and Madison Crow fought at the battle of Bull Run and were killed. They are buried at Arlington Cemetery. Jacob died August 18, 1822, in Richhill, Greene County, Pennsylvania. Susan died a few years later. Both are buried in the family cemetery in Richhill Township, Greene County, Pennsylvania. Jacob Crow's will was as follows:

In the name of our Lord, amen I Jacob Crow of Richhill, Township Green County and State of Pennsylvania Being weak in body But of sound understanding and memory Blessed be God for it do this fourth day of November in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and Twenty one doth make and publish this last will and testament and desires that it may be Received By all as such in manner following that is to say first I will and positively order that my wife Susanah Crow to have Thirty Dollars per yeay out of the estate during her life time and secondly, I will and positively order that my son Frederick Crow shall have fifty Dollars more of the estate than any one of the rest of the Legetees and the said Frederick and all the legetees to have an equel part of the estate of the late deceased Jacob Crow at the decease of his wife Susanah Crow and thirdly I will and positively order that my wife shall have all the household furniture and one cow and lastly I make and ordain My Son Michael Grow and Moses Dunamore Sole Executrix of this my will in trust for the intent and purpose in this my will contained & in witness whereof I the said Jacob Grow have set my hand and seal the day and year above written

Test

signed Jacob Gro

his
John X Sicels
mark

Mary Crow

Penna Green County ss.

Personally appeared before me John Sicels and Mary Crow and on there solemn oaths did depose and say that they were present and saw and heard Jacob Crow the testator within named Sign, Seal publish and declare the same as and for his last will and Testament and at the time of doing thereof he was of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding according to the best of their knowledge observation and belief.

His
John X Sicels
mark

Mary Crow

Sworn and subscribed before me this 18th day of August 1823

Wm. T Hays

[the above preceeds what I first sent you]

REFERENCES

Crow Family:
"The Fireside Stories of the Jacob Crow Family", J. H. Crow, 1979, p. 5-9, 123-129
"The Memories and Writings of Harold David Somerville", Vol. 1, 1999, p. 184
"HISTORY OF THE UPPER OHIO VALLEY," Vol. I, Brant & Fuller, 1890.
Will of Jacob Crow, recorded in Green Co. PA Will Book 1, pg 228, File #408: www.FamilyTreeMaker.com cynthia-L-Starks

(2) www.findagrave.com:

Esther Crow Sailor
Birth: Sep. 9, 1782, Greene County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Sep. 9, 1853, Elkhart County, Indiana, USA

Sailor Cemetery no longer exists. It was located on the north side of County Road 32, approximately 600 feet west of County Road 3, in Olive Twp., just east of Baugo Creek. The remaining stones for this cemetery were copied in 1985. They had to be dug up as they had bulldozed and pushed to one side to make room for a poultry house. Only 8 stones were recovered that were still legible. It is believed that there were perhaps as many as 15-20 total burials at this site. Courtesy of Cemeteries of Elkhart County, Indiana, Volume 2, published by the Elkhart County Genealogical Society.

Family links: Spouse: Jacob Sailor (1777 - 1867); Children: Ann M Sailor Johnston (1815 - 1902)

Burial: Sailor Cemetery of Olive Township, Elkhart County, Indiana, USA

Created by: roots56
Record added: May 21, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 70172424 
CROW, Esther (I54)
 
148
(1) Des Moines County, IA Marriage Book #11, 30 April 1879 - 7 December 1882, p. 25:

Certificate #304 - HALE, Joseph F., 23; b. D. M. Co., IA; f. HALE, R.E.; m. BERKY, Malinda; br: MERCHANT, Susan, 28; b. Kent, Eng.; f. MERCHANT, William; m. SMITH, Susan; marr 21 Dec 1881 at Pleasant Grove by Rev. A. F. Fuller. 
Family F737
 
149
(1) Early Marriages in Appanoose County, Iowa, 1847-1900, Volume 1, p. 48:

Frost, Mauford 24 to Cora A. Fenton 23, Sept. 15, 1898, Bk 13 Pg 470.

(2) Iowa Marriages, 1851-1900 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000-:

Name: MAUFORD FROST
Spouse: CORA A. FENTON
Marriage Date: 15 Sep 1898
County: Appanoose
State: IA

(3) The compiler believes that the the given name of the groom was Manford, not Mauford. 
Family F1368
 
150 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1665)
 

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