First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 25,399

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 508» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1

(1) Obituary from an unknown newspaper [probably a Carthage, MO newspaper], date unknown:

JAMES F. DOWNEY
FORMER RESIDENT DIES IN CALIFORNIA

Former Carthage resident, James Francis Downey, 67, Anaheim, CA, died suddenly Saturday night at Anaheim, where he had just returned the first of July following a visit with family and friends in Carthage.

Born Dec. 30, 1911, in Hillsdale, OK, he came to Carthage with his parents at the age of three, graduating from Carthage Senior High School in 1929.

Following graduation he moved to the State of California and was married to Ruth Daugherty.

Mr. Downey, a retired butchers union business representative, is survived by his wife, a daughter Muriel Rex, and three grandchildren, all of the State of CA.

Additional survivors include his parents Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Downey Sr., 1036 James St.; three sisters, Mrs. Velma Marietta, Anaheim, CA and Lorene Clinton and Phyllis Jean Hamilton, and four brothers, Harold L., J. E. "Doc" Jr., L. J. and Donald, all of Carthage, MO.

Services and burial will be in CA.

Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association.

(2) Obituary from an unknown newspaper [probably an Anaheim, CA newspaper], date unknown:

JAMES F. DOWNEY

Downey, James F. of Anaheim, passed away suddenly July 21, 1979 at a local hospital. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; Daughter, Mrs. Muriel Rex of El Toro; parents, Mr. & Mrs. Jessie Downey; four brothers, Harold, J. E. Jr., L. J. and Don; three sisters, Mrs. Phyllis Hamilton, Mrs. Lorine Clinton, all of MO, Mrs. Velma Marietta of Anaheim; and three granchildren. Mr. Downey had lived in Anaheim for the past 44 years. Funeral Services will be held at the Anaheim First Christian Church, on Tuesday, July 24, 1979 at 2:00 P.M. Rev. Ragon Flannery will officiate. Interment will be made at Loma Vista Memorial Park in Fullerton. Friends may call at the mortuary tonight, Monday, until 9:00 P.M. Baggptt & Schacht Mortuary Directors.
 
DOWNEY, James Francis (I1670)
 
2

(1) "Edwin Arlington Robinson," Encyclopædia Brittanica, 2010, © 2010 Encyclopædia Brittanica, Inc.:

Edwin Arlington Robinson, (b. Dec. 22, 1869, Head Tide, Maine, U.S. - d. April 6, 1935, New York, N.Y.), American poet who is best known for his short dramatic poems concerning the people in a small New England village, Tilbury Town, very much like the Gardiner, Maine, in which he grew up.

After his family suffered financial reverses, Robinson cut short his attendance at Harvard University (1891-93) and returned to Gardiner to stay with his family, whose fortunes were disintegrating. The lives of both his brothers ended in failure and early death, and Robinson's poetry is much concerned with personal defeat and the tragic complexities of life. Robinson himself endured years of poverty and obscurity before his poetry began to attract notice.

His first book, The Torrent and the Night Before, was privately printed at his own expense. His subsequent collections, The Children of the Night (1897) and The Town Down the River (1910), fared little better, but the publication of The Man Against the Sky (1916) brought him critical acclaim. In these early works his best poetic form was the dramatic lyric, as exemplified in the title poem of The Man Against the Sky, which affirms life's meaning despite its profoundly dark side. During these years Robinson perfected the poetic form for which he became so well known: a structure based firmly on stanzas, skillful rhyming patterns, and a precise and natural diction, combined with a dramatic examination of the human condition. Among the best poems of this period are "Richard Cory," "Miniver Cheevy," "For a Dead Lady," "Flammonde," and "Eros Turannos." Robinson broke with the tradition of late Romanticism and introduced the preoccupations and plain style of naturalism into American poetry. His work attracted the attention of President Theodore Roosevelt, who gave him a sinecure at the U.S. Customs House in New York (held from 1905 to 1909).

In the second phase of his career, Robinson wrote longer narrative poems that share the concern of his dramatic lyrics with psychological portraiture. Merlin (1917), the first of three long blank-verse narrative poems based on the King Arthur legends, was followed by Lancelot (1920) and Tristram (1927). Robinson's Collected Poems appeared in 1921. The Man Who Died Twice (1924) and Amaranth (1934) are perhaps the most often acclaimed of his later narrative poems, though in general these works suffer in comparison to the early dramatic lyrics. Robinson's later short poems include "Mr. Flood's Party," "Many Are Called," and "The Sheaves."

(2) Obituary published in The New York Times on April 6, 1935, Copyright © The New York Times:

EDWIN A. ROBINSON, POET, IS DEAD AT 66

Succumbs in Hospital After Long Illness - Won Fame After Years of Writing.

EARLY WORKS REJECTED

Contemporaries Paid Homage on 50th Birthday - Europe Added Its Praise.

Edwin Arlington Robinson, one of the most famous poets of America, died at 3 o'clock this morning in New York Hospital, where he had been under treatment for a chronic ailment since Jan. 17. He was 66 years old.

Mr. Robinson underwent an operation recently and had been reported near death for the last few days. He was unmarried.

In a literary period of best sellers, hurried writing and vast quantity of prose and poetry, the art of Edwin Arlington Robinson was for many years reserved for the elite of discerning readers.

His mature and sensitive works were not to be denied, however, though Heaven knows that Mr. Robinson was the last to push himself forward in the scramble for recognition. His attitude, indeed, was one of retirement amounting almost to shyness. His dislike for publicity was as intense as his contempt for the modes, trends and tempo of our day.

Pulitzer Prize Winner.

Three times crowned with the Pulitzer Prize, he was not the type of man to become intoxicated by success. In his little apartment on East Forty-second Street, facing the East River, Mr. Robinson wrote many of the volumes that have caused him to be regarded as one of the most significant figures in modern poetry, not merely in this country but anywhere.

Charles Cestre, head of the English department of Sorbonne University, ranked him as one of the outstanding American writers of all time. Mr. Robinson appeared serenely indifferent to praise and he had no occasion to worry about adverse comment, for none of his latter-day reviewers had any fault to find.

Mr. Robinson's poems stood out like poppies in a dandelion field. Take some of his more recent lines,
from "Nicodemus."

I am always right.
If I were wrong I should not be a priest.
Caiaphas rubbed his hands together slowly,
Smiling at Nicodemus, who was holding
A black robe close to him and feeling it
Only as darkness that he could not see.
All he could see through tears that blinded him
To Caiaphas, to himself, and to all men
Save one, was one that he had left alone.
Alone in a bare room, and not afraid.

The poetry of Mr. Robinson revealed the stylist and the purist articulate. He had acquired - or it was born in him - that sureness of expression and keen sense of rhythm which have made poetry worth its name remain with us from the earliest bards. He had also a power to place his reader in a far-away period of enchantment, as in his Arthurian poems, though most of his verse was of this day.

Described Himself as Fatalist.

Although a retiring man, Mr. Robinson abhorred false modesty. He was loath to talk about himself and he refused absolutely to recite any of his verse in public. He had no sympathy for rhymesters. He said on one of the few occasions that he consented to being interviewed:

"I am a fatalist as far as poetry is concerned. If a man has poetry in him, it will out; if not, he will produce only verse. There is too much verse and too little poetry in the world today."

It was not until twenty-five years after Mr. Robinson had published his first volume, "The Torrent and the Night Before," that he won the Pulitzer Prize. By that time - in 1921 - he had ceased to remain comparatively unknown.

The same prize came again with "The Man Who Died Twice" - in 1925 - and for the third time with "Tristram," in 1927. The latter work was considered by many his chef d'oeuvre.

In an article entitled "The First Seven Years," which appeared in 1930 in The Colophon and which was perhaps his only contribution of that nature, Mr. Robinson recalled his early struggles in the search for words.

"In those days," he wrote, "time had no special significance for a certain juvenile and incorrigible fisher of words who thought nothing of fishing for two weeks to catch a stanza or even a line, that he would not throw back into a squirming sea of language where there was every word but the "one he wanted. * * * He wanted fish that were smooth and shining and subtle, and very much alive, and not too strange; and presently, after long patience and many rejections, they began to bite."

So much for his own critical mind. Then came the struggle for recognition by editors and publishers.

Mr. Robinson recalled that "my collection of rejection slips must have been one of the largest and most comprehensive in literary history."

After fruitless attacks on publishers, he became resigned and finally decided to have his first volume of poems printed at his own expense.

"By degrees," wrote Mr. Robinson, "I began to realize that those well-typed and harmless looking verses of mine might as well be written, so far as possible attention or interest on the part of editors and publishers was concerned, in the language of the Senegambians."

When he was 17, Mr. Robinson made a metrical translation of Cicero's first oration against Catiline. It was written and rewritten with a prodigality of time that only youth can afford.

"It must have been about the year 1882," he wrote, "when I realized finally, and not without a justifiable uncertainty as to how the thing was to be done, that I was doomed, or selected, or sentenced for life, to the writing of poetry. There was nothing else that interested me."

One of those who "discovered" Mr. Robinson was President Theodore Roosevelt. The President had read his second volume of poems, "The Children of the Night," and with characteristic spontaneity he offered the young writer a position in the Custom House in New York, which he accepted. Some years later Mr. Roosevelt offered him the post of Consul General in Mexico, D. F., but this he declined. He resigned his Custom House post after several years.

To the chorus of approval which had already begun Mr. Roosevelt added, writing in The Outlook in August, 1905:

"There is an undoubted touch of genius in the poems collected in this volume ('The Children of the Night'), and a curious simplicity and good faith, all of which qualities differentiate them sharply from ordinary collections of the kind."

When Mr. Robinson was 60 years old there was no bustle or dinners of honor. The newspapers published a paragraph headed "Robinson, Poet, 60 Years Old."

"Edwin Arlington Robinson, American poet, thrice winner of the Pulitzer Poetry Prize," said the paragraph, "celebrated his sixtieth birthday yesterday by working in his studio on East Forty-second Street, overlooking the East River. When in this city Mr. Robinson resides in a room above the apartment of his friend, James Earle Fraser, the sculptor, where he does much of his work."

On Mr. Robinson's fiftieth birthday, Dr. Bliss Perry, writing in THE NEW YORK TIMES Book Review section, made the following observation:

"He (Mr. Robinson) has an ascetic hatred of the trite word, the facile phrase, the rhetorical cadence. His individual idiom - as clearly marked as John Donne's, whom he resembles in many ways - was apparent from the first, even in the villanelles and ballads and octaves of 'The Children of the Night.'

"His most obvious triumphs have been in the creation of imaginary personalities and in revealing them through the medium of the dramatic monologue and dramatic lyric."

Eloquent Tributes Paid Him.

Edwin Markham added that "as a psychologist he approaches the power of Browning, yet in style he is as simple as Whittier."

Others who joined In the tributes included Anna Hempstead Branch, Witter Bynner, Hermann Hagedorn, Louis V. Ledoux (a friend who had been Mr. Robinson's business adviser for many years), Vachel Lindsay, Amy Lowell, Percy Mackaye, John G. Neihardt, Josephine Preston Peabody, Corinne Roosevelt Robinson, Sara Teasdale and Ridgely Torrence.

A New Englander by birth, Mr. Robinson was of New York by long residence. He maintained, however, his Yankee traditions and never allowed himself to fly into ecstatic verbiage.

He was born at Head Tide, Me., on Dec. 22, 1869, son of Edward and Mary E. Palmer Robinson. His father was a shipbuilder and timber merchant, and he came of old English stock, one of his ancestors having been John Robinson, a yeoman of Lincolnshire and an organizer of the Mayflower expedition. He did not, however, leave England. His son, Isaac, settled in New England in 1631.

After attending public school at Gardiner, Me., he went to Harvard University, where he stayed from 1891 to 1893. The little town of Gardiner, close to his birthplace, was described by Mr. Robinson in some of his poems as "Tillbury Town."

From his earliest childhood he preferred books to games, and as he grew up that thirst for reading became more acute. Tall and retiring, he developed early that love of solitude which remained with him through life.

At Harvard Mr. Robinson saw his first poem in print in The Lampoon. It was entitled "Ballade of a Ship." The death of his father caused him to return home from college. His mother died in 1896 and that same year Mr. Robinson placed his first collection of short poems, "The Torrent and the Night Before," in the hands of publishers. This volume is now long out of print and is a rare item for the collector.

In 1898 Mr. Robinson returned to Harvard and took up a position in the publishing office there, and at the close at the semester he came to New York City.

The early years in the metropolis were by no means easy. He had to take work where he could find it, and for a time he was timekeeper for a gang of laborers in subway construction here. His third volume , "Captain Craig." did not appear until 1902, and after that there was an interval of eight years before "The Town Down the River."

Two plays were next to appear, "Van Zorn" in 1914 and "The Porcupine" in 1915.

From then on, however, Mr. Robinson devoted himself exclusively to the writing of poetry, and some of
his finest works date from those years.

Praised by Amy Lowell.

"Edwin Arlington Robinson is poetry," said Amy Lowell. "I can think of no other living writer who has so consistently dedicated his life to his work. He is a poet for poets, his art becomes only the more interesting the more it is studied."

After the Interlude of writing plays, Mr. Robinson wrote in succession "The Man Against the Sky" (1916), "Merlin" (1917), "Lancelot" (1920), "The Three Taverns" and "Avon's Harvest" (1921). The Pulitzer Poetry Prize was awarded for his Collected Poems.

There followed "Roman Bartholow" in 1928 and "The Man Who Died Twice," which won for him his second Pulitzer award. Mr. Robinson's next works were "Dionysus in Doubt" and "Tristram." The latter won the third Pulitzer Prize.

His collected poems in five volumes appeared in 1927. Mr. Robinson's last works were "Sonnets," "Cavender's House," "The Glory of the Nightingales," "Matthias at the Door," "Nicodemus," "Telifer" and "Amaranth." The last work, a dramatization of a dream, was published in 1934.

Shortly before the publication of "Tristram" Mrs. August Belmont read parts of the poem to a crowded
audience in the Little Theatre. Mr. Robinson refused to be present during the reading. More than 75,000 copies of the volume were sold in the next two years.

Some years ago Mr. Robinson said:

"The real poet, like the real artist, is a freak of nature, and for this reason no man would attempt to prophesy the future developments in this field of letters. No poet can be an adequate judge of his own writing, and only the passage of time can set the seal of authentic genius on anything written today. Whatever laurels I receive must, to be good for anything, be green long after I and my generation have withered."

Mr. Robinson passed many Summers at the MacDowell Colony at Peterboro, N. H. In 1927 he was elected a member of the National Academy of Arts and Letters and in 1929 the National Institute of Arts and Letters, of which he had long been a member, awarded him a gold medaI. In 1931 he was selected by the students of Barnard College as their favorite poet.

Among the most famous of all his lines are those on Lincoln:

For he, to whom we have applied
Our shopman's test of age and worth,
Was elemental when he died.
And he was ancient at his birth:
The saddest among kings of earth,
Bowed with a galling crown, this man
Met rancor with a cryptic mirth,
Laconic - and Olympian.

Mr. Robinson had often been pointed out as the poet who thought failure was really more interesting, and possibly even better, than success. His ideas are set forth in "Miniver Cheevy."

Miniver scorned the gold he sought,
But sore annoyed was he without it;
Miniver thought, and thought, and thought,
And thought about it.

Miniver Cheevy, born too late,
Scratched his head and kept on thinking;
Miniver coughed, and called it fate.
And kept on drinking.

In his first hard days of struggle in New York, when he lived in tiny rooms on Twenty-third Street, in Yonkers, and in the back room behind a saloon, he got to know more than one Miniver Cheevy.

Those were the days before the letter from President Roosevelt was pushed under the poet's door.

A well-known part of one of the early sonnets from "Children of the Night," runs:

O brother men. if you have eyes at all,
Look at a branch, a bird, a child, a rose,
Or anything God ever made that grows -
Nor let the smallest vision of it slip
Till you can read, as on Belshazzar's wall,
The glory of eternal partnership!

Dr. Robinson received the degree of Doctor of Literature from Yale University in 1922 and from Bowdoin
College in 1925.

(3) www.findagrave.com:

Edwin Arlington Robinson
Birth: Dec. 22, 1869
Death: Apr. 6, 1935

Poet.

Burial: Oak Grove Cemetery, Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine, USA
Plot: Lot 508

Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Jan 01, 2001
Find A Grave Memorial# 881
 
ROBINSON, Edwin Arlington (I15608)
 
3

(1) A household headed by Hugh STARNES is listed in the 1850 census of the 1st District of Coffee County, TN.

Hugh is listed in the 1850 census as a farmer who was then 22 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1828. According to the 1850 census, he was born in TN.

Listed with Hugh is his wife, Mary, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1833. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.

Also listed with Peter is his daughter, Nancy, who was then one month old; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1850. According to the 1850 census, she was born in TN.
 
STARNES, Hugh (I2925)
 
4

(1) A household headed by William STARNES is listed in the 1880 census of the 6th Precinct, Grayson County, TX.

William is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer who was then 26 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1854. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were also born in TN.

Listed with William is his brother, James P., who was then 24 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1856. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were also born in TN.

Also listed with William is his sister, Hattie, who was then 17 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1863. According to the 1880 census, she was born in MO, and both of her parents were born in TN.

Also listed with William is his sister, Laura, who was then 12 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, she was born in about 1868. According to the 1880 census, she was born in IL, and both of her parents were born in TN.

Listed with William is his brother, Fletcher, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1880 census, he was born in about 1870. According to the 1880 census, he was born in TN, and both of his parents were also born in TN.
 
STARNES, William (I2920)
 
5

(1) According to Charles Walker Gross, Myrtle GROSS was born on March 21, 1885. However, if she were born in 1885, she would have been born when her mother was more than 50 years of age.
 
GROSS, Myrtle L. (I3208)
 
6

(1) According to the 1900 census of Union Township, Putnam County, OK, Olive (FROST) ACKLEY had given birth to 3 children, 2 of whom were then living. Neither the name nor the sex of the deceased child is listed in the 1900 census.

Based on the date of marriage of Frederick ACKLEY and Olive Pearl FROST (March 13, 1892), and the dates of birth of the couple's 2 children who were living as of the time of the 1900 census (February 1893 and April 1899), the compiler believes the couple's other child was probably born sometime between February 1893 and April 1899.
 
ACKLEY, --- (I1488)
 
7

(1) Alexander, Jill, Narrative of Frost Family:

Amos Kendall [Frost] born 2 September 1817, married Elizabeth Caroline Butler born 1821. He died 22 May 1887.
They had four children:

1. William E. born 10 November 1840
2. Laura Marie born 24 September 1842, married William Kenton Staggs 19 February 1861 in Nelsonville, Missouri. They had five children:
2.1. Laura Caroline Staggs
2.2. Willie Staggs
2.3. Ida Staggs
2.4. Virgie Staggs
2.5. Jessie Staggs
3. Edward Williamson born 1845, married Louise Buckner Staggs 3 May 1867, died 21 September 1914. They had five children:
3.1. Edward Bertram born 25 December 1868, married Susan Bascome 1892, had one child:
3.1.1. Blanche married [?] Furlong, had two children:
3.1.1.1. Elizabeth Furlong
3.1.1.2. A.E. (Bill) Furlong
3.2. Frank Amos born 25 October 1874, married Clara Smith, had two children:
3.2.1. Willard
3.2.2. Carol
3.3. William Augustus (Jack) born 22 February 1876, married Lillian Noble who died 30 June 1911. Divorced.
3.4. Isabel Louise (Bobbie) born 20 February 1979
3.5. Harold Everleth born 19 October 1881, married Irene Louise Woodward who died 1912. They had one child:
3.5.1. Irene Louise, married Chester Black, had one child:
3.5.1.1. Gordon Marion Black
Harold married a second time to Grace Estelle Cherry, had two children:
3.5.2. Harold Edward, married Leota [?], had two children:
3.5.2.1. Stephanie
3.5.2.2. Leslie
4. June Maurine, married [?] Gilmore, had three children:
4.1. Steven Gilmore
4.2. Kirk Gilmore
4.3. Elizabeth (Libby) Gilmore
4.4. Mary Louise born 23 September 1848, married Frank Mathison 4 April 1867

Members of Amos Kendall's family later moved to Little Lake, now called Willits [Mendocino County], California. They were involved in the biggest gunfight in the West. In 1867, Little Lake was split even after the Civil War, then called the War Between the States, between Southern and Northern sympathizers. The Frosts were the pro-South faction and the Coates clan from Wisconsin, strongly pro-North. When the gunfight between the two families ended-it lasted 15 seconds-six people were shot dead: the Frosts lost Elisha, and the Coates lost Joseph, Wesley, Abraham, Thomas and Henry. [I've just returned from Willits and the Little Lake Cemetery, and, indeed Elisha Frost is buried there, along with the Coates. But I'm having trouble with the name, Elisha, and the other Frosts buried there: Elijah, for instance-neither name appears anywhere else in my line, but both names appear in other lines. Perhaps, then, this sad event belongs to another Frost family. Obviously, I need to do more research].
 
FROST, Amos Kendall (I723)
 
8

(1) Alexander, Jill, Narrative of Frost Family:

Catherine born 23 February 1828, married Charles Wickham, had one child:

1. Smith Wickham

Catherine married again to John Conrad McDonald, died 4 March 1904 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, buried at Wheeling Cemetery, Wheeling, West Virginia
 
FROST, Catherine (I731)
 
9

(1) Alexander, Jill, Narrative of Frost Family:

Four of William and Rachel Rebecca Frost's sons went west around 1849 and became involved in journalism-writing, editing, printing and publishing. In 1850, Griffin Frost went to Wheeling, Virginia (now West Virginia) to learn the printing trade. In 1854, he left for Palmyra, Missouri to start The Sentinel. Eventually, he settled in Edina, Missouri where he established the Edina Democrat. Griffin Frost and William Printz Frost were considered fathers of journalism, and both wrote furious attacks against the Northerners (Missouri was initially Southern, then captured by the North, next captured by the South, and finally taken by the North). They were, obviously, pro-Confederate.

In 1858, Daniel Frost bought the (Jackson) Virginia Chronicle from his brother, William Printz Frost who had started it in 1853, and became its editor. Jackson later became part of West Virginia with Daniel being actively involved in the split of the state. He eventually became West Virginia's first Speaker of the House of Representatives. Daniel was pro-Federalist and fought as a colonel in the 11th West Virginia Infantry, a Union Army unit. He died fighting in the battle of Snickers Gap, the name of the road leading to Coo/ Springs Plantation in Clarke County, Virginia near Snickersville, east of Berryville. Ironically, the plantation was owned by his brother, Eben Frost, who was strongly pro-Confederate.

John Lynn Frost was an editor first in Missouri, then in Illinois

William Printz Frost ended up in Mexico, Audrain County, Missouri. He especially hated Abraham Lincoln. At one point after the Civil War, he was asked repeatedly by a Yankee commander to cease his editorials against the North. William Printz Frost kept up his tirades. The Yankee commander asked him a second time to desist. Finally, he asked William to step outside where a noose had been swung over a tree with a horse standing under it. The commander nodded to his troops who put William on the horse and looped the rope around his neck. The officer then asked William one last time to quit his diatribes. William was silent. The commander nodded, the troops pulled William off the horse and faced him to his newspaper building. They then lit a torch and burned the place to the ground. Afterward, they took the printer's ink that had not burned and poured it down William's plantation well. He was ruined financially but unrepentant and continued to rail on during Reconstruction.

Also in 1849, William married Martha Snodgrass born 11 June 1826. After they married in .Jackson County, Virginia (now West Virginia), the couple traveled to Missouri in a covered wagon carrying Aunt Lucretia, her old, black mammy who had been with the Snodgrass family for years and was considered part of it.

The Snodgrass family was well known in Virginia (now West Virginia). Her forbearers came from Pennsylvania and settled in Hardy County, Virginia (West Virginia) before the colonies had solidified. Her father, William Snodgrass born 1794, married Sallie Harness in Hampshire County, Virginia (West Virginia) in 1820. He had fought in the War of 1812 and owned vast amounts of properties and many slaves. He had six or seven daughters and was determined that they should all have an education. Since there were no schools in the area, he built one, and the neighborhood children attended, as well. Martha Snodgrass' paternal grandparents were James Snodgrass born 1769 and Elizabeth Cusick also born 1769. Her grandparents married 1793, and her grandfather died 1853. Martha's mother's family, Harness, was also originally from Pennsylvania and had settled in Virginia (West Virginia). Her mother's father was Jacob Harness, and one of her forebearers, Michael Harness, had established the first fort in the area in 1761.

William Printz Frost and Martha Snodgrass Frost had nine children, all born in Mexico, Audrain County, Missouri:

1. Edgar S. born 6 January 1850, died 12 April 1897
2. Florence V. (Cissy) born 3 March, died 24 February 1916
3. Frank N. born 14 December 1855, married Lily Herald, died 6 May 1907. They had four children:
3.1. Herald
3.2. Frances
3.3. Phyllis
3.4. Charlotte
4. Mary B. (Mollie) born 29 January 1860, died 11 November 1924
5. Minnie E. born 26 March 1862, died 14 December 1929
6. Willie Lynn (Jack) born 10 July 1864, accompanied his brothers, Jack and Clyde, to San Jose, California where they opened a grocery store. Married Nellie Gillespie, died 25 July 1931. They lived in Spokane, Washington, had two children:
6.1. Dorothy died ca. 1990 in Seattle, Washington
6.2. Virginia married Carl Cox, died ca.1990 in Seattle, Washington. They had one child:
6.2.1. Kenneth Cox had two children:
6.2.1.1. Brian E. Cox
6.2.1.2. Barry A. Cox
7. Alba H. born 15 May 1867, in his youth, went with brothers Jack and Clyde to San Jose, California and opened a grocery store. Married Gertrude Geneau, lived in the Pacific Northwest, then in Reno, Nevada, died 31 December 1931. They had three children:
7.1. Jack married Gail [?], a W.A.V.E. during World War II, had one child:
7.1.1. William (Jack) lived in Bremerton, Washington
7.2. Alba married Bud Beecher, had one child:
7.2.1. Barbara Beecher married L.A. Wilburn, had two children:
7.2.1.1. Alba Wilburn
7.2.1.2. [?] Wilburn
7.3. William lived in Tacoma, Washington, had two children:
7.3.1. Lloyd
7.3.2. Sue
8. Mattie C. born 16 February 1869, [?] December 1951
9. Clyde Peter born 24 July 1871, died 18 August 1925

William Printz Frost died in Mexico, Audrain County, Missouri 15 June 1898; Martha Snodgrass Frost died the same year.
 
FROST, William Printz Jr. (I728)
 
10

(1) Alexander, Jill, Narrative of Frost Family:

John Lynn born 19 January 1841, married Jennie Cavender, was a Confederate veteran, died 22 November 1888 in Clarence, Missouri, buried in Quincy, Illinois They had five children:

1. William Cavender married Ora Lightner in Clarence, Missouri, had two children:
1.1. Cheslyn Hunolt born 14 October 1894
1.2. Edith born 1 March 1900
2. Ralph
3. Roy
4. Griffin Lynn born 22 May 1872, married Lula Alexander in Denver, Colorado, had three children:
4.1. Evelyn
4.2. Lucille
4.3. Lynn
5. Carl Joseph born 11 August 1884, married Lula Eileen Smith 15 July 1913
 
FROST, John Lynn (I733)
 
11

(1) Alexander, Jill, Narrative of Frost Family:

Rachel Rebecca born 4 June 1838, married Fred Lewis and [?] Hunter, died 16 September 1910 in Chicago, Illinois
 
FROST, Rachel Rebecca (I732)
 
12

(1) Alexander, Jill, Narrative of Frost Family:

The Snodgrass family was well known in Virginia (now West Virginia). Her forbearers came from Pennsylvania and settled in Hardy County, Virginia (West Virginia) before the colonies had solidified. Her father, William Snodgrass born 1794, married Sallie Harness in Hampshire County, Virginia (West Virginia) in 1820. He had fought in the War of 1812 and owned vast amounts of properties and many slaves. He had six or seven daughters and was determined that they should all have an education. Since there were no schools in the area, he built one, and the neighborhood children attended, as well. Martha Snodgrass' paternal grandparents were James Snodgrass born 1769 and Elizabeth Cusick also born 1769. Her grandparents married 1793, and her grandfather died 1853. Martha's mother's family, Harness, was also originally from Pennsylvania and had settled in Virginia (West Virginia). Her mother's father was Jacob Harness, and one of her forebearers, Michael Harness, had established the first fort in the area in 1761.
 
SNODGRASS, Martha (I736)
 
13

(1) Ancestry.com, Indiana Marriages to 1850:

Indiana
Switzerland County
Spouse: Foster, William
Lineback, Catharine
Marriage Date: 03 Jan 1821
 
Family F1832
 
14

(1) Brockman, William Everett, Orange County Virginia Families, Vol. III, Minneapolis, MN: 1959, pp. 66-76:

GEORGE SYMES (born 1743 [sic]), son of Thomas Symes & wife Amy Bridges, was of West Indies. He md. Dorothy, only child of Thomas Everard of Island of Antigua in West Indies Gent. and his wife was Eliz. Geo. Symes d. 1687 leaving his bro. Henry with others as guardian of his children, Geo., John, Eliz., Christopher, & Henry but leaving hardly any estate.

Although very young Geo. Symes' sons were forced to earn their living. When old enough, Henry, the youngest, went to sea. In 1687, the year of his father's death, Geo. Symes made his way to Va. where he found work in Surry Co. with Thomas Matthews and others. But in 1698 he left Va. for Antigua.

GEORGE SYMES, son of THOMAS SYMES and his wife AMY BRIDGES, was b. c 1643 in Somerset, England, d. 1687, in Island of Antigua in West Indies; m. Dorothy, d. after Apr. 30, 1705-6, dau. of Thomas Everard, Gent. & his wife Eliz. Issue:

1. George of whom later.
2. John, d. unmarried before 1699
3. Eliz., married Ulysses Athey
4. Christopher
5. Henry
 
SYMES, Capt. George I (I199)
 
15

(1) Brockman, William Everett, Orange County Virginia Families, Vol. III, Minneapolis, MN: 1959, pp. 66-76:

GEORGE SYMES, son of George Symes and his wife Dorothy Everard, emigrated 1687 (the year of his father's death) from Antigua to Surry Co., Va. d. Hanover Co., Va. circa 1718-1723; 1698 gave John Sheltonnergen power of attorney, and returned to Antigua to collect his legacy; had issue Adam & George, and was the kinsman if not the father of John Matthew and Edward.

(2) http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/j/o/h/C-H-Johnson/GENE2-0010.html :

352. George Symes, born 1670 in England; died 1718. He was the son of 704. George Symes and 705. Dorothy Everard. He married 353. Elizabeth Sherwood.

353. Elizabeth Sherwood.

More About George Symes:

Immigration: 1687, Surry County, VA

Residence: Bef. 1687, Antigua, British West Indies

Children of George Symes and Elizabeth Sherwood are:

176 i. Adam Symes, born 1689 in VA; died 1733; married Mary Isham.
ii. Mary Symes.
iii. John Symes, married Mary Rice.
iv. George Symes, born 1709; died 1740.
v. Matthew Symes, married Hannah Mitchell.
vi. James Symes, died 1774; married Elizabeth Parrish.
vii. Edward Symes.
 
SYMES, George II (I209)
 
16

(1) Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp., Iowa Marriages, 1851-1900 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000-:

ADAMSON, E. E.
Spouse: TEMPLE, CARRIE E.
Marriage Date: 10 Mar 1889
County: Appanoose
State: IA
 
Family F1304
 
17

(1) Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp., Iowa Marriages, 1851-1900 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000-:

ADAMSON, JOHN B.
Spouse: NORWOOD, E. C.
Marriage Date: 10 Mar 1872
County: Appanoose
State: IA
 
Family F1303
 
18

(1) Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp., Iowa Marriages, 1851-1900 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000-:

GODNEY, JULIUS E.
Spouse: ADAMSON, SHARLOTTA A.
Marriage Date: 2 Sep 1869
County: Appanoose
State: IA
 
Family F1242
 
19

(1) Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp., Iowa Marriages, 1851-1900 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000-:

STEVENSON, HENRY W.
Spouse: BARKES, SARAH J.
Marriage Date: 3 Feb 1867
County: Appanoose
State: IA
 
Family F1359
 
20

(1) E-mail message from Pat Porter to J. Michael Frost dated February 10, 2001:

I have some really sad & bad news to tell you all. Larry was on his way to work on Feb. 2nd & was killed in a car accident. This is so hard & we have been through a lot.

I know that Larry would want you all to know. I know some of the names in his address book & I want everyone to know.

Larry loved his family research so much. I told our girls that I am sure that Larry is up in Heaven talking to all the people he has researched & he would still be arguing about the right dates with them.

Please have a happy life & appreciate your family & friends. We miss Larry so much you cannot even imagine!!

I know that life goes on & time helps but it is going to be a long time for us to get to that family. If you knew Larry he had everything written
down & up to date right to the end. He was so organized. I wish I knew just half of what Larry knew. He was so smart.

Think of us. We will go on.

LOVE
PAT PORTER

(2) Article from the February 3, 2001 issue of the Gainesville Sun:

Rainy day sees many crashes
By A.P. THOMPSON AND KATHY CIOTOLA
Sun staff writers

Slippery road conditions and careless driving contributed to numerous accidents on Friday, including one that killed a Gainesville man who ran into the back of a fire truck.

The first accident turned into a series of collisions Friday morning, ending in the death of Larry Porter, 55. It started when an Alachua County school bus stopped to pick up a student at about 6:43 a.m. in Alachua and a car driven by Timothy James Lucas Jr. slid more than 225 feet into the back of the bus, said Maj. Clovis Watson Jr. with the Alachua Police Department.

Only the driver and one student were on board at the time, and no injuries were reported. Lucas was cited for careless driving.

Almost immediately after returning to the station, Gainesville Fire and Rescue was dispatched back to the scene for a second accident involving two cars.

Tyre Tyrone Taylor, driving a 1988 Ford Crown Victoria south on NW 13th Street, rear-ended Rivera Natividad's Nissan Sentra. Natividad reported minor injuries, Watson said.

GFR parked its fire engine in the northbound lane and left it to attend to the injured woman. Minutes later, Porter, of 1107 NW 57th St., slammed his 1991 Toyota into the back of the fire engine, said Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Mike Burroughs.

Witnesses told investigators that Porter was looking at the school bus crash and didn't see the fire truck in time. Witnesses blew their horns to warn him, but Porter wasn't able to stop in time, Burroughs said. It was raining at the time.

Porter, who moved to Gainesville nearly five years ago from Arkansas, was taken to Shands at the University of Florida, where he later died. He was employed at Regeneration Technology in Alachua.

The fire truck's lights and flashers were on while parked, said Gainesville Fire Rescue spokesman Stuart Schwartz.

"Our rescuers make every effort to park in the safest possible place, but sometimes there is no choice but to park on the side of a roadway or on a roadway," Schwartz said. "That's why we have many lights and flashers on our vehicle, so people can be forewarned to slow down and drive around the police or rescue vehicle."

The rescuers involved will get crisis counseling because they are so upset that a citizen lost his life, Schwartz said.

Nobody was charged in that crash.

A few hours later in Micanopy, a woman was trapped in her 1996 Chrysler for nearly 20 minutes at the intersection of U.S. 441 and County Road 234 as rescue crews were struggling with how to remove her from the mangled car.

Linda Winchenbach, 50, of Ocala failed to give right of way to a 1991 Ford Explorer traveling south on U.S. 441. When Winchenbach pulled out after stopping, she was hit on the left side.

The accident left her pinned inside the vehicle for more than 20 minutes as fire and rescue crews tried carefully to extract her from the car using the Jaws of Life.

Winchenbach's left door was smashed all the way into center console, which pinned her legs in an awkward position, said Alachua County Fire Rescue spokesman Justin Lagotic. ACFR firefighters also used a wench to pry the roof off from her vehicle.

She was airlifted to Shands at AGH in serious condition, Lagotic said.

The two men in the Explorer, Vincent Covert, 33, and Joseph Debose, 46, both of Gainesville, were transported to local hospitals. Their condition was unavailable on Friday.

A.P. Thompson can be reached at 374-5095 or thompsa@gvillesun.com. Kathy Ciotola can be reached at 338-3109 or ciotolk@gvillesun.com.

(3) Obituary from the February 4, 2001 issue of the Gainesville Sun:

Larry L. Porter

Larry L. Porter of Gainesville died Friday in Gainesville. He was 55.

Mr. Porter was an engineering manager.

Born in Ottumwa, Iowa, he moved from Little Rock, Ark., to Gainesville five years ago.

He was interested in genealogy.

Survivors include his wife, Pat Porter of Gainesville; two daughters, Jenifer Ann Porter and Susan Ellen Porter, both of Gainesville; a brother, Rod Porter of Monroe, Iowa; and his parents, Vernon and Lucille Porter of Hedrick, Iowa.

Expressions of sympathy may be made as donations to the American Cancer Society in Gainesville.

(4) Social Security Death Index:

Name: Larry L. Porter
SSN: 482-54-1439
Born: 26 Dec 1945
Died: 2 Feb 2001
State (Year) SSN issued: Iowa (1961-1962)
 
PORTER, Larry L. (I882)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4027)
 
22

(1) George GROSS married Sarah ARMSTRONG on August 19, 1843 in Meigs County, TN. However, in the 1850 census and subsequent censuses of Meigs County, TN, the name of George's wife is listed as "Manda" or "Amanda." In 1858, Sarah was still living, and George was appointed as one of the executors of the estate of Sarah's father, William T. ARMSTRONG. Therefore, the compiler assumes that "Manda" or "Amanda" was the same person as Sarah.

(2) A household headed by George GROSS is listed in the 1850 census of Meigs County, TN.

According to the 1850 census, George was a farmer who was born in TN and who was then 26 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1824.

Listed with George is his wife, Manda, who was born in TN and who was then 21 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1829.

Also listed with George is his son, James, who was born in TN and who was then 5 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1845.

Also listed with George is his daughter, Jane, who was born in TN and who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1847.

Also listed with George is his daughter, Mary T., who was born in TN and who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, she was born in about 1848.

Also listed with George is his son, William E., who was born in TN and who was then 1 year of age; therefore, according to the 1850 census, he was born in about 1849.

(3) Boyer, Reba Bayless, Meigs County, Tennessee Records 1836-1881: 1984:

Will of William T. Armstrong dec'd; to beloved daughter Elisebeth Jane Cunningham; remainder to other eight children to wit Martha, Marten Van Buran,, Cyntha, Parthena., William Clayton, James Milo, Sarah Crayton, and Mary Ellon; only William Clayton and James Milo to have effects arising from my father's estate; Execs: George Gross and William S. Russell; 20 Aug 1858: wit: D.H. Russell James S. Martin & David Johns. . . .

21 Feb 1859-7 Jan 1867 Will of William T. Armstrong as was recorded on pages 433-436 in Book 1850-1858. Will probated 6 Dec 1858. Inventory and sale; 21 Feb 1859, final settlement with W.S. Russell and George Gross, Execs. of Wm. T. Armstrong dec'd who was Adm. of the estate of John Collins dec'd. 7 Jan 1867, supplementary inventory and sale of estate of Wm. T. Armstrong, not signed. . . .

26 Apr 1869-27 Apr 1869 John K. Brown, James McClarney, G.W. Gross surviving Exec. of W.T. Armstrong dec'd, John Stewart, John Crawford Jr., surviving partner of John Crawford & Son VS John A. Francisco, A. Cass Cox, Sarah S., Ida C., & Jesse S. Gilbert, J.J.F. Cox, Jos eph A. Cox, & Celia Cox gdn. Defendants, other than Francisco., are heirs of A. Cox dec'd. In Aug 1865, R. McKenzie now dec'd, made a trust deed for land in 3rd Dist. to A. Cox, Trustee for John A. Francisco to secure complainants in debts due them; Cox as trustee sold land 15 Jun 1867 to Complainants who were high bidders, but failed to make title; Cox died soon after. Chancellor rules sale valid. . . .

G.W. Gross, Exec., to A.L. Todd.

(4) A household headed by George W. CROSS? [GROSS] is listed in the 1870 census of Meigs County, TN.

According to the 1870 census, George W. was a farmer who was then 46 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1824.

Listed with George W. is his wife, Amanda, who was then 43 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1827.

Also listed with George W. is his daughter, Jan [Jane], who was then 23 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1847.

Also listed with George W. is his son, William E., who was then 20 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1850.

Also listed with George W. is his daughter, Charity, who was then 19? years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1851.

Also listed with George W. is his daughter, Martha, who was then 10 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1860.

Also listed with George W. is his son, George B., who was then 14 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1850.

Also listed with George W. is his daughter, Dicy E., who was then 9 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1861.

Also listed with George W. is his daughter, Margaret, who was then 7 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1863.

Also listed with George W. is his daughter, Lorinda, who was then 3 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, she was born in about 1867.

Also listed with George W. is his son, Alfred F., who was then 2 years of age; therefore, according to the 1870 census, he was born in about 1868.
 
GROSS, George W. (I3178)
 
23

(1) Henry LeRoy "Hank" JOHNS III :

JOHNS Marriages
Rhea and Meigs Counties, Tennessee
(First Records to 1998)

Groom First: James Franklin
Groom Last: JOHNS
Groom Age:
Bride First: Catherine
Bride Last: SINGLETON
Bride Age:
State: TN
County: Meigs
Year: 1897
Month /Day: November 17
Source: Vol 5 (1895-1902), p. 132
 
Family F2709
 
24

(1) http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/b/u/t/Pamela-Butler/GENE5-0002.ht ml:

Cumberland County Will Book 2, page 59

Probated May 25,1772

Will of Daniel Coleman

29 August 1763

In the name of God amen, August, the twenty nineth day in the year of our lord Christ one thousand seven hundred and sixty three I Daniel Coleman of Southam Parish and county of Cumberland being of sound and perfect mind and memory thanks to Almighty God and calling to the uncertainty of this transitory life and all
flesh must yield unto death when it shall please God to call do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following:

FIRST being penitent and sorry for all my sins most humbly desiring forgiveness for the same I commend my soul unto almighty God my saviour and redeemer in whose merits I trust and believe to have full remission and to inherit the kingdom of Heaven and my body I commit to the earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my executors hereafter named and for the settling of my temporal estate as it hath pleased God to bestow upon me I do order give and dispose the same in manner and form following, that is to say,

Imprimis

I give and bequeath to my grandson William Coleman son of my son Thomas Coleman after the decease of my beloved wife Patience Coleman all the tract of whereon I now live containing three hundred acres more or less with the improvements thereon also my negro boy named matt to him and his heirs forever.

ITEM my negro woman named Judith and her two children Moorning and Hannah that is now in the possession of Nehemiah Glen I lend the said negro woman and her said children above mentioned to my daughter Anne Glen and to her husband Nehemiah Glen during their natural lives and after their decease I give the said Negro woman and her two children and all their increase from the date
of these presents to be equally divided between all the children of my said daughter Anne Glen to them and their heirs forever.

ITEM my negro woman named Janney that is now in the possession of Nathan Glen I lend the said negro woman and my daughter Lucy Glen and to her husband Nathan Glen during their natural lives and after their decease I give the said negro woman and all her increase from the date of these presents to be equally divided between all the children of my said daughter Lucy Glen to them
and their heirs forever.

ITEM my negro woman named Hester and her two children Sid and Tom and my negro girl named Annis I lend to my daughter Mary Sims and to her husband Matthew Sims during their natural lives and after their decease I give the said negros Hester, Sid, Tom and Annis and all their increase from the date of these presents to be equally divided between all the children of my said daughter
Mary to them and their heirs forever.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Patience Coleman my negro woman named Hannah and all her increase from the date of these presents to her and to her own disposal forever.

ITEM I give and bequeath to my grandson Gideon Edwards all my lands, lying and being the county of Halifax and after the decease of my beloved wife Patience I give to my said grandson Gideon Edwards my two negro boys Jupiter and Jacob by name to him and his heirs forever.

And my will and desire is that after all my just and lawful debts are paid and discharged that the remainder of my estate be kept in the possession of my beloved wife Patience Coleman during her natural life and after her decease to be equally divided between all my nine children, that is to say, my sons Thomas Coleman, Daniel Coleman, James Coleman, (my daughter Judith Turner deceased her part to be equally divided between all her children) my daughters Sarah Guttery, Anne Glen, Grissel Edwards, Lucy Glen and Mary Sims to each of them and their heirs forever.

Lastly I appoint my sons Daniel Coleman, Nathan Glen and William Coleman executors of this my last will and testament disannulling all former wills by me made and declaring this only to be my last will and testament. In witness whererof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.

/s/ Daniel Coleman

Sealed and Delivered in presence of
Thomas Davenport, Jr.
William Davenport
James Davenport
Joseph Davenport

At a court held for Cumberland County 22nd January 1770, this last will and testament of Daniel Coleman deceased was proved by Thomas Davenport, Jr. and Joseph Davenport two of the witnesses thereto and by the court ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Nathan Glen one of the executors therein named who made oath according to law certificate was granted him for obtaining a probat thereof in due form giving security whereupon he and Joseph Hill, William Coleman and William Walker his securities entered into bond according to law and liberty is reserved to the other executors to join in probat.

Teste: Thompson Swann, Clerk

Cumberland County Will Book 2, page 4

Probate: 22 January 1770
 
COLEMAN, Daniel (I217)
 
25

(1) In 1937, Charles Walker Gross visited "Uncle Jim" with Charles' grandfather, Jacob C. Gross.
 
GROSS, James Alexander (I3125)
 
26

(1) Jay B. Wright, http://people.ne.mediaone.net/lsimms/tsdescent.html:

1. JOHN SYMES, of Barwick, Somerset, England, d. before 1 Sep. 1563. His wife was Jane. Petty (p. 3) says,

The visitation of Somerset, when the Herald for the crown, the official in charge of determining the records and make up of the English hierarchy, came to Somerset and recorded the families that had recorded pedigrees with the College of Heralds in London, in 1675 recorded the lineage of the Sims family, showing Thomas Symms as Great Grandson of John Symes of Barwick, through his son William Symms of Chard, and his son John Symms of Poundisford.
 
SYMES, John (I215)
 
27

(1) Jay B. Wright, http://people.ne.mediaone.net/lsimms/tsdescent.html:

4. THOMAS SYMES, b. c. 1615-1620 at Somerset, Eng. He m. 3 June 1640 at the Parish of Keynsham, Somerset, Eng., Amy Bridges. He was "of Winterbourne, co. Gloucester, later of Poundsford." He d. (when?) at Somerset, Eng. Petty (p. 3) says, "Thomas Symms was part of the Symms family of Somerset. This was a large landed family with many estates and manors. He was born in the area of Poundisford, which is the name of an estate in the Parish of Pitminster, just south of Taunton, Somerset, England."

(2) Brockman, William Everett, Orange County Virginia Families, Vol. III, Minneapolis, MN: 1959, pp. 66-76:

Thomas Symes, son of John of Poundsford and his wife Amy Horner, In Brown's Somerset Wills, p. 48, there can be found the tabulated descendants of Edw. Bridges, showing that he md. Phillippa, dau. of Sir Geo. Speke, and that his fifth child, Amy md. Thomas Symes in 1640.

Will of Elizabeth Symes, dau. of Thomas Symes & his wife, Amy Bridges: "Eliz. Symes of Doynton, Glouc., spinster. Will dated Nov. 22, 1675; pro. July 12, 1676 (Gloucester Will). My body to be buried at the disposing of my loving Ants!, Mrs. Eliz. Langton & Mrs. Katherine Bridges. To brothers Henry, Geo. & Richard Symes, 5 lbs. each. Rings to my bro. Edw. and John, my sisters Amy, Katherine, and Mary Symes, my cousin Eliz. Guise, my cousin Still, Mr. and Mrs. Wilkes, Mr. Ware & my cousin Ann Merideth. 5 lbs. to my 'Ant' Langton "Ant' Bridges, bro. Wm. Symes. Poor of Doynton. To my Uncle Geo. Bridges?Robert Wilskes for sermon. To Mary Seymour. To my bro. Thomas Symes. To my uncle Mr. Guise. To my bro. Charles; bro. Edw. & John Symes. Residue to my sisters Amy & Katherine, Extrices.

From Somerset Wills - First Series - Brown, p. 53

Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

John Langton md. Eliz. Bridges. In his will in Brown's Somerset Wills - 4th Series, he refers to Henry Symes, son of his brother-in-law, Thomas Symes.

"Eliz. Langton of Doynton, Co., Clouc. widow. Will 1696, Codicil 1699 prob. Apr. 24, 1703, by Charles Symes & Amy Meridth. Names nephew Harry Bridges bro. Sir Thomas Bridges, nephews Harry & Geo. Bridges, nieces Ann Powell & Eliz. Orange, cousin Arabella Bridges dau. of Harry Bridges, cousin William Bridges, cousin Edw. Symes, cousins Harry Symes, Geo. Symes, Charles Symes, Wm. Guise; Nephew John Symes, to his son John Symes & each of his two daus.; To Wm. Symes, Thomas Symes, & Richard Symes sons of Nephew Wm. Symes....to their sister Amy Symes. Mary, wife of nephew Richard Symes, Ann, wife of nephew Charles Symes; to poor of Almeshouse erected by my bro. Sir Thomas Bridges; to Mary wife of Nephew Wm. Symes; To Charles Symes & Amy Meredith heirs of Tenement now in the possession of Deborah Mathew; to Amy Symes, dau. of Nephew William, articles that belonged to my sister Katherine Bridges; to niece Amy Powell my silver "Bason that hath my own Coat of Arms ingraved on it'; my niece Ann Still; Eliz. Symes, dau. of my Nephew Charles Symes; Cousin Matthew Huntley of Boxwell London." Pro. Apr. 24, 1703.

THOMAS SYMES (son of John of Poundsford by Amy Horner) and his wife Amy Bridges had issue:

1. GEORGE SYMES, b. circa 1643, of whom later.
2. Richard, d. in 1723 (Will in Brown's Fourth Series p. 71), leaving his estate to his nephew Richard, son of his late bro., Wm., for life, remainder to his great-nephew Richard, son of his nephew Thomas, remainder to the elder son of said Thomas, remainder to said Thomas's bro., Wm. Symes, a clergyman.
3. John d. before 1696, leaving a son John & 2 daughters.
4. Edw. m. Susanna Champion "Edw. Symes of Bridgewater & Susanna Champion widow, Oct. 12, 1676", from "Marriage Licenses in Bath & Wells Before 1755" in N. Y. Library page 7 - note.
5. Charles m. Ann Creed "June 21, 1686, Charles Symes, Rector of Compton Martyn, Somerset, Bachelor 36, and Ann Creed of the Close of Salsbury Spinster 28".
6. Henry, of Island of Antigua, West Indies. He had sons John & Edw. in 1713 (Will of Wm. Phillippes, Brown's 4th Ed. p. 84)
7. Thomas, b. 1642; d. without issue; m. Merriel.
 
SYMES, Thomas (I201)
 
28

(1) Jay B. Wright, http://people.ne.mediaone.net/lsimms/tsdescent.html:

There appear to be conflicting views of Amy's parentage. The chart on pp. 110-111 of Antigua identifies her as "dau. of Thomas Horner of Mells, Esq.," and Morris, p. 367, and Cochran, p. 2, both citing Brown's Somerset Wills, p. 52, also identify Amy's father as Thomas Horner. However, Harleian XI, p. 57, charts the Horner ancestry, showing Sir John Horner of Mells as a son of Thomas Horner and showing an Amy (presumably the one who married John Symes, but the chart does not show a husband for her) as a daughter of Sir John. To add some confusion as to place names, whereas Antigua identifies Thomas Horner as "of Mells," Morris and Cochran say he was from "Mill County, Somerset"; that makes no sense, because Somerset (or Somersetshire) is itself a county or shire. Perhaps Morris made the error and it was repeated by Cochran. Harleian XI, p. 57, on the other hand, identifies Sir John as being "of Mells" but his father, Thomas, as being "of Cloford." Mells is west of Frome on p. 62 of the Genealogical Atlas of England and Wales. Cloford is near Mells, almost due south. Adding a bit more to the confusion, there was more than one Symes-Horner marriage: Antigua, p. 113, refers to Meriell Symes of Barwick, a widow in 1717, who was one of the daughters of Sir John Horner of Mells (thus Horner was her maiden name and Symes was her married name). In a lawsuit in 1712 (Antigua, p. 114), she was referred to as "Meriell Horner, Spinster." Antigua, p. 117, quoting from Barwick, refers to a "Thomas Symes, who resided at Barwick" as having "renewed the alliance with the Horner family by his marriage with Marilla, younger daughter of Sir John Horner, of Mells." I readily admit to further confusion here, however, because that same sentence says that the Thomas who married Merilla died at Barwick in 1681, so how could Merriel Horner have been a spinster in 1712? Were there two Horners named Meriell? The copy of Harleian XI at the New York Public Library is too fragile to photocopy, and I was unaware of the confusion at the time I was copying it by hand. Regrettably, I did not copy the list of Amy's siblings, and I do not know if Meriell was on the chart (either once or twice)at. The Horner ancestry in general, and p. 57 of Harleian XI in particular, clearly need to be revisited. It seems quite possible that Thomas Horner's will may mention a daughter Amy Horner Symes, which would eliminate any doubt, if I could see a copy of Somerset Wills, First Series; if that is so, it would prove the chart in Harleian XI to be in error in listing Amy as the daughter of Sir John. Little, p. 44, says, "In 1535 . . . Glastonbury's agent, or bailiff at Mells [where the Downside Abbey was until 1539] was a yeoman of Cloford, John Horner; Thomas Horner became the buyer, after the abbey's fall, of the middling rich Mells property. This family's rise in local society lay behind Jack Horner of the nursery rhyme. Thomas Horner's descendants have remained at Mells to this day. . . ." Dunning, p. 40, lists Sir John Horner as one of the men whose "acquisition of lands brought them from outside the county into a position of social importance, with consequent obligations of public service. . . . Glastonbury's rich manor of Mells was the plum which Sir John Horner extracted from the Crown, the cornerstone of his family's influence in the county for four centuries. . . ." Sims (H. U.), p. 2, says, that John Symes married "the daughter of Thomas Horner, also a member of parliament, and a sheriff of Somersetshire; and the son of Thomas Horner, who became a knight, as Sir John Horner, was probably the `Little Jack Horner' of Mother Goose fame, the rhyme being a sarcasm referring to the family having obtained lands formerly held by the Abbot of Glastonbury." To the latter statement, Sims (H. U.) adds this footnote: "The author obtained this rumor from the editors of Burke's Colonial Gentry, 1939 edition." Dunning, p. 44, says that, "On the Glastonbury abbey estate abbot John Selwood (1456-92) built . . . the ' pretty manor place of stone' at Mells. . . ."
 
HORNER, Amy (I204)
 
29

(1) John Pleasant GROSS was the first ordained minister of the Baptist Church in Birchwood.
 
GROSS, Rev. John Pleasant (I3106)
 
30

(1) Joyce Gass Hickey Edmondson: Branches--A History of the Hickey, Gass, Smith, Blevins, Stanfield, Francisco, Neil, Hoyle, Davis, Kerr, Sterling, Rockhold, Costner, Shults, Boggess, Lane, Peeler, Wilson, Hardin, Chattin, Samford and Keene Families, Sweetwater, TN: 1986, pp. 37-38:

The Gass Family

The Gass family was originally from Scotland. During the early 1600s the British Crown confiscated much of what is now North Ireland and moved British and Scotch Protestants into Ireland. It was during this time that our ancestors moved to Ireland.

James Gass

James was born in Dromore, County Downs [sic], Ireland on March 4, 1773. He married Elinor Bailey around 1790, and sometime around 1792 they and their infant son John and probably James' mother Mary came to this country.

It is very likely that other brothers and a sister came, too. but possible that some of the family stayed in Ireland. One older brother, John, was already in the New World and had been for some years. He had served in the War of Independence.

James, himself, became an American patriot after he immigrated and he served in the War of 1812.

James was an active Mason and brought a certificate of membership with him from Ireland to present to the lodge in Greens County, Tennessee, in which he later held several offices. He was also county constable two different times.

He and Elinor (Nelly) had about 10 children. Nelly died in 1811 and James remarried in 1814 and had another son.

James was active in the Presbyterian church. At one time, the area where Mt. Pleasant church at Gross Anchor in Greene County is, was called Gass's Campground or Gass's Shed.

James died in 1842 and is buried with his wife Nelly at Mt. Pleasant Presbyterian Church cemetery. Their stones are still legible. Following is a copy of James's will:

I James Gass being weak it body but of sound mind and memory, do make and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking and making void all other wills by me at my time made.

First I direct that my funeral expenses and an my just debts be paid as soon after my death as possible out of my moneys that I may the possessed of or may (?) come into the hands of my executors.

Secondly I will and bequeath to my beloved wife Polly Gass, the plantation that we now live on as long as she remains my widow and If she never marrys to have it during her natural life and to have all the proceeds arising from said plantation, also my two horse beasts that I now own together with all the cattle, hogs and sheep, farming (?), household and kitchen furniture with all the beds and bedding to have and to hold the same as long as she lives. She is to have full power and authority to dispose of them to (?) as she pleases, that is the beds and bedclothing at the and of her natural life, except the beds and bedclothing that my daughter Nancy owns. The plantation and other property, if any remains after her death or widowhood, and the Plantation to be sold by the executors to the highest bidder and the money arising from the sale of the land and property to be equally divided between my sons: Charles Gass, Joseph Gass, Simon Gass, William Gass and Betsy Armitage.

Thirdly I bequeath unto George Britton, son of William Britton, one horse saddle and bridle, if he the said George Britton shall remain with my wife Pally Gass on the plantation, with some clothing, til he arrives at the age of 21 years and helps to work the plantation to make a support for himself and family and if the amid George Britton should not stay until he is 21 years of age then I enjoin it upon my Executors not to let him have the horse saddle and bridle.

Fourthly it is further my will that my daughter Nancy Gass have her support of the plantation if it can be made, with her mother as long as she stays on the plantation, but if she Hite married or leaves the place then her support of the plantation to cease,

Fifthly it is my will that my Executors shall take possession of all the notes and all the money, if any on hand, at my decease and when collected to make an equal divide of said money between my 10 first children and my wife Polly Gass except the heirs of Samuel Gass deceased, and them to have $50 equally divided between them. I give unto my daughter Polly Babb $10 the balance of her share to be equally divided between her five oldest children as they become of age. Emeline, Sally, Harvy, Gustice and Phillip.

Sixthly It is my will that my son G.M. Gass have $10 and all my Interests that I have to thirty lots of land lying in Grainger County on Holston River.

Seventhly I furthermore will and bequeath unto my wife Polly Gass all the corn, bacon, wheat, oats and fodder for the support of the family and stock that we are in possession of at this time, I also bequeath unto my wife Polly Gass seventy five bushels of corn that is coming from Alfred Armitage next fall. The note I hold on Samuel Gass (?) not to be collected by my executors from his heirs. I do hereby nominate and appoint John Armitage and Charles Gass my Executors in witness whereof I do set my hand and seal this 30th day of April 1842. Signed, sealed in our presants and we have suscribed names in presants of the Testator.

James Gass

John Hay
William Robinson
 
GASS, James Sr. (I183)
 
31

(1) Joyce Gass Hickey Edmondson: Branches--A History of the Hickey, Gass, Smith, Blevins, Stanfield, Francisco, Neil, Hoyle, Davis, Kerr, Sterling, Rockhold, Costner, Shults, Boggess, Lane, Peeler, Wilson, Hardin, Chattin, Samford and Keene Families, Sweetwater, TN: 1986, pp. 38-39:

Joseph was born to James and Nelly in Greene County. He married Jane Kerr and moved to Jefferson County and later to Hamilton County near Birchwood. He sold the land left to him by his father in Greene County to his brother Charles for $44. There were 119 acres.

Joe was one of the first white people in the Birchwood area. It is said he gave the place the name Birchwood from a large birch tree that stood on the side of the branch near the spring. He had a store there, and was also said to be a wagon maker.

According to records, Joe died around 1860 (cause unknown). He may be buried in the vicinity of the first Salem Baptist Church which was located near Birchwood. The cabin Joe built there is still standing and is the oldest existing dwelling in Birchwood.
 
GASS, Joseph (I179)
 
32

(1) Mary L. GROSS is listed in a household headed by Jacob GROSS in the 1850 census of Meigs County, TN.

It is not clear whether Mary L. was Jacob's daughter.
 
GROSS, Mary L. (I3157)
 
33

(1) Matthew SIMS is shown here as the son of George SIMS II, although there is no conclusive proof known to the compiler that Matthew was in fact the son of George II.

(2) Brockman, William Everett, Orange County Virginia Families, Vol. III, Minneapolis, MN: 1959, pp. 66-76:

GEORGE SYMES, son of George Symes and his wife Dorothy Everard, . . . was the kinsman if not the father of John Matthew and Edward.
 
SIMS, Matthew I (I197)
 
34

(1) Robert R. Johns' pedigree, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com:

All of the dates, relationships, and information regarding this family group were obtained from "Glenn and Kin" 1994 ed. J. M. Christopher. The following from page 335:

In addition to his land in Hanover Co. given to him by his father Matthew II, Matthew III purchased two tracts of land in Cumberland Co., one in 1767, 200 acs. on branches of Willis' River [DB 4-196] while he was still a resident of Hanover Co. and another of 400 acs. on branches of Rockey Run of Willis' River on 12 October 1772 as Matthew Sims of Cumberland Co., [DB-5-151]. Except for land allotted to Mary as her dower, a part of these tracts were disposed of by their eldest son Bernard Sims who inherited land under the law of primogeniture which was in effect in Virginia until 1786. Bernard Sims sold the 200 acre tract to his brother in law Jesse Johns in 1784, and 2 acres to Fleming Cayce in 1791. He apparently lived on the balance of the 400 acre tract.
 
SIMS, Matthew III (I143)
 
35

(1) Robert R. Johns' pedigree, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com:

The following from "Glenn and Kin" 1994 ed. auth. J. M. Christopher, page 331:

Matthew Sims II and his wife Jemima Glenn Sims resided in Hanover Co. VA until after the revolution, [abt 1784], when they, with several of their sons and daughters and their families, moved to SC. Jemima and Matthew settled in Newberry Co. where they lived on Broad and Tyger Rivers, at the junction of the two rivers, and near their kin, Jemima's brothers and sisters and their families, the Glenns and Hopkins. By this time Matthew Sims II was refered to as Matthew Sims Sr. since his father had died many years before in VA.

Matthew II died in Newberry Co. between 14 April 1795, when he signed his will, and 18 May 1795, when appraisers were appointed to appraise his personal property. [Box 361 pkg. 2, est. 188 Newberry County Probate Records. The inventory included 27 Negroes valued at 925 pnds, livestock, furniture, and farm equipment etc., total value 1095-12-10 pnds.]
 
SIMS, Matthew II (I195)
 
36

(1) Robert R. Johns' pedigree, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com:

The LDS search file shows that in 1585 William Johns christened a son Richard at St Margaret's Church, Westminster.
 
JOHNS, Richard Sr. (I151)
 
37

(1) Robert R. Johns' pedigree, http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com:

The LDS search file shows that in 1585 William Johns christened a son Richard at St. Margaret's Church, Westminster. The Colonial Records Project Files of the Libary of Virginia have several mentions of William Johns during the early part of the 1600s. He was associated with the tobacco merchant firm Motley and Johns and was active in importing tobacco from Virginia and distributing it throughout England and Wales through a chain of retail distributors, many of whom had the surname Johns.
 
JOHNS, William (I152)
 
38

(1) Selected Counties of Ohio, 1789-1850 Marriage Index [database online]: Genealogy.com:

Vanvlerah, Samuel
Married: Mar 20, 1834
in: Tuscarawas Co., OH
Spouse: SCHOONOVER, SARAH
Gender: M
More: Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0890364.
 
Family F2994
 
39

(1) Source: Gary W. Watson :

William [Chapline] transported himself, Elizabeth, his wife, Elizabeth, their daughter, Ales [Alice] Bancroft (his wife's daughter from a previous marriage), and John Drewman, his servant, [to Maryland] in 1651. One year before, William had sent two other servants, Thomas Martin and Robert Cowper, to Maryland, undoubtedly to prepare for his family's arrival.
 
(BANCROFT), Elizabeth (I18346)
 
40

(2) Christ Church Parish, [Middlesex County,] Virginia Births, 1653-1812 [database online], Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000:

Name: John Summers
Relationship: Sone
Parents: Jno. Summers, Eliza Summers
Baptism Date: 14 Nov 1686
Comment: at ye Uper Capll
 
SUMNER, John Jr. (I37885)
 
41

(2) Law, Hugh T., How to Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, Salt Lake City, UT: Cottonwood Books, 1987, p. 86:

In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapalje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen. He spelled the surname Rapareillet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.
 
RAPAREILLIET, Olivier (I21679)
 
42

(2) Law, Hugh T., How to Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, Salt Lake City, UT: Cottonwood Books, 1987, p. 86:

In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapalje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen. He spelled the surname Rapareillet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.
 
RAPAREILLIET, Anne (I21680)
 
43

(2) Law, Hugh T., How to Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, Salt Lake City, UT: Cottonwood Books, 1987, p. 86:

In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapalje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen. He spelled the surname Rapareillet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.
 
RAPAREILLIET, Fran??ois (I21681)
 
44

(2) Law, Hugh T., How to Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, Salt Lake City, UT: Cottonwood Books, 1987, p. 86:

In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapalje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen. He spelled the surname Rapareillet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.
 
RAPAREILLIET, Nicolaes (I21682)
 
45

(2) Law, Hugh T., How to Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, Salt Lake City, UT: Cottonwood Books, 1987, p. 86:

In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapalje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen. He spelled the surname Rapareillet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.
 
RAPAREILLIET, --- (I21683)
 
46

(2) Lee, Edmund Jennings, Lee of Virginia, 1642-1892 [Reprint], Baltimore, MD: Clearfield Company, Inc., 2003, pp. 17-24:

THE LEES OF ENGLAND.

THE earliest records of England contain references to many families of this name, though spelt in many different forms. The various counties of England have been from early times dotted with Lee villages, towns, and rivers; there was scarcely a county that did not contain several Lee seats, mansions, or manors. In view of the prevalence of this name, it will be readily acknowledged that the accurate tracing of the descendants of any special progenitor is no easy task. . . .

The following sketches of ten of the principal Lee families in England are from the pen of Mr. J. Henry Lea, of Fairhaven, Mass., who has devoted considerable time to the study of the genealogies of the families of this name. His sketches may, therefore, be considered thoroughly accurate and reliable. They are necessarily very brief. These ten families are: . . .

1. Leigh of West Hall, High Leigh, Cheshire.
 
de LEGH, Hamon (I34124)
 
47

1928-29 Waco, Texas City Directory: Jacob C. (Ella) Gross, Truck farmer, Res. 3415 S. 3rd St.
1930 Waco City Directory: Jacob C. (Ella) Res. 3415 S. 3rd St.
1932-33 Waco City Directory: Jacob C. (Ella) Gross, Res. 3415 S. 3rd St.
 
GROSS, Jacob C. (I3123)
 
48

219
Parents:
Name of Child and Date of Baptism:
Witnesses:
 
SCHOONMAECKER, GrietjenMargaret (I2596)
 
49

32nd degree Mason on 23-28 Oct 1945 at Austin, TX
 
GROSS, Oscar Hamlet (I3222)
 
50

Andrew [Jackson] appeared twice in Sumner records, once in 1811 posting a $1250 marriage bond and in 1817 holding six acres of land in Captain Aldreson's Company on the Middle Fork of Drakes Creek. The Jacksons moved shortly thereafter to Pope County, Illinois on the banks of the Ohio.
 
JACKSON, Andrew (I40492)
 

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 508» Next»